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2000 
ANNUAL REPORT 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER 
MASSACHUSETTS 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



2000 ANNUAL REPORT 



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PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CHAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



COVER PHOTO TAKEN BY DAVID DARGIE - 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ENGINEERING DIVISION 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto2000ando 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

2000 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 6 

ANIMAL INSPECTION 86 

BALLARDVALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 85 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 25 

BUILDING DIVISION 25 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 31 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 26 

HEALTH DIVISION 32 

PLANNING DIVISION 36 

PLUMBING & GAS 26 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 26 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 181 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 180 

DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 61 

DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 66 

DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 71 

FINANCE & BUDGET 14 

ASSESSORS 14 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 15 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 16 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 17 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 92 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 58 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 83 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 87 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 188 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 185 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 77 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 88 

MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 88 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 51 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 38 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 39 

ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 40 

FORESTRY 42 

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS 43 

PARKS & GROUNDS 41 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY '. 41 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 42 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 53 

ANIMAL CONTROL 55 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 54 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 55 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 53 

RECORDS DIVISION 54 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION ,...'. 84 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 46 

ENGINEERING 46 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 49 

HIGHWAY 47 

SEWER 49 

SOLID WASTE 48 

WATER 48 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 74 

TOWN CLERK 23 

TOWN COUNSEL 22 

TOWN MANAGER 4 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES 110 

TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 89 

VETERANS SERVICES 73 

WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 189 



2000 BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




2000 Board of Selectmen, left to right: John P. Hess, Lori A. Becker, Chairman Brian P. 
Major, Mary N. French and Ted E. Teichert. 



The Town ofAndover, more than a place to live, is a way of life. Its legacy of democracy 
shall be preserved. Each citizen should experience the treasurer of nature, history, individual 
respect, neighborhood and learning. As resources and energy allow, each of these gifts from the 
past will be enriched in the present for those yet to be. 



Vision Statement of the 

ANDOVER BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



.gnBsv TOWN OF ANDOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 




Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 
www.town.andover.ma.us 

Dear Citizens of Andover: 

When historians look back at Andover during 2000, they will see a community that received 
Aaa Rating (the highest financial rating) by Moody's Investors Service, but they may ultimately 
conclude that this past year was "the year of the construction project". 

Last April, Town Meeting voters overwhelmingly approved the construction funding 
($31.9M) to build two new schools at the intersection of Cross Street and High Plain Road. In June, 
they re-affirmed that vote, as well as the 1999 Town Meeting vote to replace the Public Safety 
Center ($12. 9M) on North Main Street, as they voted to exclude the debt of both projects from the 
Town's Levy Limit. Both of these projects have been successfully bid, their construction is 
underway and the expectation is that they will be complete in Calendar Year 2002 (Schools in 
September and Public Safety Center in December). 

The Andover Community Youth Center discussion took center stage during the late Summer 
and Fall months. The Andover Youth Foundation (AYF), a private, non-profit organization, 
proposed to Selectmen that they privately fund and construct a 27,000 square foot facility on Town- 
owned land located behind the West Andover Fire Station. [Currently, the Town's only designated 
youth facility is a single office on the 3 rd floor of Town Offices]. After months of discussions and 
negotiations, the concept was successfully approved by Town Meeting during a Special Town 
Meeting in November. The upcoming challenge will be for the AYF to privately raise the $4 
million required to construct the facility and provide all infrastructure improvements. 

October 4, 2000 was a very significant date in our Town's history. On that date, ground was 
broken and the cornerstone was placed for Andover' s first private, permanently affordable, owner 
occupied home. The home's concept was made a reality through the dedicated efforts and heart-felt 
donations of members of the Andover Community Trust (ACT) in conjunction with other local 
philanthropists. They included a local developer who arranged the land parcel donation, a 
concerned citizen who donated the architecture and design work and the Greater Lawrence 
Vocational School that is currently constructing the new home. This Haverhill Street home is 
expected to be complete later this year and occupied soon thereafter. 

During the Winter months, a Selectmen's Sub-Committee spent many hours working with 
Senior Center supporters developing a plan to appropriate both private and public resources ($5.2 
M) to renovate Phillips Academy's Williams Hall into the new Andover Senior Center. This dream, 
which gallantly began with the intention of raising all of the funds privately, must now seek public 



support to continue. This project is expected to begin construction in 2002 and be open for service 
in 2003. 

This past year, significant time was also spent planning for the first phase of the Town's 
$26.8 million sewer expansion project through the Ballardvale, South Main Street and Rogers 
Brook neighborhoods. The necessary easements will soon be acquired and ground will be broken 
this Spring. This project, when completed, will provide new sewer services to 1,400 homes in our 
community. This, by far, is the largest sewer infrastructure expansion that Andover has ever seen, 
both in magnitude and expense. All phases of the project are expected to be complete by 2006. 

Not all projects received the same success last year as those mentioned above. The 2000 
Annual Town Meeting voted not to appropriate $1.1 million to transform the Essex Gravel Pit into 
an active and passive recreational facility that would include three multi-purpose playing fields. 
Realizing the important need for additional field space, the Andover Soccer Association this year 
stepped forward and offered to donate 5500,000 toward this project (donated over a 12 year period). 
This project will be re- visited at the 2001 Annual Town Meeting. 

This year, the Board of Selectmen focused efforts on improving the communication of each 
project's status to the citizenry of Andover. A monthly summary report is completed on each major 
project that identifies its financial and schedule status and also identifies any major obstacles or 
issues. The Town Manager also provides a Quarterly Summary Presentation on each of these 
projects. 

None of these projects would ever have materialized if it hadn't been for the dedicated 
efforts of Andover's employees, boards, committees and volunteers. These people have provided 
and continue to provide invaluable time, effort and ingenuity to see that these ideas become reality. 
I have said, and continue to believe, that what makes Andover a quality community and a special 
place to live is the people who live and work here. To all of you who volunteer your time and effort 
to improve the quality of life for all Andover citizens, I say . . . Thank You! ! ! 

During 2000, Andover saw the retirement of its Fire Chief, the promotion of a member from 
within to replace him and the re-appointment of our Town Manager. In July, Harold Wright retired 
as Fire Chief after 31 years of service - thank you Harold! Charles Murnane, Jr. was promoted to 
replace Chief Wright - Chuck's promotion was very well deserved and received by the department. 
After serving 10 years (two terms) as Andover's Town Manager, Reginald "Buzz" Stapczynski was 
re-appointed to a third five-year term - a very deserving re-appointment. 

As the Chairman of the Andover Board of Selectmen, it is both an honor and a privilege to 
serve the citizens of our community and to submit this letter for the 2000 Annual Report. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Brian P. Major, Chairrm 
Andover Board of Selectmen 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 




TOWN OF AND OVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 
www.town.andover.ma.us 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Andover: 

The year 2000 began with a wonderful Millennium celebration at Andover High School 
on New Years Eve, December 31,1999. The celebration ended with a spectacular laser light 
show at 12:00 A.M. Midnight on New Year's Day. Now that was a night to remember! 

The year 2000 ended on an equally exciting note. In early December, the Town was 
notified by Moody's Investors Service that the Town's bond rating was increased from Aal to 
Aaa. This is Moody's highest bond rating and it signifies that the Town's bonds carry the 
smallest degree of risk for the investor. In Moody's credit report, they recognized the Town for 
its "consistently strong operating performance characterized by a forward-looking management 
approach, substantial and diverse tax base with notable future opportunities, and a modest debt 
position benefiting from self-supporting enterprises and school construction aid . . . ". 

From a laser show to a Aaa bond rating ... it was a great year for the Town of Andover! 

The Town conducted its official business through two Town Meetings in 2000. The 
Annual Town Meeting was held in late April and early May and a Special Town Meeting was 
held in November. The highlights of those meetings are as follows: 

• A new 564-student Elementary School (grades K-5) and a new 450-student Middle 
School (grades 6-8) were approved at the cost of $31.9million. The two schools were 
designed to occupy the same 37-acre site in West Andover at Cross Street and High Plain 
Road. This vote was contingent upon a Debt Exemption from Proposition 2 Vi. 

• The Board of Selectmen were authorized to issue a Request for Proposal for a Youth 
Center to be located on land in West Andover behind the West Andover Fire Station. The 
facility would be built privately and turned over to the Town for the benefit of the youth 
of Andover. 

In May, a Special Town Election was held to consider the Debt Exemption questions for 
the new Elementary and Middle Schools and the Public Safety Center. The Public Safety Center 
was approved by the voters at the April 1999 Annual Town Meeting but it was decided to 
exempt the debt on that capital project along with the new schools. Both projects were approved 



4 



by the voters. The results were: 2,904 to 1,685 for the School vote and 2,361 to 2,221 for the 
Public Safety Center vote. 

At the Annual Town Election, Ted Teichert was elected to replace out-going Selectman 
Larry Larsen. Mr. Larsen retired from the Board after serving for three terms. 

On June 2, 2000, the Town of Andover officially signed a Twinning Agreement with 
Andover, Hampshire, England. This formal ceremony in England included representatives from 
both communities as well as friends from Goch, Germany and Redon, France. Andover, 
Hampshire, England, in recognition of this historical relationship, designed and erected a statute 
of Chief Cutshumache in one of their parks honoring Andover, Massachusetts. As a follow-up 
gesture, in September, the Town of Andover reciprocated by hosting members of the Borough 
Council and creating the "Hands Across the Ocean" Friendship Bridge in The Park. 

In the Fall, the Board of Selectmen conducted their annual Tax Classification hearing to 
establish the shift of property taxes between the residential and commercial/industrial taxpayers. 
This year the Board voted to maintain the tax classification at 1.26%, the same as last year. 

In 2000, the Town lost two citizens worthy of special recognition. Virginia "Ginny" Cole 
served the Town as a member of the Board of Selectmen, School Committee and Finance 
Committee. No person, man or woman, in recent memory had been a member of all three 
boards! The Board of Selectmen have created an award in her honor to recognize a citizen who 
has made outstanding and long-term contributions to the Town. The Town also lost retired Navy 
Captain George L. Street III. Capt. Street was a Medal of Honor recipient as a result of his 
heroism as a submarine captain during World War II. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
named Andover' s Greenwood Road bridge in his honor. These two individuals left a lasting 
impression on all of us. 

There was a changing of the guard in the Andover Fire Department this year. Fire Chief 
Harold J. Wright retired after 3 1 years of dedicated service to the Town. He was followed by 
Charles H. Murnane, Jr. 

The citizens of Andover today and those of the future can look back on the year 2000 and 
know that we started the new century and Millennium on a solid foundation. Please plan to 
participate in this year's Annual Town Meeting, after all, we are the largest Town in America 
that still enjoys an Open Town Meeting form of government. Come and be part of history! 



Respectfully submitted, 




'f* 



Leginald S. Stapczynski 
Town Manager 



x3 



OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER, ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 (978) 623-8200 



„«i«™™»;i 




TOWN OF AN DOVER 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Town Offices 
36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, MA 01810 
(978) 623-8200 
www.town.andover.ma.us 



TO: 

FROM: 
SUBJ: 
DATE: 



MEMORANDUM 



Board of Selectmen 

Reginald S. Stapczynski, Town Manage 

2000 Accomplishments 

December 31, 2000 




This memo highlights some of the major accomplishments of each department for 
calendar year 2000. The items described represent a sampling of what we consider to be 
the most significant achievements of the year. 

TOWN MANAGER/ BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

• Larry Larson retired after serving three terms as a Selectmen. Ted Teichert 
replaced him. 

• Peter Johnson- Staub, Management Analyst, gave notice in December that he was 
accepting a position as Assistant Town Administrator in Yarmouth, 
Massachusetts. The Board of Selectmen approved the Town Manager's request to 
replace the Management Analyst position with a higher-level Assistant Town 
Manager position. 

FINANCE AND BUDGET 

Finance Administration: 

• Received Aaa bond rating from Moody's Investors Service. 

• Provided 26 P.C. training courses for 1 10 employees since March 2000. 



Treasurer: 

• Successfully processed over 50.000 real estate and personal property bills and 
payments as well as 32.000 excise tax bills and payments. 

• Disposed of foreclosed property at 32 Lincoln Street. 
Purchasing: 

• Bid construction project for two schools and Public Safety Center and selected 
contractors. 

Information Systems: 

• Successfully completed the rollout conversion to Microsoft Office Suite for all 
Town computer users. 

• Increased amount of data available on the Town website, including the Assessor's 
database and the Community Services registration booklets. 

• Performed various hardware software printer upgrades to eliminate the use of 
outdated equipment and associated maintenance fees. 

Assessing: 

• Completed a revaluation of all property and issued tax bills for real estate and 

personal property. 

• Reviewed and processed 206 applications for abatement. 

• Settled or tried 20 cases before the Appellate Tax Board. 

• Captured over 6000 pictures of the properties for the valuation program. 
TOW'S' CLERK 

• Organized and managed five elections and two Town Meetings. 

• Implemented a Federal Census awareness program for the Town that produced an 
82% rate of return, one of the highest return rates in the State. 

VETERANS SER\TCES 

• Continued to publicize and enroll residents in successful S2 per 30-day 
prescription plan, thus saving Andover veterans hundreds of thousands of dollars. 



• Organized and ran Patriotic/Civic observances on seven different occasions, 
participated in Fourth of July activities, and ran two USAF Concerts. 

• Completed review and update of Graves Registration Files of over 5,000 Andover 
veterans. 

• Served over 750 Andover veterans and family members through office visits, 
outreach programs, and referrals. 

• Coordinated rehabilitation of the Revolutionary War era Jenkins-Woodbridge 
Cemetery and coordinated effort to dedicate the Greenwood Road Bridge to the 
memory of Captain George L. Street, III. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

Planning Division: 

• Hired New Senior Planner. 

• Undertook "Triangle Study" with MIT student design team, Essex Street Corridor 
Study with VHB, and MVRTA Commuter Station Improvement Study with 
MVRTA. 

Building Division: 

• Held groundbreaking for new Elementary and Middle Schools at Cross Street and 
for new Public Safety Center at North Main Street. 

• Completion and occupancy of two hotels (Hawthorne and Staybridge Hotels): 
completion of new production facility for California Paints; completion of first 
multistory parking garage in \o\xtl (Brickstone Properties); restoration and 
construction of additions to Andover' s oldest historic building at Phillips 
Academy (the Hardy House). 

Health Division: 



• 



• 



Expanded Adult Immunization program to include tetanus and pneumococcal 
pneumonia. 

Established participation in the Northeast Mosquito Control and Wetlands 
District. 

Promulgated two Board of Health regulations prohibiting smoking in Town 
Vehicles and established setbacks for smoking at entrances to public buildings. 



Conservation Division: 

• Purchased 7.5 acres of land at 330-332 River Road. 

• Hired Conservation Land Manager. 
COMMUNITY SERVICES 



• 



In addition to the hundreds of DCS seasonal offerings, fifty brand new classes and 
dozens of new programs were offered throughout the year to adults and children. 

• Two Eagle Scout Projects were completed. Iceland Road got a new sandbox, 
bench and steps, and an area wide rehabilitation. Recreation Park has new 
message boards at the tennis courts and pond and new benches for the concession 
stand. 

• DCS continues to use local resources to compliment its full time staff. Eight 
senior tax voucher positions were utilized, in addition to numerous students 
completing their community service or religious education requirements. 

• Several Town Departments participated in offering Town Topics to residents at 
no cost or low-cost. Participants learn about different facets of their government 
and resources available to them. 

YOUTH SERVICES 

• Nearly 75 participants skated the ramps at the Andover Community Skate Park 
throughout the summer. Included in the Park's offerings were skate clinics, 
professional skateboard team demonstrations, and skateboard and in-line contests. 
High school students also produced and directed the play "Romeo and Juliet" to 
over 1 00 spectators in the park. 

• Hundreds of young people participated in Summer and Winter lacrosse as Youth 
Lacrosse Program continued its dramatic growth, including great success by local 
high school teams. 



The AYS celebrated Women's History Month with a tribute to the women of 
Andover. The evening recognized women in the community who make a 
difference in the lives of those around them. 

The AYS summer program maintained a diverse offering of clinics, trips, and 
activities for young people in middle and high school. All trips were filled to 
capacity, and feedback was overwhelmingly positive. 



• AYS provided a variety of services and outreach to young people and their 
families. These services provide young people with the help or connections they 
need. 

ELDER SERVICES 

• Shared in the honor of the "Fran Pratt Award 2000" from the Massachusetts 
Intergenerational Network, for the MENTOR-NET Project, where senior citizens 
mentored high school students regarding college and career choices and high 
school students tutored senior citizens on the intricacies of the internet 

• Over 350 volunteers provided a wide variety of services to the Senior Center and 
other Town Departments. 

• Continued making progress in the planning and development of the new Senior 
Center Project. 

• The MVRTA awarded two lift equipped vehicles to the Town to transport senior 
citizens to the Senior Center; classes and lectures were held which allowed 
seniors to explore the importance of spirituality in the aging process; the Senior 
Center produced its first show - "There's Something About Andover"; the 
Sunrise Singers were formed and performed their first production; and a new 
format for Senior Connections was implemented that reached out to elders who 
are in need of assistance to participate fully in programs and services. 

PLANTS & FACILITIES 

• Construction contracts were awarded for the New Elementary/ Middle School 
(construction began in October 2000) and for the New Public Safety Center 
(construction began in November 2000). 

• Schematic design for Senior Center was completed. 
Initial study completed for Town Yard. 



• 



• 



Tree City USA status achieved in March 2000 - Mass Relief tree grant awarded 
for $3,240. 

Designs completed for Memorial Hall Library renovation project and Essex Sand 
and Gravel Pit Project. 

Town and School Capital Projects completed: 

- West Fire Sewer 

- New windows at AHS 

- HVAC and HVAC control upgrades for Town and School buildings 
ADA compliance projects 



10 



New carpeting and tile 

Chimney upgrades at Shawsheen and West Elementary 

Lighting upgrades 

Extensive painting 

Sports field upgrades 

Intercom and master clock system installations 

Irrigation and landscaping for the Town park 

Extensive preventive maintenance 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

• The Department received $262,485 in state and federal grants for Community 
Policing initiatives, the DARE program, and other informative/educational 
programs for the community. 

• Entered into two community partnership sub-stations, Brookside Estates and 
Memorial Circle. These stations enable officers to perform outreach for the 
citizens who reside in these areas. 

• Through a partnership with Agilent Technologies, equipped majority of vehicles 
with defibrillators and trained all officers in their use. 

• Implemented a Substance Abuse Unit in response to concerns about increased 
drug and alcohol abuse throughout the community. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

• Andover continued to be a fire safe community through the efforts of strong Fire 
Prevention and Training programs. There were no losses of life and only minimal 
injuries due to fire. 



• 



Charles H. Murnane, Jr., was appointed Fire Chief on July 6, 2000, replacing 
Chief Harold J. Wright. Chief Wright retired after 3 1 years of dedicated service 
to the Andover Fire Department. 

Five members of the Department received the Andover "Firefighters of the Year" 
Award from the Lawrence Exchange Club in October for saving the life of a 30- 
year old male stricken with a heart attack in March. Lt. James Cuticchia was also 
honored for his efforts in helping/consoling the families of six firefighters who 
lost their lives fighting a fire in Worcester in December 1999. 

The Department procured the donation of three Thermal Imaging Cameras and 
training for all departmental members. 



11 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Water: 

• New water mains were installed on Burnham Road and Dufton Road. 

• New water mains were installed on Canterbury Street and Lowell Street; and 
design is underway for Main Street and North Main Street Water Main lining. 

• Water Treatment Plant received a 100% compliance rating for microbiological 
monitoring and analysis and for organic and inorganic contaminants monitoring 
and analysis. 

• Laboratory certification scored 96% for the WS Study conducted by the EPA, 
100% for Coliform bacteria and HPC testing and 100% for total organic carbon. 

• Water Treatment Plant was featured on the front cover and in the lead article of 
the March 2000 Journal of the New England Water Works Association . 

Solid Waste: 

• Expanded the curbside recycling program to include aluminum, #1 and #2 
plastics, and corrugated containers. 

• Had one of the most successful drop-off programs for CRTs and televisions in the 
entire state, only being exceeded by a regional collection effort. 

Highway: 

• New 10- wheel dump trucks are now in service leading to the replacement of six 
hired sanders. The trucks are also being used to assist the Plant & Facilities 
Department with their hauling requirements saving both time and money. 

• Installation of new curbing on Moraine Street to delineate the entrance to the 
athletic fields and the handicap parking area. 

• Paved portions or all of 28 different roads using a combination of Chapter 90 
funds, developers' bonds, sewer articles, and individual special warrant articles. 

Engineering: 

• 1660 feet of new sewer mains and services were designed and constructed on 
Beacon Street and the West Fire Station on Chandler Road at a cost of $144,393. 



12 



• The installation or repair of 2378 feet of storm drains and underdrains totaling 
$54,957 was prepared at nine various streets. 

• 6140 feet of exiting sidewalks were designed and reconstructed on Maple 
Avenue, Summer Street, and Andover Street for $254,838, and 2900 feet 
designed on River Street, which is to be constructed in Spring 2001. 

• Work was performed with the town's consultant for the design and reconstruction 
of the River Street Bridge at a cost of approximately $531,000, which will be 
completed in Spring 2001. 

• Repairs were made to the Hussey's Pond Dam off Poor Street at a cost of 
$95,000. 

• School Zone Warning Signals were installed on Bartlet Street for $17,160. 

• Assisted in collecting field data and reviewing preliminary check sheets for the 
implementation of the Town-wide Geographic Information Mapping System 
(GIS). 

• Inspections and tests were performed on ten active subdivisions, ten industrial site 
developments, and several hundred roadway utility cuts. 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

• Was awarded two grants, totaling $ 1 8,686, by the Massachusetts Board of Library 
Commissioners in the areas of Information Literacy and Material Preservation. 

• Created an on-line "Community Bulletin" for all non-profit groups in Andover to 
post their events. 

• Making the transition, along with the other 29 libraries in the Merrimack Valley 
Library Consortium, to a new on-line, web-based automation system that will 
allow greater use of library resources for library patrons both in the library and at 
home. 



13 



FTNANCF A. BTTDCFT DFPARTMFNT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 

FTNANCF ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2001 Budget was released on February 4, 
2000. During the months of February, March, and April more than 20 meetings were held with the 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and department heads to review the budget and warrant 
article requests and prepare recommendations for the Annual Town Meeting. 

On April 10, 2000 the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 11,300 households. 
The Annual Town Meeting began on April 24, 2000 and the Fiscal Year 2001 operating budget 
(Article 4) was adopted in the amount of $92,177,495. This budget was an increase of 5.8% from 
the fiscal year 2000 operating budget of $87,158,741. 

Some of the major accomplishments for 2000 follow: 

• Town and School staff continued to work on implementing the new integrated finance and 
account software system for payroll, accounts payable, revenue and general ledger. 

• With the approval of the Board of Selectmen, the department prepared a bond issue of 
$9,675,000 for various capital projects. After a presentation by staff, Moody's Investor 
Service raised Andover's bond rating to Aaa (the highest rating possible). Only ten other 
Massachusetts municipalities have a bond rating of Aaa. Nationally, only eighty-four 
municipalities have an Aaa rating. The lowest bid on the December bond issue was 
awarded at 4.7779% interest rate. 

• Prepared the Five- Year Capital Improvement Plan for FY-2002 - FY-2006. 

• Provided twenty-six Microsoft training classes (Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access) for 
110 employees. 

• The Town's web site: www.town.andover.ma.ns continued to expand and provide more 
information, links and data to the public. New material included the 2000 Town Meeting 
Warrant, the 2000 Recommended Budget, the 2000 Town Meeting results, Community 
Services course catalogs, "Our Town" summer job applications and Assessor's property 
valuation data. 

ASSFSSOR 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for the valuing of all real estate and personal property 
accounts in the Town and motor vehicle excise taxes as well as defending all appeals of all of these 

14 



taxes. The three-member Board is also responsible for the awarding of nearly 350 property tax 
exemptions on an annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled veterans, 
widows and widowers, and individuals classified as blind. 

The Board of Assessors also must conduct revaluations of all property on a triennial (every 
three years) basis. The next required revaluation will be conducted for Fiscal Year 2003 bit if 
needed interim adjustment may be made for Fiscal Year 2002. The Board is responsible for 
meeting all Massachusetts Department of Revenue guidelines for property valuations, reporting of 
valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amounts of property and ownership related 
information that is available to the general public. Exterior digital photos are now recorded on 
most property and the total valuations are available on the Town's web site. More than 1,000 
requests for public records and information are received and processed on an annual basis. 

CENT RAL P URCH AS ING 

In 2000 the Central Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,612 purchase orders 
and 2,389 requests for payment for the Town, and 4,098 purchase orders for the School 
Department. During this period there were approximately 116 bids and 5 requests for proposals 
that were advertised and officially opened. The continued utilization of the State bid contracts 
available to cities and towns has provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Throughout 2000 Andover has initiated a number of Cooperative Bids as well as 
participated in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts General 
Laws, two or more political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through the 
bidding process. Some of the items purchased were: xerographic paper for copy machines, road 
salt, water treatment chemicals, fuel oils, vehicle fuels, HVAC services, plumbing services, 
electrical services, elevator services, office supplies, equipment and furniture, and school athletic 
and student voluntary insurance. 

Some of the major requests for proposals and bids solicited in 2000 were: 

• Design and Construction Administration for Memorial Hall Library Renovations and 

HVAC Project 

Insurance Package for Town and School 
Modular Ambulance Type I EHD for Andover Fire Department 
Unit Ventilator Replacement for Sanborn Elementary School 
New Public Safety Center 
Sewer Construction - Beacon Street 
New Elementary and Middle Schools 
In-Line Hockey Rink System 

One (1) 2000 or Current Model Articulating Front-End Wheel Loader 
River Street Bridge Reconstruction 
Rescue Pumper for Andover Fire Department 
Two (2) Model Year 2001 Heavy Duty Dump Chassis with Dump Body must be at least 



15 



66,400 GVW 

Removal and Replacement of Existing Roofing, Flashing and Related Work at the West 

Middle School 

Furnish and Install Irrigation System in The Park at the Town Offices 

Direct Digital Control Expansion for West Elementary School 

Structural Repairs Hussey's Pond Dam 

Real Property Acquisition for Active and Passive Recreation and Other Municipal 

Purposes 

Request for Proposals for Construction of a Youth Center on Town-Owned Land at 

Greenwood Road By a Non-Profit Organization 

Sidewalk Reconstruction 

Two (2) Four Wheel Drive Backhoe Loaders with Extendable Dippersticks 

UHF Multi-Channel Portable Radio Units and Accessories for Andover Fire Department 

Burnham Road-Dufton Road Water Mains 

Four (4) New 2000 or Current Model Marked Law Enforcement Full Size Sedans and 

One (1) New 2000 or Current Model Administrative law Enforcement Full Size Sedan 

Bridle Path Pump Station Modifications 

Sewerage Work Improvements Contract 

Direct Digital Controls Expansion for Memorial Hall Library, Doherty School, Town 

House and Shawsheen School 

The Office of Central Purchasing is also responsible for administering the contract 
compliance of Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan as well as coordinates the Property and 
Casualty insurance and risk management for all Town and School Departments. The Human 
Resources Department, however, handles the Health and personal insurance for both Town and 
School Departments. Central Purchasing processed approximately 46 casualty and property 
claims over the year with 28 of these claims resulting in $78,901.24 being recovered for the 
Town. 

COT I FCTOR/TRF ASTIRFR 

The Collector/Treasurer's Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. Some of the highlights for 2000 are as follows: 

• Collected and processed several old outstanding tax title accounts. 

• Successfully processed over 50,000 real estate and personal property bills and payments as 
well as 30,000 excise tax bills and payments. 

Borrowed $9,675,000 at a low rate of 4.7779%. 

• Helped to improve Andover' s bond rating to Aaa. 

• Continued to review new payroll and revenue systems which occupied a lot of time testing 
and proving procedures and reports. 

• Significant time was spent disposing of a foreclosed property on Lincoln Street. 

Dollars for Scholars is a national non-profit organization that formed an Andover chapter in 
1997 with the acceptance of Article 27 at the 1997 annual Town Meeting. 



16 



During 2000 several fundraising events were held and donations received from many 
Andover residents that resulted in 38 scholarships awarded in the amount of $40,900 to deserving 
Andover students pursuing their further education. 

Balance: January 1 , 2000 $76,985 

Income, Donations, Gifts 65,890 

Expenses, Scholarships 50,529 

Balance: December 3 1 , 2000 $92,346 

INFORM ATTON SYSTEMS 

The Information Systems Division is responsible for hardware, software and computerized 
data used in municipal operations including financial records, word processing documents, 
electronic transmission and other varied electronic files. This Division supports all users of the 
network and strives to meet the many diversified needs of Town government administration. 

Highlights for 2000 include: 

• Successfully completed the rollout/conversion to the Microsoft Office Suite for all town 
computer users. 

• Increased the amount of information available on the town website, including the 
Assessor's database and the Community Services registration booklets. 

• Performed various hardware/software/printer upgrades to eliminate the use of outdated 
equipment and the associated maintenance fees. 



17 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



r 

32,000 
31,900 
31,800 
31,700 
31,600 
31,500 
31,400 
31,300 
31,200 
31,100 


Motor Vehicle Bills 


> 






yS 




/ 




/S 




/ 




S 
















1998 1999 2000 







Purchase Orders 




■< 


6,000 












! 


5,800 






i 








5,600 






i 








5,400 






i 






i 


5,200 






i 






H 


5,000 






! 






4,800 






1 






i 


4,600 






| 


1998 1999 


2000 










4 



1500000 



1250000 



1000000 



750000 



Investment Income 



1998 



1999 



2000 



12,100 

12,090 

C 12,080 

t 

| 12,070 

S 12,060 

12,050 

12,040 



Property Tax Bills 




1998 



1999 



2000 



18 



TAX RATE RECAP 



EXPENDITURES 

Appropriations & Articles 

Other Local Expenditures: 

Tax Title Purposes 

Final Court Judgements 

Overlay/ Other Deficits 

Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 
Total Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 
Overlay Reserve for Abatements 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

EST. RECEIPTS & OTHER REVENUE 

Estimated Receipts from State: 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Charges 

Total from State 

Estimated Local Receipts: 

Local Estimated Receipts 

Offset Receipts 

Enterprise Funds 

Revolving Funds (53e 1/2) 
Total Local Receipts 

Free Cash and Other Revenue: 

Free Cash - Articles 

Other Available Funds 
Total Other Appropriations 

Free Cash - Operating Budget 

Total Estimated Receipts 
Total Property Taxes 

TOTAL REVENUES 



FY1999 


FY2000 


FY2001 


$84,013,091 


$90,543,749 


$94,792,161 


40,000 


5,000 














222,026 


134,632 


140,580 


60.847 


71.235 


71.033 


322,873 


210,867 


211,613 


953,160 


978,837 


1 ,045,448 


916.444 


915.104 


1.000.840 


$86,205,568 


$92,648,557 


$97,050,062 


$8,508,402 


$9,473,948 


10,671,332 


5.390 





10.107 


8,513,792 


9,473,948 


10,681,439 


6,281,000 


7,136,000 


7,409,850 


1,181,725 


1,154,247 


1 ,335,375 


8,001,185 


8,754,691 


9,534,424 











15,463,910 


17,044,938 


18,279,649 


1,828,435 


2,947,008 


1,760,319 


2.017.957 


239.560 


347.229 


3,846,392 


3,186,568 


2,107,548 


300,000 


1 ,204,000 


1,050,000 


28,124,094 


30,909,454 


32,118,636 


58.081.474 


61.739.103 


64.931.426 


$86,205,568 


$92,648,557 


$97,050,062 



VALUATIONS AND 
TAX RATES 

TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 
RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 
COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 
EQUALIZED TAX RATE 



FY1999 


FY2000 


FY2001 


$3,472,883 


$3,867,601 


$3,972,909 


15.17 


14.65 


14.92 


21.74 


20.11 


20.59 


16.72 


15.96 


16.34 



19 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE FUNDS 

Statement of Revenues, Expense and Changes in Fund Equity 
Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2000 



OPERATING REVENUES 

Charges for Services 

OPERATING EXPENSES 

Cost of Services and Administration 

Debt Service-Principal 

Debt Service-Interest 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES 

OPERATING INCOME (LOSS) 

NONOPERATING REVENUES 

Intergovernmental 

Investment Income 

TOTAL NON-OPERATING REVENUES 

NET INCOME BEFORE TRANSFERS 



Water Enterprise 


Sewer Enterprise 


$6,893,291 


$2,720,505 


2,443,038 


1,288,967 


1,615,750 


729,450 


570.575 


241.006 


4,629,363 


2,259,423 


2,263,928 


461,082 





43,948 


119.609 


39.535 


119,609 


83,483 


2,383,537 


544,565 



OPERATING TRANSFERS 

Transfers out 

Indirect costs transfer out 

TOTAL OPERATING TRANSFERS 



(716.129) 
(716,129) 



(90,000) 
(180.689) 
(270,689) 



NET INCOME(LOSS) 



1,667,408 



273,876 



RETAINED EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES 

Beginning of Fiscal Year 



$1,998,444 



$866,897 



RETAINED EARNINGS/FUND BALANCES 

End of Fiscal Year 



$3,665,852 



$1,140,773 



From Town of Andover Annual Audit Report for Fiscal Year ending June 30, 2000 (Powers and Sullivan, CPA) 



20 



WATER AND SEWER DEBT SERVICE- FY 2000 



WATER DEBT 




ADVANCE REFUNDING 


ART1A, 1987 


ADVANCE REFUNDING 


ART1A, 1987 


WATER MAIN CONST 


ART 37, 1987 


WATER MAIN CONST 


ART 46, 1992 


BANCROFT PUMPING ST 


ART 53, 1992 


TREATMENT PLANT 


ART 1A, 1987 


WATER MAIN 


ART 46, 1992 


BANCROFT PUMPING ST 


ART 53, 1992 


ADVANCE REFUNDING 


ART 1A, 1987 


ADVANCE REFUNDING 


ART 1A, 1987 


ADVANCE REFUNDING 


ART1A, 1987 


WATER BONDS 


ART 37, 1987 


WATER MAINS 


ART 46, 1992 


WATER PLANNING 


ART 53, 1994 


WATER PLANT IMPROVEMENTS 


ART 32, 1995 


WATER MAINS 


ART 33, 1995 


FISH BROOK IMPROVEMENTS 


ART 31,1995 


WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 


ART 46,1992 


WATER PUMP ST. REPAIR 


ART 46,1993 


WATER TRMT PLANT IMP 


ART 32, 1995 


WATER MAIN CONSTRUCTION 


ART 46, 1992 


WATER DIST IMPROVEMENT 


ART 24, 1996 


WATER DIST IMPROVEMENT 


ART 24, 1996 


WATER MAINS 


ART 61, 1998 


FISH BROOK 


ART 63, 1998 



PRINCIPAL 

232,500.00 
54,250.00 
35,000.00 

180,000.00 
55,000.00 
15,000.00 
65,000.00 
65,000.00 
67,000.00 

313,000.00 

40,000.00 
14,000.00 
40,000.00 
50,000.00 
55,000.00 
25,000.00 
15,000.00 
10,000.00 
50,000.00 
25,000.00 
120,000.00 
20,000.00 
45,000.00 
25,000.00 
1,615,750.00 



INTEREST 

7,556.25 

4,751.38 

9,575.00 

41,335.00 

11,357.50 

615 

8,350.00 

7,450.00 

105,695.00 

57,291.00 

23,401.00 

43,268.00 

14,436.51 

975 

15,312.50 

44,838.75 

14,018.75 

7,138.75 

5,607.50 

19,250.00 

9,025.00 

74,835.00 

9,677.50 

20,315.00 

14,500.00 

570,575.39 



SEWER DEBT 
SANITARY SEWER 
SEWER- NORTH STREET 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
ADVANCE REFUNDING 
SEWER PILGRIM/PIONEER 
SEWER MAYFLOWER 
SEWER PLANS 
SEWER BROOK/CHESTNUT 
PLANS - ROGERS BROOK 
SEWER BALMORAL 
SEWER PLANS SO MAIN ST 
SEWER PLANS ROGERS BROOK 
SEWER PLANS FOREST HILLS 
SEWER CONST BEACON ST 



ART 18, 1985 
ART 41, 1991 
A21 ,84/26,85 
ART 28, 1989 
ART 28, 1989 
ART 32, 1997 
ART 35, 1997 
ART 31,1998 
ART 33, 1998 
ART 34, 1998 
ART 51, 1998 
ART 31, 1998 
ART 34, 1998 
ART 20, 1999 
ART 43, 1999 



PRINCIPAL 

34,000.00 

30,000.00 

230,000.00 

60,450.00 

20,000.00 
15,000.00 
260,000.00 
15,000.00 
60,000.00 
5,000.00 



729,450.00 



INTEREST 

1,105.00 

6,195.00 

75,900.00 

5,272.28 

16,973.00 

7,227.50 

13,467.50 

49,920.00 

15,990.00 

11,520.00 

4,320.00 

16,992.50 

4,855.00 

6,068.75 

5,199.38 

241,005.91 



21 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 2000, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before state courts and 
administrative boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to the Town 
officials. Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended 
by Town Counsel. 

Special Town Counsel was involved in the extensive proceedings at the Energy Facilities 
Siting Board regarding the proposed power plant in Dracut. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on 
almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all articles of the warrant and attended all Town 
Meetings. During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and 
numerous deeds, easements, releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. Special 
Legislation authorized by Town Meeting was drafted. 

Significant amendments to the Rules and Regulations for the Subdivision of Land were 
adapted by the Planning Board. New regulations were adopted by the Zoning Board of Appeals. 
A lawsuit challenging the award of the construction contract for the new elementary and middle 
schools was dismissed. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court upheld the tax taking of 
property on Fosters Pond. 



22 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerks Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town s democratic 
process, to maintain and preserve public records and to act in the best interest of the community and 
the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality services. 



During the year 2000, the Town Clerk's Office managed a Town Election, a Special Town 
Election, three State Elections, a Town Meeting and a Special Town Meeting. In preparing for each 
Election/Town Meeting, continued training was given to the Town's election officials in an on-going 
effort to improve the Town's Election and Town Meeting procedures. 

DEPARTMENT STATISTICS : 

The Town Census was mailed to 11,260 households in January, 1999. The Town's 
population at the completion of the census was 30, 251. 

Elections in 2000 provided the following registered voter results: 



Election 


Date 


No. of Voters 


% of Voters 


Presidential Primary 


March 7, 2000 


7,154 


37% 


Town Election 


March 28, 2000 


2,950 


15% 


Special Town Election 


May 23, 2000 


4,607 


23% 


State Primary 


September 19, 2000 


1,507 


8% 


State Election 


November 7, 2000 


16,513 


85% 



The year ended with 19,874 registered voters and was divided into eight precincts as follows: 



Precinct 1: 2,185 


Precinct 4: 


2,521 




Precinct 7: 


2,340 




Precinct 2: 2,639 


Precinct 5: 


2,747 




Precinct 8: 


2,546 




Precinct 3: 2,292 


Precinct 6: 


2,604 


1998 


1999 




2000 


Births Recorded: 






345 


341 




328 


Marriages Recorded: 






174 


177 




187 


Deaths Recorded: 






258 


261 




277 


Dog Licenses Sold: 






2041 


2147 




2321 


Fishing & Hunting Licenses Sold: 




560 


454 




379 


Business Certificates Filed: 






112 


148 




115 


Uniform Commercial Code Filings: 




514 


594 




734 


New Voter Registrations: 






1689 


1348 




2398 



23 



MONIES COLLECTED: 



1998 



1999 



2000 



Marriage Licenses 

Certified Copies: 

Uniform Commercial Code Filings: 

Miscellaneous License Income: 

Liquor Licenses Income: 

Business Certificate Filings: 

Miscellaneous Income: 

Dog Licenses: 

Non-Criminal Violations: 

Copies of Public Records: 

Fishing & Hunting Licenses: 



2,655.00 
11,313.50 

5,861.00 
11,955.00 
97,345.00 

2,630.00 

6,108.55 

14,469.00 

790.00 

543.20 



2,670.00 
10,619.50 

7,032.00 

12,615.00 

101,025.00 

3,605.00 

4,845.40 

18,911.00 

720.00 

315.30 



2,855.00 
11,311.50 

9,269.40 
13,850.00 
98,105.00 

2,880.00 

4,597.30 

17,045.00 

605.00 

367.40 



12,880.20 * 11,271.75 ** 10,343.55 *** 



TOTAL MONIES COLLECTED: $166,550.45 $173,629.95 $171,229.15 



$12,658.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $221 .45 was 
retained by the Town of Andover. 

$11 ,079.00 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $192.75 was 
retained by the Town of Andover. 



*** $10,170.75 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife and $172.80 was 
retained by the Town of Andover. 



** 



24 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The Building Division 's mission is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the Town 's 
residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic 
structures in the Town through the enforcement of State and local laws, by-laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, Architectural Access Board Rules and Regulations, 
521 CMR, The Zoning Act, Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings, 
Section 36, Ballard Vale Historic District Bylaw and Section 37, Chimneys, of Article XII of the 
Town of Andover Code of Bylaws, as well as other applicable Town and State laws and 
regulations. The Building Division reviews all documentation (plans and specifications) 
submitted with applications for permits and issues all permits required for construction and other 
applicable activities for which permits are required by law. The Division performs all required 
site inspections as well as Code mandated safety inspections. The Building Division responds to 
customer inquiries, complaints and emergencies. Finally, the Building Division assists other 
Divisions of the Department of Community Development and Planning, as needed, in their 
permit processing and enforcement and attends, when necessary, Zoning Board of Appeals, 
Planning Board and other Commission meetings. 

BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICAL INFORMATION 



Permit Type 


1998 


1999 


2000 


New Dwellings 


68 


55 


58 


Additions/Alterations to Single 
Family Dwellings 


699 


715 


719 


New Multi-Family Dwellings 


1 


4 


3 


Additions/Alterations to Multi- 
Family Dwellings 


13 


21 


43 


New Commercial & Industrial 
Buildings 


1 


11 


6 


Additions/Alterations to 
Commercial and Industrial 
Buildings 


138 


128 


130 


Schools/Public Buildings 


32 


36 


10 


Swimming Pools 


29 


26 


35 


Signs, Chimneys, Woodburning 
Stoves, Raze Permits 


154 


191 


173 


Certificates of Inspection 


35 


21 


34 


Total Fees Collected 


$458,506 


$760,895 


$935,464 


Total Estimated Value 


$59,998,444 


$101,562,600 


$164,816,278 



25 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the 
investigation of accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for 
lighting, power, fire alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of 
equipment for emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards 
and similar equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code 
and inspects the corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various 
electric companies that service the area. 



1998 



1999 



2000 



Electrical Permits 
Fees Collected 



1,178 
$66,244 



1,238 
$109,699 



1,279 
$120,502 



PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING 

All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the 
Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. Inspections are conducted as necessary to ensure 
compliance with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 



1998 



Plumbing Permits 
Plumbing Fees Collected 
Gas Permits 
Gas Fees Collected 



1999 



2000 



850 


786 


905 


$32,443 


$41,648 


$47,029 


605 


508 


747 


$13,810 


$13,334 


$17,876 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and 
the Town Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in Memorial 
Hall at the Memorial Library, Elm Square. Five regular members and four associate members 
are appointed by the Board of Selectmen. The public hearings by the Board are the result of 
applications in the following areas: 



26 



• A variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

• A special permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

• A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other 
Administrative official; or 

• Permission to construct low or moderate income housing within the Town of 
Andover (Comprehensive Permit). 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. Public 
hearings are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and 
Regulations. Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view 
each property in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence 
presented at the hearing, and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the 
Town Clerk and the Registry of Deeds. 





1997 


1998 


1999 


2000 


Number of Regular Meetings 


13 


13 


12 


13 


Deliberation Meetings 


13 


16 


14 


15 


Petitions Filed 


122/128* 


110/120* 


115/122* 


106/119* 


Petitions Granted 


101 


103 


92 


99 


Petitions Denied 


17 


15 


17 


10 


Petitions Withdrawn or Dismissed or 
Continued 


10 


10 


13 


10 


Fees Collected 


$15,494 


$19,075 


$12,832 


$21,286 



*Some petitions contained requests for both variances and special permits. 



27 



TYPICAL NEW SINGLE FAMILY 
RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION - 2000 




£tj^ ^ ^^^^ *?rr ,T|jl ^^^^^<^\_ 



"~ J — ~ " • imff** ' mm^" 









'iS^SZTi-. '■'—■ r ~" ' "■ 



28 



A TYPICAL HOME ADDITION & RENOVATION - 2000 




Summer - Construction Begins 




Fall - Exterior and Interior Work Progressing 




Winter - The Final Result 



29 



BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICS 



70 
65 
60 
55 
50 
45 
40 



SINGLE FAMILY 
NEW DWELLINGS 



1998 



1999 



2000 



J 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 




1998 



1999 



2000 





BUILDING PERMITS 




i 


1,220 
1,200 
1,180 
1,160 










s 


/ 


y 












1,140 
















1,120 
















1,100 










1998 


1999 


2000 













f 


PERMIT FEES 




> 


$1,000,000 












1 


$900,000 






I 








$800,000 






i 






i 


$700,000 














$600,000 






| 








$500,000 












i 


$400,000 






i 


1998 1999 


2000 





30 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 



The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover=s natural resources and 
to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town=s conservation land. 

The Conservation Commission acquired approximately 21 acres of land for conservation 
purposes. Approximately 1 ,750 acres of land are under the control and custody of the Commission 
for conservation purposes. 



Conservation Commission Meetings 

Pre-filing Conferences 

Public Hearings & Public Meetings 

Abbreviated Notices of Resource Area Delineation 

Orders of Conditions Issued 

Amended Orders of Conditions Issued 

Certificates of Compliance Issued 

Determinations of Applicability Issued 

Notification of Satisfactory Completion of Work 

Findings of Significance Issued 

Enforcement Orders Issued 

Emergency Certifications 

Acres of Conservation Land Acquired 

Conservation Restrictions Established 

Wetland Filing Fees Collected 

Expenditures from Conservation Fund 



1998 



1999 



2000 



22 


26 


20 




25 


18 


374 


266 


219 




6 


3 


40 


25 


27 


7 


6 


8 


23 


57 


21 


153 


113 


118 


44 


34 


28 


68 


55 


45 


9 


4 


4 


6 


8 


4 


8.5 


59 


21 











$14,389 


$8,618 


$4,179 


$1,360,000 


$14,000 


$40,000 



31 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division encompasses all phases of health administration, including planning, evaluation, 
budgeting, enforcement, inspection andpseudo adjudicatory proceedings. The Sanitarians supervise 
the inspection and public health education programs in matters dealing with State Sanitary Code and 
the State Environmental Code. The Public Health Nurse is primarily responsible for all medical 
clinical administrative matters. The Director of Public Health assumes primary responsibility for 
coordination among the various boards in permit granting and proper land use, specifically in the 
area of environmental protection issues (i.e. septic system design, wetland pollution, water quality 
protection). The Director designs programs and implements policies as proposed by the Andover 
Board of Health to meet the health needs of the community. The Board of Health consists of three 
volunteer members appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. 

ACTIVITY REPORT 









1998 


1999 


2000 


Board of Health Meetings 






11 


12 


12 


Plan Reviews 






287 


168 


147 


Restaurant Inspections 






232 


203 


224 


Complaints & Investigations 






245 


147 


185 


Administrative Hearings 






6 


3 


7 


Court Actions 






4 


3 


5 


Fees Collected 






$95,162 


$80,101 


$80,110 






CLINIC REPORT 












1998 


1999 


2000 


Outreach Clinics 






34 


27 


21 


Attendance 






372 


334 


215 


Senior Center Clinics 






50 


51 


51 


Attendance 






687 


868 


831 


Office Visits 






99 


120 


132 


Home Visits 






4 


9 


12 


Influenza Immunization 






1324 


1650 


1163* 


Pneumonia Immunization 






51 


83 


76 


*Due to vaccine shortage and delay 


in distribution 






Cholesterol Screening Clinics 






9 


9 


9 


Attendance 






120 


100 


98 


Mantoux Tuberculin testing Attendance 




96 


99 


86 


Positive Reactor Follow Up 






13 


12 


6 


T.B. Clinic Case History, Appi 


aintments & Follow Up 


9 


10 


22 



32 



CLINIC REPORT (CONTINUED) 

1998 1999 



Hepatitis B Immunization Climes - Hepatitis B Vaccine 
Doherty Middle School 
West Middle School 
Andover High School 

Total 

NON-COMMUNICABLE REPORTABLE DISEASES 



265 

218 

89 

572 



193 

167 

84 

444 



2000 



185 

127 
57 

369 



Other Mycobacterium 

*A Typical Mycobacteria Avium 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



1998 



*1 



1999 



2000 



1998 



1999 



2000 



Animal Bites 

Chicken Pox 

Campylobacter 

Cyclospora 

E.coli0157.H7 

Giardia 

Hepatitis A 

Hepatitis B 

Hepatitis C 

Lyme Disease 

Pertussis 

Measles (Rubeola) 

Meningitis (Bacterial) 

Meningitis (Viral) 

Salmonella 

Shigella 

Strep Pneumonia 

Tuberculosis 

Legionella 

Yersinia Entercolitica 



33 


21 


33 


15 


7 


5 


7 


3 


5 











1 


1 


1 


3 


13 


1 





2 


2 


5 


4 


8 


1 


5 


9 


3 


2 


5 


3 


3 


2 











4 








4 








4 


4 


8 





1 





1 


1 














1 








1 









HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO AWARENESS PROGRAM 

www.breathefree.org ; www.smokefreegeneration.org 

The mission of the Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program is to educate 
community residents about the health risks of smoking; eliminate youth access to tobacco; promote 
the health of residents, particularly children, by reducing public exposure to secondhand smoke; and 
provide free quit smoking classes. 



33 



Program Overview : 

Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program is a collaborative between the Andover 
Board of Health and the Boards of Health in five other communities (Dracut, Methuen, Middleton, 
North Andover and Topsfield). The Program works to promote and enforce policies and regulations 
to protect the public from exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, promote and enforce 
regulations to eliminate youth access to tobacco products, and educate the community about the 
health risks of smoking. 

The Program staff, which consists of a Program Director, a Tobacco Control Specialist and a 
Youth Access Coordinator, conducts enforcement activities, provides technical assistance around 
policy development and implementation, and conducts public education and outreach activities. 
Healthy Communities is funded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health's Tobacco 
Control Program with the 25 cent excise tax on cigarettes. 

Since the inception of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control Program in 1992, statistics show the 
program is achieving success in reaching its goals: 

• Adult smoking prevalence in Massachusetts declined from 22.6% in 1 993 to 20.9% in 1 999. 

This means that there were approximately 80,000 fewer adult smokers in 1999 than in 1993. 
(Abt Associates, Inc., Independent Evaluation of the Massachusetts Tobacco Control 
Program, 1999) 

• Adult smokers are smoking less. Smokers reported smoking 15.6 cigarettes a day in 1999 
which is a 20% reduction from the average of 19.7 cigarettes a day in 1993. The average 
smoker in Massachusetts smoked almost 1 ,500 fewer cigarettes in 1 999 than in 1 993 . (Ibid) 

• Per capita cigarette purchases continue to decline more rapidly in Massachusetts than in the 
rest of the nation. Annual purchases dropped from 118 packs per adult in 1 992 to 80 packs 
in 1999. This 32% decline in Massachusetts compares to an 8% decline in the rest of the 
United States (excluding California, which began a similar statewide tobacco control 
program in 1989). (Ibid) 



• 



Massachusetts youth are less likely to smoke. The overall smoking rate among 
Massachusetts high school students declined again from 1997 to 1999. Current smoking 
among 9 th grade students dropped by 22% and dropped 6% among 12 th grade students. (Ibid) 

Smokeless tobacco use among youth has been cut in half. The rate of smokeless tobacco use 
among high school students fell from 9.4% in 1995 to 4.9% in 1999. 

Massachusetts leads the nation in enforcement of regulations on sales to minors. 
Massachusetts ranked second among U.S. states for both the number of inspections and the 
percentage of merchants inspected. (Joseph R. DiFranza. Are the Federal and State 
Governments Complying with the SYNAR Amendment? Archives of Pediatric and 
Adolescent Medicine. 1999;153:1089-1097) 



34 



• Three quarters of Massachusetts residents are protected by local restrictions on smoking in 
restaurants. (Abt Associates, Inc., Independent Evaluation of the Massachusetts Tobacco 
Control Program, 1999) 

• 39% of Massachusetts households ban smoking inside the home. (Ibid) 

Enforcement of regulations prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to minors : 

Despite the strides in reducing youth smoking rates, youth access to tobacco products is still a 
critically important issue for our communities. The following is an overview of monitoring activities 
by Healthy Communities Tobacco Awareness Program throughout the 6 communities of its service 
area and reflects the compliance rates (the percentage of retailers found to be in compliance with 
youth access regulations) during the past 3 fiscal years. 



100 
80 
60 
40 
20 



01 i i r- 

FY-98 FY-99 FY-00 
(99.5%) (90.3%) (90.7%) 



Surveys conducted in June 2000 in Northeast Massachusetts found that: 

• Almost 85% of teen smokers surveyed stated it was "easy" or "very easy" to get tobacco 
products. 

• 40%) of teen smokers claimed their parents did not know that they smoke. 

• 58%) of teen smokers reported they had tried to quit smoking in the past six months. 

In addition to working to educate tobacco retailers and conduct compliance checks, Healthy 
Communities staff works to educate the community about the importance of youth access issues and 
to promote community ownership of the issue. This is imperative since social sources of tobacco are 
as prevalent or more prevalent than commercial sources. The June 2000 youth survey found that 
64.8% obtain their tobacco through social sources such as asking an adult to buy for them or 
borrowing from a friend compared to 35.1% who reported purchasing their tobacco from a store or 
gas station. 

Public support for Smoke-free regulations : 

Resident surveys conducted in four of Healthy Communities' municipalities demonstrate a 
high level of community support for smoke-free restaurant regulations. Findings in Andover 
included the following: 

• 89.3%o request non-smoking seating when dining out in restaurants. 

• 80%o favor completely smoke-free restaurants. 



35 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of the 
Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the recommendations of 
the Master Plan. 

Throughout 2000 the Planning Division continued its efforts toward downtown 
improvements and work on major transportation system projects. By the end of the year the $2.5 
million Main Street Improvement Project had made significant progress toward 25% plans and a 
committee had been appointed to play an advisory role in streetscape design. Work also continued on 
transportation projects such as River Road, Dascomb Road and Burtt Road. Staff also assisted in 
developing the scope of two major studies which were commenced at year's end; one for the 1-93 
corridor in Andover and Methuen and the other for improvements to the Ballardvale and Andover 
MBTA commuter stations. 

During 2000, the Planning Division staff continued its work on the development of a 
sophisticated Geographic Information System (GIS) and by year's end the Division's Senior Planner 
had formally taken on the role as GIS Coordinator. Significant progress was made on building the 
data layers of the system which when completed will provide the Town with a significantly enhanced 
record keeping and retrieval system for our land use and infrastructure data. By the end of 2000 the 
major undertaking of re-codifying the Town's Zoning By-laws was nearing completion and being 
readied for approval at the 2001 Annual Town Meeting. 

Development activities in the industrial areas, which had experienced a sharp increase in the 
previous year, had leveled off but still continued at a steady pace. The year 2000 saw an increase in 
hotel development with one new hotel completed and two under construction. A third hotel project is 
awaiting construction under a new owner. The year also saw the construction of the Town's first 
multi-level parking garages - one at the Genetics Institute facility in Lowell Junction and another at 
Brickstone Square in Shawsheen. 



1998 



1999 



2000 



Planning Board Meetings 
Public Hearings Held 
Definitive Subdivision Plans 
Preliminary Subdivision Plans 
ANR Plans 
Site Plan Reviews 
Special Permits Issued 
Lot Releases and Clearance 

Certificates issued 
Warrant Articles Reported 
Street Acceptances 
Subdivision Guarantees 
Revenues Generated 



26 


22 


26 


70 


96 


57 


7 


10 


8 


6 


7 


6 


28 


35 


26 


7 


1 


6 


22 


28 


14 


72 


80 


57 


39 


37 


41 


7 


2 


9 


$242,264 


$263,053 


$189,000 


$182,976 


$135,768 


$70,276 



36 



PUBLIC HEALTH AND PLANNING STATISTICS 



120 
100 
80 
60 
40 
20 




PLANNING BOARD 
PUBLIC HEARINGS 



1998 



1999 



2000 



40 
35 
30 
25 
20 
15 
10 
5 




PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 



. -*-. 



1998 



1999 



-♦^Preliminary Subdivision - - 
-A- - ANR Plans 



2000 
■ Definitive Subdivision 



J 



PUBLIC HEALTH 
COMPLAINTS & INVESTIGATIONS 



300 



250 



200 



150 



100 



1998 



1999 



2000 



4,000 
3,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 



PUBLIC HEALTH 
TOTAL CLINIC ATTENDANCE* 




1998 



1999 



2000 



2000 attendance down due to vaccine shortage and delay in distribution 



37 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant and Facilities Department is to provide responsive and cost 
effective maintenance services to all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle 
maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas within their responsibility. 

The Plant and Facilities Department provides scheduled and non-routine maintenance 
services to all Town and School buildings, parks and grounds, cemetery, forestry and vehicle 
operations. Additionally, the Department is responsible for the following: 

• Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 
construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 
Town and School building and field rental functions and the Town House (Old Town Hall). 
Managing the Town's fuel depot. 
Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 
Custodial services to all Town buildings. 
Traffic lights. 

Trash pickup at Town and School buildings. 
Town-owned street lighting. 
Town switchboard operations. 
Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Plant and Facilities Department is managed by a Director who is supported by three 
Superintendents, an Administrative Assistant, Construction Project Manager, Vehicle 
Maintenance Foreman, Work Control Center Coordinator, Purchasing/Inventory Coordinator, 
Accounts Payable Clerk, part-time Telephone Operator/Receptionists and a diverse group of 
skilled and semi-skilled maintenance trades persons, vehicle mechanics, grounds and tree 
workers, and custodians. 

ADMINISTRATION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Major Capital Projects: 

New Elementary/Middle School - Construction started September 2000, site cleared, site 

work and blasting underway, footings and foundations started, project on schedule. 

Public Safety Center - Construction contract signed September 2000, site work in process, 

project 3 months behind schedule. Off site accommodations at Spring Grove Cemetery, 

West Fire Station and Town Yard in process. 

Senior Center - Site investigation and utilities agreement completed. 

• Memorial Hall Library Renovations - Design work complete, construction bids due 
February, 2001. 



38 



1,158 


1,472 


1,400 


2,552 


2,909 


3,016 


3,710 


4,381 


4,416* 



Support Functions ' 

New computerized fuel system installed at Town Yard fuel depot. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISION 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, 
carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings which total in excess of 1 .2 
million square feet. Additionally, they provide custodial services to Town buildings, mail 
delivery to all buildings, maintain traffic signals and Town-owned street light poles and manage 
all building-related capital projects. 

During Calendar Year 2000 these two divisions completed 4,381 work orders. 

1998 1999 2000 

Town 

School 

Total 

* Does not include 247 work orders that were used to track Town and School capital 
projects. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE DIVISION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

New roofs installed at the Library and Town Office buildings. 

Painted exterior of Ballardvale Fire Station. 

Renovated old cemetery building, built new cemetery garage building. 

West Fire Station sewer line installed. 

Extensive interior painting at Town House (Old Town Hall). 

Remodeled office area Community Development and Planning Department. 

Remodeled Information Systems office area third floor Town Offices. 

New computer training room - third floor of School Administration Building. 

New carpeting installed in technology area third floor of School Administration Building. 

New floor tiles installed first and second floor main hallways and room All at Doherty 

Middle School. 

New bathroom petitions installed in two boys bathrooms at Doherty Middle School. 

Built two new classrooms for Doherty Middle School in School Administration Building - 

third floor area. 

Re-keyed all of Doherty Middle School and installed ADA compliant door handles. 

Repainted classrooms, offices, bathrooms and other areas at Doherty Middle, Bancroft, 

High School, Sanborn, West Middle and Shawsheen Schools and Collins Center. 

Installed new carpeting lower hallways, corner classrooms and main office area - Bancroft 

School. 

Remodeled two first grade bathrooms at West Elementary School. 



39 



New carpet classroom near main office at West Elementary School. 

High School - 138 new classroom windows installed and new cafeteria windows installed. 

New interior security gates installed at High School. 

New carpeting in band and choral rooms at High School. 

Installed new magnetic door hold open devices in High School main corridors. 

Stripped and repainted main flagpole structure at High School. 

Exterior parking spaces numbered at High School and West Middle School. 

Installed new stage floor at West Middle School. 

New carpeting installed in media center and music room at West Middle School. 

Installed new counters in Media Center at West Middle School. 

Installed new carpeting in second floor hallways at Shawsheen School. 

Installed play field fence at Shawsheen School. 

New house trailer installed at West Fire Station for temporary quarters for Public Safety 

Center renovations. 

Implemented a variety of ADA Projects including automatic door openers, signage, door 

hardware, etc. 

MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISION ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Installed new intercom system in Bancroft School. 

Installed new master clock system in Bancroft School. 

Installed backflow preventor at Bancroft School. 

Installed master clock system in Doherty Middle School. 

Upgraded all classroom and hallway lighting at Doherty Middle School for energy 

savings and better light levels. Received over $18,000 from Mass Electric energy 

program. 

Exterior lighting upgrades and automation of exterior lighting controls at High School. 

AHERA (asbestos) Inspections completed in all schools, upgraded record keeping. 

Replace all classroom unit ventilators (heating & ventilating) at Sanborn School. 

Installed paddle fans in Sanborn School cafeteria. 

Replaced boiler at Sanborn School. 

Installed new intercom system in Shawsheen School. 

Repaired Shawsheen School Chimney. 

Installed new emergency generator at Ballardvale Fire Station. 

Upgraded/replaced electrical distribution system and emergency power system in 

Town Yard Highway/Vehicle Maintenance building. 

Installed fire alarm system at Red Spring Road building. 

Purchased and outfitted portable trailer mounted 30 kw emergency generator. 

Installed emergency vehicle pre-emption system (Opticom) at three intersections. 

Provided utilities (power, water, sewer) for West Fire Station trailer. 

Completed converting West Elementary School HVAC system to Direct Digital 

Controls (DDC). 

Extended and repaired West Elementary School chimney. 

Replaced water coolers at West Elementary School. 

Installed paddle fans in A-Pod and B-Pod, West Elementary School. 

Upgraded all plumbing & fixtures at West Elementary School 1st grade bathrooms. 



40 



• Installed Master clock and bell system in West Middle School. 
Installed new intercom system in West Middle School. 

• Installed new unit ventilators in nurse's office, teachers room, and classroom at West 
Middle School. 

PARKS AND GROUNDS, CEMETERY & FORESTRY DIVISIONS 

The three Parks and Grounds Divisions (Parks and Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one superintendent and 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage connections, snow removal, and moving 
heavy items such as the whiskey barrels used as planters in the downtown area and building and 
repairing park benches and tables. 

During Calendar Year 2000 these divisions completed 116 work orders (Town 82, Schools 34) 
totaling $695,382.18 (labor and materials). 

PARKS DIVISION 

This division maintains 2.75 million square feet of ballfields and 1.4 million square feet of 
lawn areas. Ballfields and lawns are located on all School grounds and other Town property such 
as Recreation Park, Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower Shawsheen, the Bowling Green, 
parks, playgrounds and designated islands, triangles and other parcels throughout the Town. 
Ballfields are prepared (groomed and lined) for all secondary school athletic events. Turf 
maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watering, over-seeding, liming fertilizing and weed 
and insects control. Pesticide operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel using 
approved pesticides and application methods. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs 
and shrub beds on Town property and is responsible for snow removal at all Town buildings. 

PARKS & GROUNDS ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

• Installation of underground irrigation system at The Park adjacent to the Town Offices. 

• Major restoration work to athletic fields at South School. 

• Major restoration work to Upper Shawsheen fields. 

• Improved maintenance to all playing fields. 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town of Andover. 
The cemetery contains approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 
2000, there were 101 burials and 94 grave sites sold. Cemetery operations and maintenance 
includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small trees, leaf pickup, 
town wide snow removal, and other tasks including grounds maintenance in Recreation Park and 
special projects at other Town facilities. 



41 



CEMETERY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Opened new section for burials at Spring Grove Cemetery. 

Phase II of underground water pipe replacements completed. 

Extensive paving work completed at Spring Grove Cemetery. 

New main entrance signage installed. 

Rules & Regulations for Spring Grove Cemetery updated and approved by the Cemetery 

Trustees. 

FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town-owned trees. The 
majority of their time is spent pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of 
undesirable vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved 
visibility. The Forestry Division also mows roadsides throughout the Town and maintains the 
Bald Hill compost site. 

FORESTRY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Awarded "Tree City USA" from the National Arbor Day Foundation and the Massachusetts 

Department of Environmental Management. 

Distributed 2000 Concoler Fir tree seedlings to Andover students on Arbor Day. 

Assisted the Department of Public Works by planting new trees as part of a new Sidewalk 

Project. 

Planted 60 new street shade trees throughout the Town. 

Implemented a new garden in The Park adjacent to the Town Offices on Bartlet Street in 

honor of Andover, England. 

Completed demolition work for the old Dragons Liar playground at the Bancroft School. 

Received a "Mass Relief Tree Grant for $3,240. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a working foreman and the Director of 
Plant and Facilities. This division provides maintenance to all Town vehicles and major pieces 
of equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW trucks and heavy equipment, Plant 
and Facilities trucks and heavy equipment, Town-wide emergency generators and other support 
vehicles and coordinates the purchasing for new vehicles. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

• Provided preventive maintenance and general repairs to 133 Town vehicles and major pieces 
of equipment, 15 School and Town buildings emergency generators and 28 smaller pieces of 
equipment. 

• 1,21 1 work orders completed. 



42 



5,264 


5,493 


5,570 


43% 


46% 


43% 


39% 


33% 


36% 


18% 


21% 


21% 



MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS DIVISION 

This division of the Plant and Facilities Department is responsible for scheduling and 
renting school facilities evenings, weekends and holidays, as well as scheduling and renting 
School and Town athletic fields, Recreation Park and the Town House function facility on Main 
Street. 

Schools 

The overall number of school rentals and uses during 2000 was 5,570 which is a 2.2% 
increase over 1999. Overall, gymnasium spaces continue to comprise the majority of the rental 
and scheduling contracts. Uses of the cafeterias and auditoriums comprise the second and third 
greatest number of contracts and other spaces such as classrooms being the smallest rental 
category at the schools. The figures below do not include rentals or uses of the Andover High 
School athletic fields, gymnasium, field house or Collins Center, which are all scheduled through 
the School Administration Office. 

1998 1999 2000 

Total Number of Scheduled Rentals/Uses: 

Dept. of Community Services /Youth Services 
Private Rentals: Youth Leagues/Scouting Groups 
School & PTO Sponsored Events 

Fields 

School and Town playing fields continue to be rented to capacity due to the growing 
number of participants in local youth and sports leagues as well as the growth of additional 
Andover High School and Youth Services boys' and girls' Lacrosse teams. The Municipal 
Building Division and Parks and Grounds Division continues to work with local sports leagues 
and have coordinated schedules that have allowed the "resting" of at least one field per year. 
This program is needed to improve field conditions which have been deteriorating due to 
overuse. The future goal is to rest several of the more heavily used fields if additional fields 
become available or if league schedules are reduced. 

The number of scheduled field rentals and uses was up 7.5 % over last year. Youth 
athletic leagues such as the Andover Soccer Association and Little League continue to schedule 
the majority of field spaces with scheduling for Town-sponsored recreation programs, Andover 
Junior Football, Andover Girls Softball League and the Andover adult sports leagues making up 
the remainder of the scheduled uses. Due to the great demand for practice and game space by 
Andover leagues, less than 1 % of the total number of rentals was to private groups or business 
organizations. 

The expansion of the Lacrosse teams and DCS and AYS programs continue to draw more 
participants each year. These programs, as well as the growth of other youth leagues, have added 
to the existing scheduling constraints on Town and School fields which are booked to maximum 



43 



3,016 


2,706 


2,906 


81% 


81% 


75% 


15% 


13% 


21% 


4% 


6% 


4% 



capacity Monday through Saturday each week during each sport season. 

1998 1999 2000 



Total Number of Scheduled Rentals/Uses: 
Youth Leagues 

Division of Community Services, 
Division of Youth Services & AHS Athletics 
Adult Leagues/Private Rentals 

Recreation Park 



Recreation Park is available for private rentals on weekends from April to October. 
During weekdays in the Spring, Summer and early Fall, the Park's softball field and tennis courts 
are scheduled for the Division of Community Services' tennis classes, recreational programs, as 
well as a co-ed softball league. The total number of scheduled uses was up 27 % as compared to 
last year. The largest category of growth was the increase in the number of scheduled uses for 
the Soccer and Youth Baseball Programs. The second largest area of growth was the doubling of 
private rentals. The vast majority of these rentals were to local residents and non-profit 
organizations. 



1998 



1999 



2000 



Total Number of Scheduled Rentals/Uses: 
Division of Community Services 
Youth Leagues 
Private Rentals 



166 


235 


298 


119 


180 


175 


9 


12 


58 


38 


33 


65 



Old Town Hall 

The function hall at the Andover Town House has been available to municipal/school 
groups, residents and non-residents for special events since February 1990. The total number of 
uses/rentals in 2000 was nearly double the uses in 1 999. The largest increase was the number of 
uses by municipal and school organizations. 

1998 1999 2000 



Municipal/School Events 

Residents 

Non-Residents 



24 


39 


108 


44 


50 


48 


2 


6 


14 



44 



PLANT AND FACILITIES STATISTICS 



r 

3,250 


FIELD RENTALS * 




i 








3,000 
2,750 








\ ^>-* 


>r" 






2,500 












2,250 






1 






2,000 








1998 1999 


2000 


^ 






-> 



6,000 
5,750 
5,500 
5,250 
5,000 
4,750 
4,500 



SCHOOL BUILDING 
USE PERMITS 




1998 



1999 



2000 



f 




^ 


3,500 
3,000 


WORK ORDERS 




™ 










2,500 


K_- 












2,000 
1,500 
1,000 












♦"". — -' " 


---A 




kr 






500 





























- H 


1998 1999 
> tvnahm ■ t\ inni -a 


2000 
\/cuTri f 




VCnlL.LL 





r 




GRAVE SITES 




250 














200 






1 






1 


150 












i 

! 


100 






! 






— -♦ ! 


50 






i 






i 









1 










1998 


1999 


2000 


I 









* Decrease due to reduction in fields available, not a reduction in demand. 



45 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of life 
by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (liquid and solid) and 
provide safe travel on our road network. 

ENGINEERING 

The Engineering Division prepared construction plans, cost estimates, specifications and 
bids, performed field layouts, inspections and construction supervision on projects such as: new 
sewer construction on Beacon Street south of the West Elementary School and at the West Andover 
Fire Station; the reconstruction of sidewalks on Maple Avenue, Summer Street from Elm Street to 
Whittier Street and Andover Street from Woburn Street to Highvale Lane; the installation and repair 
of storm drains on Dascomb Road, Blanchard Street and six other various locations: and the 
installation of School Zone Warning Signals on Bartlet Street. The Engineering staff also assisted 
and coordinated with consultants and contractors and performed various inspections during 
reconstruction of the River Street Bridge and Repairs to the Hussey's Pond Dam. The division also 
performed field surveys and designs to prepare for upcoming construction projects such as: Sidewalk 
Reconstruction on River Street from Andover St. to house #57; North Main Street from Lowell St. to 
Windsor St.; Poor Street from Lowell St. to Windsor St.; and High Plain Road from Beacon St. to 
West Elementary School; and the construction of a new Salt Storage Shed at the Town Yard. 

Preliminary work was performed with the Town's consultant for the design of the future 
sewer extensions for the South Main Street /Ballardvale Road Areas, Rogers Brook Area and the 
Forest Hills Drive /Cross Street Area. Staff members also assisted and coordinated with consultants 
on the design of other projects such as the Main Street Corridor Improvements. Work was also 
performed to field locate various utility features to be included in the development of the Town's 
GIS System. 

Planning and estimating for the resurfacing of forty Town streets was prepared this year, 
while assistance was given to the Highway Division during the actual work performed on twenty- 
three of these streets. 

Preliminary and Definitive Subdivision Plans and Site Plans were reviewed for the Planning 
Board; checked for design conformance, traffic safety, layout and adequacy of proposed roads and 
utilities. All roads and utilities in new subdivisions and sites such as Coderre Way, Cullen Circle, 
Stirling Street Ext., Whittemore Terrace, High Meadow Road, Minuteman Park and numerous other 
sites were inspected and tested to insure compliance with Town construction standards. Performance 
bond amounts were also calculated as requested by the Planning Board. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities, 
including many such excavations by Bay State Gas Company, Bell Atlantic, Mass Electric and 
Media One contractors, were issued through this division and the necessary utility markouts and 
inspections were carried out. 

The Engineering Division updated the Town Assessor's maps and printed the necessary 

46 



copies for other Town Departments. The staff also provided and maintained records of various 
utilities, street excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and road 
maintenance. 

1998 1999 2000 



Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.) 

Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 

Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 

Water Main Design & Construction (ft.) 

Guardrail Replaced/installed (ft.) 

Streets Resurfaced (miles) 

Street Opening Permits Issued & Inspected 

Sewer Connections reviewed for Board of Health 

Assessors Maps updated 

Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (# plans / # lots) 

Performance Bonds figured for Planning Board 

Subdivision Construction Inspections/Tests: 

Water mains (ft.) 

Sewer mains (ft.) 

Drain lines (ft.) 

Sidewalks (ft.) 

Roads Paved: Binder coarse (ft.) 
Top coarse (ft.) 
Streets Reviewed for Town Acceptance 



3,870 


1,180 


2,378 


2,490 


1,900 


1,660 


3,970 


8,500 


6,140 


1,950 


775 





19,200 








16.3 


10.7 


5.4 


198 


183 


175 


47 


50 


48 


59 


49 


30 


26/146 


17/51 


16/62 


8 


14 


9 


17,121 


18,314 


13,200 


6,000 


4,314 


2,619 


10,547 


6,315 


2,890 


4,370 


5,103 


3,854 


7,112 


2,069 


5,280 


6,587 


5,974 


4,280 


14 


9 


12 



HIGHWAY 

The Highway Division is responsible for road maintenance, including rebuilding and 
resurfacing, of approximately 200 miles of existing roads. During the spring and summer months, 
two sweepers are continuously kept busy cleaning winter sand of all streets. Both sweepers start 
work at 5 A.M. to take advantage of low traffic and parking conditions. The division also assists the 
Engineering Division in inspecting new roads prior to acceptance as public ways. The division is 
responsible for the cleaning and maintenance of all storm water systems including catch basin and 
pipe cleaning as well as maintenance of water courses impaired by beaver dams. The Highway 
Division is the lead agency responsible for snow removal and flood control measures; other Town 
divisions assist in these operations. 



1998 



1999 



2000 



Number of streets resurfaced 

Total number of miles of road resurfaced 

Total number of feet of curbs constructed 

Catch basins cleaned 

Storm drains cleaned 

Catch basins repaired 

Storm drains repaired 



52 


56 


21 


16.3 


10.7 


5.4 


6,075 


12,115 


22,104 


957 


936 


586 


17 


9 





31 


30 


41 


3 


1 


4 



47 



SOLID WASTE 

Andover, being a member of the North East Solid Waste Committee (NES WC), has its refuse 
transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant in North Andover, where the refuse 
is incinerated to generate electricity. The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside 
recycling program for newspapers/magazines, junk mail, paperboard metal containers, glass, and the 
voluntary drop-off program collecting #1, #2 plastics and aluminum materials. The Town also 
maintains a leaf and grass clippings compost site on High Plain Road, near Bald Hill, with the 
compost material being available to Town residents. The Town has expanded the curbside recycling 
program for FY/01 to include the aluminum materials, #1 & #2 plastics and corrugated containers 
(cardboard). 



1998 



1999 



2000 



Tons of residential refuse collected 

Tons of mixed residential paper 

Tons of glass recycled 

Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 

Tons of #1 & 2 plastics 

Tons of aluminum materials 

Tons of leaves & grass clippings composted 



11,753 
2,213 



11,888 

2,137 



12,764 
2,668 



431 


423 


455 


7 


7 


8 


39 


47 


52 


5 


4 


12 


,200 


2,200 


2,200 



WATER 

During the four compliance periods in 2000, synthetic organic compounds, volatile organic 
compounds, trihalomethanes, secondary contaminant, inorganic compounds, and haloacetic acids 
were analyzed. Compliance with each maximum contaminant level was verified at each sample site. 

Monitoring of the distribution system as required by the Total Coliform Rule yielded no 
violations. Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and enteric viruses were monitored in untreated water and 
benchmarking CT reports suggest 99.9 per cent removal of these organisms. 

Consumer Confidence Reports were delivered to water consumers. The report contained the 
required information and an overview of the entire system. 

The Treatment Plant processed 2,057. 114 million gallons (average 5.636 MGD) to produce 
1 ,829.992 million gallons of finish water delivered to the distribution system. Forty- four percent of 
the water was for residential use. Additionally, 1 , 1 12.579 million gallons of water was diverted from 
the Merrimack River to Haggett's Pond through our Fish Brook Station. 



1998 



Hydrants Repaired 

Hydrants Replaced 

Hydrants Inspected & Serviced 

Hydrants Flushed 

Water Main Breaks Repaired 



1999 



2000 



36 


36 


45 





4 


1 
211 


1 


2 


106 


19 


16 


9 



48 



1998 



1999 



2000 



House Service Leaks Repaired 

House Services Renewed 

Water Main Taps 

New Water Meters Installed 

Old Water Meters Replaced 

Water Meters Repaired 

Water Shut Offs/Turn On 

Gate Boxes Adjusted 

Gallons of water treated (in millions) 

Average daily gallons pumped (in million gal.) 

Maximum day (in million gallons) 

SEWER 



18 


6 


14 


3 


13 


13 


4 


11 


9 


134 


116 


116 


121 


132 


197 


5 


7 


1 


188 


178 


177 


46 


28 


36 



2,075 

5.004 

13.949 



2,452 
6.51 
13.430 



2,102 

5.76 

11.053 



The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the wastewater 
pumping stations on Dale Street in Ballardvale, Bridle Path, Osgood St., Shawsheen Village, and the 
entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system includes 70.5 miles of sanitary sewers and 
5,293 connections. The raw sewage discharge from the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is 
transported by means of a force main through the City of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence Sanitary 
District's Regional Treatment Plant for treatment. 



Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 
Sewer Main Rodded - Maintenance 
Sewer Mains Repaired 
Sewer Services Cleared 



1998 



1999 



2000 



47 


28 


46 


8 


3 


3 


2 


1 


3 


13 


3 


7 



GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 

The Greater Lawrence Sanitary District wastewater treatment facility continued to provide 
service to residential, commercial and industrial users in 2000. Since its began operation in April 
1 977, the facility has treated 269 billion gallons of wastewater that was previously discharged, 
untreated, into the Merrimack River. 

The plant is currently staffed by forty-eight people. The operation is continuous 24 hours per 
day and 365 days per year. The District Commission meets monthly to address policy matters. 



Andover's daily average flow to the 
Sanitary District (in millions of gallons) 



1998 



4.322 



1999 



3.500 



2000 



3.959 



49 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 




1998 



1999 



2000 



STREET RESURFACING 




1998 



1999 



2000 



SOLID WASTE & 
RECYCLING COLLECTION 



12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

Ifl 

O 6,000 
H 

4,000 

2,000 





m. i 




y. 

it 



E3 Refuse ■ Newspapers/ Magazines Q Glass 



2,500 



WATER TREATED 




1998 



1999 



2000 



50 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

The mission of the Memorial Hall Library is to make available a broad range of library 
materials, to provide up-to-date and accurate information, to offer services and programs 
desired by the community of Andover, to act as the most convenient point of access for the 
needed materials and information, to actively seek to make community members and 
organizations aware of library resources and services, and to utilize technology and the Internet 
to the fullest possible extent in carrying out this mission. 

The Library is at the heart of the Andover community in many ways and sometimes this 
is borne out in the cold-hearted statistics. For example, use of the Library's meeting room 
increased 30% in Year 2000 over 1999. A major reason for this increase was that the census 
takers for the Town used the Library's meeting room as a center for their training and 
management activities. Another statistic testifying to the closeness of the Library to the hearts of 
Andoverites is the 386,000 visits they made to the Library in 2000. For whatever reasons, 
whether to check out books, look up information on the Web, or to attend a program, so many 
visits to the Library means that Memorial Hall is at the center of our community. 

Some pundits associate technology with a turn away from social institutions and an 
increasing isolation of Americans. However, our statistics show that more people than ever are 
coming through the Library doors in order to use the Library's PC's to communicate and keep in 
touch with each other. More than 30,000 uses were made of the Libraries' computers in 2000. 
In addition, another 100,000 visits were made to the Library's web pages to find out information 
about the world, their friends, and themselves. One way the Library is helping people stay in 
touch with their community is through the Community Calendar. This electronic date book is 
now listing the events of 33 local organizations from Phillips Academy to the "Mother 
Connection." You too can keep in touch by clicking on http://www.mhl.org/bin/webevent.pl 

At the end of 2000, the Library changed its catalog from what was a 15-year old 
automated system, to a new, web-based catalog that is accessible from home as well as anywhere 
else that has an Internet connection. Library users are now able to call up their individual 
circulation records, make reserves, renew items, and check on the status of their cards. Library 
users have been enthusiastic about this change and the Library staff expects to see increased use 
of the reserve system, and more books circulating, as a result of these improvements. 

Andover citizens love their Library. Many show it through their participation in the 
Friends book sales, others through their volunteer jobs, and many others through their donations 
to the Library's causes. The Library Trustees show it through the many meetings they attend and 
the support they provide for the Library director and staff. The Library staff show their love 
through the way they provide help and assistance for all the Library users. The end result of all 
this support and passion is this truly unique institution called Memorial Hall Library. 



51 



LIBRARY DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



BOOKS & PERIODICALS 




1998 
1 Adult 



1999 



2000 

E2 Children 



J 



NON-PRINT CIRCULATION 



150,000 



100,000 



50,000 





1998 1999 2000 

■ Adult Children 



J 



f 




\ 


70,000 


REFERENCE QUESTIONS 




^ 




65,000 


/^^^ 




/ \^^ 


60,000 


/ ^^^* 




/ 


55,000 


/ 




/ 


50,000 


/ 




/ 


45,000 


/ 




/ 


40,000 


J 






35,000 








30,000 










1998 1999 2000 




L 




4 



r 


PC & INTERNET USE 


\ 


35,000 








30,000 






/ 


25,000 


/ 




y 


20,000 


jf 




s* 


15,000 


/S 




/ 


10,000 


fs 






5,000 






1998 1999 2000 


^ 




_> 



52 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of life 
in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property, but, with the changing times of 
increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the community. To 
continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, working with their 
suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that we all enjoy in Andover. 

The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public safety 
and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods are 
maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. We emphasize integrity, honesty, 
impartiality and professionalism from our members in order to create an environment that values 
differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. We encourage citizen input and 
interaction that will assist us in developing sound partnerships between the community and the 
police. Working together we can protect our future and enhance the quality of life for everyone 
within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The total number of incidents for 2000 were down slightly from 1999. Adult arrests were 
also down slightly but the number of Juvenile arrests increased slightly, 5% over 1 999. There was a 
significant increase in the number of arrests for drug related offenses during 2000. Drug related 
arrests for adults were up 56% and Juvenile drug arrests were up 171% over 1999. 

The Town experienced a 2 1 % decrease in thefts and a 23% decrease in stolen motor vehicles. 
Stolen motor vehicles were at a five-year low for 2000. Vandalism for 2000 decreased 2% from the 
previous year, also reaching a five year low. 

The Police Department stopped 11,205 motor vehicles and issued 7,041 motor vehicle 
citations during 2000. This enforcement action greatly contributed to an 8%reduction in motor 
vehicle accidents. This is also represents a five-year low for motor vehicle accidents in the Town. 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other departments, agencies and the 
community throughout the year. The Police Department established two Community Policing Sub 
Stations in Town during 2000. These Sub-Stations, located in Brookside Estates and on Grandview 
Terrance allow the Police Department to form a partnership with the residents of Brookside Estates 
and the Andover Housing Authority. The Substance Abuse Unit and the Traffic Unit continued to 
address the problems of the community, in their respective area, contributing greatly to the very 
positive statistics for 2000. 

The Department also participated in numerous events including the Christmas and Memorial 
Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Bazaar Days, Know Your Town, the 
Feaster Five Road Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held during the 
year. 



53 



RECORDS DIVISION 

The Records Division provides support services to the entire Police Department. This 
support service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the department as well as to the 
entire community. 

The Police Department received more than $262,000.00 in new grant money during 2000. 
These grants allowed the Department to serve the community by providing funding for personnel 
and other resources. A grant $15,000 for the DARE program allows the Department to assign a 
specially trained officer to the schools to teach the dangers of drugs and alcohol. More than $200,00 
in grant money provides salaries for officers and allowed us to provide the many services the Town 
has come to expect from the Police Department. A $24,000 grant will allow us to hire a civil 
specialist to assist the Department with it's many computer network systems. Equipment grants 
have allowed us to provide car safety seats and bicycle helmets to those who would otherwise not be 
able to afford such safety items. Equipment for a fingerprint workstation and additional defibrillators 
have been purchased with the help of grant money received during 2000. 

The Court Section processed a total of 738 arrests, 435 summonses, and 864 hearings. This 
included tracking all police department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers 
appearances in court. In addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other Town 
Departments (Health Dept, Building Dept, etc.). 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow up investigations conducted by the 
agency. The Detective Division also oversees the Substance Abuse Unit. This Unit was created in 
response to the community's request for the Police Department to take a more active role combating 
drugs and alcohol in the Town. In addition there are 2 officers trained in technical services such as 
fingerprint identification techniques and crime scene processing and 4 officers trained in rape 
investigation. The Division also has 1 investigator assigned as a Juvenile officer. He works closely 
with the schools and courts in processing Juvenile cases. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying the perpetrators of 
numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated 7 1 burglaries, 1 rape and 337 larcenies 
during 2000. 

The Division also investigates incidents on the Internet. During the past year investigators 
have been trained in dealing with this new problem. The Department recognizes this new aspect of 
Internet crime as a major problem to our community and cautions all parents and residents of the 
Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 



54 



ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 1131 calls for service in 2000. This is a 1 7% increase 
over 1999. He responded to 278 dog complaints and impounded 86 dogs and 19 cats. He also 
removed 1 69 deceased animals. In addition to these removed animals, there were 1 5 deer struck and 
killed by motor vehicles in Town. 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Emergency Management Division is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA) and includes 
a network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. 

The Chief of Police is also the Town's Liaison with the regional Local Emergency Planning 
Committee (LEPC) and is responsible for coordinating the Town's response any hazardous materials 
incident. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They are a 
very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a resource. 



55 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 






100 



75 



50 



25 



BREAKING & ENTERING 




1998 



1999 



2000 



56 



POLICE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



100 
90 
80 
70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 




1998 1999 

-♦ — Motor Vehicles 



2000 

- - Bicycles 



50 
40 
30 
20 
10 




DOMESTIC ABUSE 




1998 



1999 



2000 



PARKING VIOLATIONS 




1998 



1999 



2000 



f 




VANDALISM 






245 


















235 
















: 


225 








• 










215 








j 










205 


















195 








I 










185 


















175 










1998 


1999 


2000 





57 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Fire Department is to proudly protect lives and property by 
providing prompt, skillful, cost-effective fire protection and life safety services to the residents of 
Andover. 

To achieve its mission, the Department strives to prevent loss to property from fire or fire 
related activities through inspections, training, and maintaining its fire alarm system; loss of life 
through prompt professional delivery of emergency medical services using both fire and ambulance 
vehicles. The Department provides programs to increase fire safety awareness among area citizens 
annually in all schools and whenever requested by private organizations, industries and businesses. 



1998 



1999 



2000 



TOTAL INCIDENTS: 



5703 



7866 



9130 



Fires 

Rescues 

Miscellaneous Alarms 

Accidental Alarms 

Mutual Aid (Fire Calls) 

False Alarms 

Violations 

Ambulance Emergency Calls 

Ambulance Mutual Aid Calls 

Fire Prevention Activities 

Service Calls 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Training 

Co-Activation 



245 


445 


420 


8 


16 


21 


278 


404 


528 


243 


175 


180 


19 


35 


20 


195 


191 


50 


1 








2022 


2427 


2770 


174 


155 


61 


1864 


2040 


2343 


428 


1501 


2265 


181 


249 


283 


45 


180 


144 




48 


45 



PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED: 



2048 



2097 



1925 



Smoke Detectors 
Report Copies 
Blasting Permits 
Cutting/Welding Permits 
Dumpster Permits 
Fireworks Display Permits 
Gunpowder Storage Permits 
Liquid Gas Storage Permits 
Flammable Liquid Storage Permits 
Miscellaneous Permits 
Open Air Burning Permit 
Oil Burner Install Permits 
Re-inspection Fees 
Commercial Fire Alarm Systems 



764 


716 


725 


61 


77 


72 


16 


17 


7 


15 


13 


15 


69 


72 


58 


1 


1 


1 


1 








52 


69 


57 


4 


1 


6 


11 


5 


2 


679 


613 


571 


166 


159 


112 











28 


47 


28 



58 



1998 



1999 



2000 



PERMITS/LICENSES ISSUED (CONT.): 



Special Suppression System Permits 
Sprinkler Install Permits 
Tentage Permits 

Underground Tank Re-certification 
Underground Tank Removals 
Underground Tank Install permits 
Master Fire Alarm Boxes 



FEES COLLECTED: 



Ambulance Fees: 
Permits/Licenses : 
Fire Alarm Box Fees 



5 


12 


6 


58 


76 


62 


1 








16 


10 





99 


74 


57 


2 


2 


9 


138 


133 


137 


$418,615 


$502,826 


$587,777 


$368,660 


$447,726 


$533,572 


$32,105 


$ 34,550 


$ 33,655 


$ 17,850 


$ 20,550 


$ 20,550 



PERSONNEL: 



68.7 



69.8 



72.8 



FACILITIES: 



APPARATUS/EQUIPMENT: 



Central Station 

32 North Main Street 



3 Ambulances, 1 Ladder Truck, 

2 Pumpers, 2 Boats, 3 Sedans, 

1 Command Vehicle and 1 Brush Truck 



West Station 

Greenwood & Chandler Roads 



1 Pumper, 1 Fire Alarm Truck, 

2 Boats, 1 Brush Truck, 

1 Ladder Tower and 1 Lighting Unit 



Ballardvale Station 
Clark & Andover Streets 



1 Pumper and 2 Boats 



59 



FIRE DEPARTMENT STATISTICS 



600 



FIRE CALLS 




1998 1999 2000 

■ Andover ED Mutual Aid 



AMBULANCE CALLS 




1998 1999 



2000 



I Andover E3 Mutual Aid 



PERMITS & LICENSES ISSUED 



2,000 



1,500 



1,000 



500 



I 


■ 


■ 



1998 



1999 



2000 



□ Dumpster ■ Open Air Burning 

□ Master Fire Alarm Boxes □ Smoke Detectors 



J 



MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS 




1998 



1999 



2000 



* Some ambulance calls which did not result in transport of a patient to a hospital were ommitted from the 
ambulance call statistics prior to March 1999. 



60 



DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

The Division of Community Services provides the residents of Andover a myriad of social, 
educational, cultural and recreational opportunities embracing diversity and accessibility for all. 
Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate ideas into valued 
programs for its citizens now and in the future. 



The Division of Community Services (DCS) offers year round recreational, enrichment and 
cultural programs for residents of all ages. Through the mutual mission of educating its residents, the 
Andover School Department and Community Services has an agreement to open the public schools 
for community use through the DCS. After school programs are held sytstem-wide, while the 
majority of the evening adult education programs are housed at Andover High School. The 
programs are held at the public schools, Recreation Park, Pomps Pond, The Park, Senior Center, 
Greater Lawrence Technical High School and other in-town facilities. DCS continues to transfuse 
residents' ideas into valued programs. A vigorous effort by the DCS staff continually improves 
services to the Town's residents. Healthy enrollment is attributed to a repertoire of community-based 
instructors, streamlined registration including FAX, VISA/MasterCard, overnight mailbox and 
increased identification with the DCS booklet publication. The new look to the program booklet 
continues with layout improvements making the document user friendly. Enrollments have increased 
within the youth programming categories attributed to the offerings of a wide variety of interests and 
the scheduling of family friendly time slots. 

Family-oriented activities have been encouraged with the Father/Daughter and Family Town 
Hall dances, seasonal nature walks, a Whitewater rafting trip and the Santa Parade Concert. Many 
popular classes also encourage family participation such as archery, ballroom dancing, crafts and 
cooking classes. Recreation Park programming included an expanded tennis program, an all new 
lifeguarding course at Pomps Pond, a Pirate's Adventure Program and Kids Sport-O-Rama. 

Instructors come from all segments of the community. Professionals, specialists, hobby 
enthusiasts, homemakers, student interns and retired individuals comprise the teaching and 
leadership staff. This varied instructor base allows DCS the ability to offer diverse programs. The 
majority of instructional staff reside within the Town, however, in several instances DCS is able to 
bring in quality programs from outside the region (science, enrichment and sports). The Andona 
Society babysitting class, sports clinics, junior golf, basketball, tennis and rope skipping continue to 
be the most popular youth programs. Top adult class choices are tennis, ballroom dancing, yoga, 
golf, drawing, Italian conversation and computer classes. Over 200 classes are offered each tri- 
semester with recent enrollments totaling 7,200 individuals. This year DCS offered 53 new programs 
for children and adults. In addition to swim lessons and open swimming, sailing lessons were offered 
to the public at Pomps Pond. The sail fleet encompasses five sailboats. Over the Summer months, 
DCS serves well over 25,000 people. 

Several Town departments participate in offering Town Topics to residents at no cost or low 
cost. These programs give residents the opportunity to meet up close with the Town's employees on 
a personal level. Participants learn about the different facets of Town government and the resources 
available to them. Departments that participated in 2000 included the Fire Department, Memorial 



61 



Hall Library, the Town Clerk and Inspector of Buildings. 

Networking with the community, DCS set up new programs housed at Marland Place, Body 
Sense, Dance Infusion and a stable in New Hampshire for horsemanship lesion. Agencies 
developing programs in conjunction with DCS included the Memorial Hall Library, Alternative 
Leisure, Kaplan, The French and Spanish Saturday School, Kaleidoscope and the Andover Youth 
Sports Association. New programs were offered with the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention 
of Cruelty to Children and the National Alliance for the Mentally 111, co-sponsored with the 
Department of Mental Health. A gender initiative program in conjunction with the League of 
Women Voters brought a group to the State House in celebration of Women in History Month. DCS 
continues to use local resources to compliment its full-time staff. Eight Tax Voucher volunteers 
work with staff assisting with registration, general office duties and after school and evening 
programming. In addition, numerous students perform community service hours for school or 
religious education requirements or the Alternative Sentencing Program. 

Eagle Scout projects are always welcome at DCS. Two projects were completed in 2000: 
work at the Iceland Road Playground included a new bench, sandbox and rustic steps and at Rec 
Park/Pomps Pond message boards for the Pond and tennis courts were installed along with benches 
for the concession stand. 

The Revolving Account continues to assist DCS in its ability to sponsor a variety of activities 
and trips. School vacation programs, Children's Studio for the Arts and Summer Theatre Ensemble, 
violin lessons, John Smith Soccer, Big Apple Circus, museum tours and a Boston Harbor Island 
cruise are examples of programs that were funded through this account. 

Funds approved at the Annual Town Meeting provided two new playgrounds located at the 
lower Shawsheen Field and one to be located at Pomps Pond is scheduled to be installed in the 
Spring of 2001. Other Rec Park improvements include a tennis backboard and erosion control 
efforts at Pomps Pond. 

The following is a sample listing of popular programs and the number of participants: 

1998 1999 2000 

FALL PROGRAMS : 

Classes: Youth - ages 2-18 

Adults 



Town House Dance: 
Special Events/Trips: 
Santa Parade Concert: 

TOTAL PARTICIPATION IN FALL PROGRAMS: 2,016 2,530 2,220 



1,100 


990 


1,148 


636 


820 


649 


1,746 


1,810 


1,797 




250 


200 


150 


150 


123 




200 


100 



62 



1998 1999 2000 



WINTER PROGRAMS : 

Classes: Youth - ages 2-18 

Adults 



Ski Programs: Bradford - grades 3-8 

Nashoba - grades 6-8 



Youth Vacation Basketball: grades 1-5 
Basketball League: grades 1-3 

Adult Basketball League: 

Special Events/Trips: 

Father/Daughter Dance: grades 1-5 

TOTAL PARTICIPATION IN WINTER PROGRAMS: 



SUMMER PROGRAMS: 

Summer Classes: Youth - ages 2-18 
Adults 

School-age Programs: 

All Day Discovery grades K-5 

Summer Theatre grades 2-10 

John Smith Soccer grades K-5 

Andover Eagles grades 6-8 

Swimming/Sailing ages 3+ 

Club For All ages 5-9 

Drop-In Playground grades K-5 

Drop-In Field Trips grades K-5 

Sport-O-Rama ages 6-11 

PGA Golf grades 1 - 8 

Mini-Hawks pre-school 

Pre-school Programs: 

Shee-Hee ages 3-4 

Shaw-Knee ages 4-5 

Park Events ages 1-6 



1,200 


952 


1,181 


835 


928 


688 


2,055 


1,880 


1,869 


200 


240 


230 


85 


90 


50 


285 


350 


280 
359 




240 


320 


120 


120 


120 


225 


250 


125 




250 


250 


2,055 


2,970 


3,323 


1998 


1999 


2000 


1,118 


1,405 


947 


232 


250 


216 


1,350 


1,655 


1,163 


223 


300 


1,000 


125 


160 


142 


95 


100 


99 


13 


20 


15 


113 


125 


93 


93 


150 


150 


620 


650 


680 


1,200 


1,500 


1,500 

400 

120 

240 


2,482 


3,005 


4,439 


204 


130 


104 


217 


195 


150 


600 


400 


700 



1,021 725 954 



63 



1998 1999 2000 



SUMMER PROGRAMS: 

Pomps Pond: 
Stickers 

Daily Attendance 
Days at Maximum capacity 
Average number of people per day 



Concerts: 




The Park 


all ages 


Pomps Pond 


all ages 


Special Events: 




Fourth of July 


all ages 


Trips 


all ages 


Spinner's Clinic 


all ages 


Evening Bike Rides 


all ages 



210 


250 


200 


30+/cars 


55+/cars 


30+/cars 


20% 


90% 


N/A 


140 


280 


N/A 


2,400 


4,000 


11,200 


98 


2,200 


2,450 


1,800 


300 


200 


1,980 


2,500 


2,650 


3,000 


3,000 


4,000 


75 


100 


175 


25 


50 





120 


150 


150 


3,220 


3,300 


4,325 


600 


600 


600 



Co-Ed Adult Softball League: 

TOTAL PARTICIPATION IN SUMMER PROGRAMS: 13,053 15,785 25,331 

TOTAL PARTICIPATION IN DCS PROGRAMS: 17,634 21,285 30,874 



64 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 



Community Services General Fund Offset Receipts 
Community Services Revolving Account 



FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 FY2000 

$268,766 $348,812 $382,952 $400,000 $422,000 
$85,556 $61,166 $152,911 $210,750 $213,132 



$500,000 
$400,000 
$300,000 
$200,000 
$100,000 
$0 



REVENUES 



_^-+— ' — ~ 

_ — a ■ 

.-■--■"" 

■ ■--•-■ 



FY1996 FY1997 FY1998 FY1999 FY2000 



— DCS Offset Receipt Revenue 
-DCS Revolving Fund Expenditures 



65 



DTVTSTON OF E LDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and 
advocate for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of 
elders in the community, and to provide a focal point in the community where these programs 
and services can be easily accessed by elders and their families. 



The Division of Elder Services and the Senior Center extends sincere appreciation to all 
staff, volunteers, students, Town officials and other members of the community whose work is 
dedicated to creating and providing programs and services of the highest caliber to the 
community. 

INTFRCFNFRTTONAT PROGRAM WINS STATF-WTDF AWARD 

The Massachusetts Intergenerational Network (MIN) honored the Andover Senior Center 
and its partner the Andover School Department with the prestigious 2000 MIN Award for the 
Mentor-Net Program. This unique collaboration truly bridged the generation gap. Elders 
mentored students regarding post high school vocational and educational choices often helping 
with college applications. Students taught elders how to use the Internet and build a web page, 
lasting friendships formed and both generations learned valuable life lessons including how to 
"age well". Other partners in the project included the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical High School and the Senior Centers and school departments of the towns of North 
Andover and Methuen. 

SFRVTNC THF GROWTNC COMMUNITY OF ELDERS 

Another year of programs and services at the Senior Center demonstrated the growing 
needs of the nearly 5,200 members of the Andover Community of Elders. Within this report 
charts and graphs document the Division's activities and services. Significant increases continue 
in many service categories, especially services provided outside of the Senior Center. In other 
categories offerings were limited due to lack of space, parking and staff time. Waiting lists 
continue for many programs, classes and activities. The demand is clearly outstripping the ability 
of the Center to meet the needs of its customers. Yet, creative, award-winning programming 
continues to draw the interest of an increasing number of elders. Spirituality and Wellness 
programs topped the list of innovative programs and services. 

The social worker at the Senior Center provides a full range of casework, support groups, 
individual and family counseling, assessment and coordination of services. The effects of an 
increasingly frail at-home elder population and changes in Federal and State-funded services 
provided to elders by other agencies continues to place increasing demands on the Senior Center. 
The Senior Connections Program provides an individualized package of programs and services to 
enhance the quality of a senior's life and enable them to participate in a variety of programs both 
at the center and in the community. 

In the following statistical report, the various categories of Social Services show dramatic 

66 



increases in the number of clients served. Additional case coverage provided by contract with 
Family Services of Greater Lawrence has also increased. Social Services continues to be an area 
of concern. Outreach, planning and administration will be challenges for the next several years. 
Coordination with other agencies will continue to be a priority. 

HEALTH, WELLNESS, NUTRITION, the GENERATIONS, AND ADVOCACY 

Health & We llness 

The Center provided a variety of opportunities for elders to maintain, enhance and 
improve their health. Health programs designed specifically for women and men were offered 
and well attended. Well-known area health professionals and authors provided valuable 
information on various topics presented during the year. Strength training, massage therapy, Chi 
Gong, aerobics, Reiki, Tai Chi, and Yoga classes realized dramatic increases in the numbers of 
participants. Programs utilizing Mind-Body techniques, which many health professionals 
recommended as a means to compliment more traditional treatment methods for stress reduction 
and hypertension, were introduced this year and have been very successful. 

Nutrition 

Almost 25,000 meals were served by the Nutrition Program at the daily hot meal site at 
the Senior Center and by the Meals on Wheels Program. Since bringing the operation 
completely in-house, the Senior Center has been better able to address the nutritional needs of 
those participating in the program. Significant improvements in the type and quality of the meal 
served have resulted in a 20% increase in the number of meals served. 

Intergenerational/Eriiicational 

The Senior Center continues to work with children of all ages in the classroom and at the 
Center. Some programs are simply for fun, others are educational in nature and still others 
provide a very special way for children and elders to become friends and enrich each other's 
lives. Students from the Greater Lawrence Vocational School continue to do clinical placements 
with the Senior Connections program. The Community Service program at the Doherty Middle 
School provides students the opportunity to volunteer one class period each week at the center. 
Andover High School students participate on many levels with various computer programs, 
special events at the center and as "Snow-Busters" to provide the invaluable service of shoveling 
after snowstorms to prevent an elder from becoming snowbound. Moms and tots have developed 
playgroups at long-term care and assisted living facilities and the elders and youngsters have 
enjoyed new multi-generational friendships. Seniors participating in the Tax Work Off Program 
continue to provide support to many Town departments and are particularly visible in the schools 
where they provide 1-1 "coaching" to students in the library, classrooms, and computer labs. 

G OA LS & O BJE CTIVE S 

The staff and Council on Aging analyze statistical data annually, raise questions about 
effective service delivery, and plan for the future, continuously seeking to identify new needs and 



67 



improve the delivery of services. 

Continuing goals and objectives focus on improving social services, programs, 
intergenerational opportunities, education, volunteer opportunities and various administrative 
operations, including the improved transportation and initiation of the first phase of Senior 
Center Accreditation. 

THE COIINCY! ON ACINC AND THE CAMPAIGN FOR A NF.W SENIOR CENTER 

On November 1, 1999 the Board of Selectmen signed an agreement with Phillips 
Academy to lease Williams Hall on Phillips Street for $ 1 per year for thirty years for the location 
of the new Andover Senior Center. The architect was hired, site work and engineering and the 
all-important fundraising commenced. The Council on Aging, the Senior Center Building 
Committee and the Friends of the Andover Senior Center, Inc. continue to work towards the 
successful completion of this project. 



68 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



1998 



1999 



2000 



SOCIAL DAY PROGRAM/SR. CONNECTIONS 

Number of Unduplicated Elders 

INSTRUCTIONAL CLASSES 

Number of Unduplicated Elders 

LECTURES & SEMINARS 

Number of Unduplicated Attendees 
Number of Sessions 

NUTRITION 

Number of Meals-on- Wheels Served 

Number of Unduplicated Meals-on- Wheels Clients 

Number of On-Site Lunches Served 

Total Number of Meals Served 



37 



550 



36 



555 



38 



603 



1043 


978 


845 


32 


34 


33 


8,725 


11,770 


13,396 


105 


112 


128 


11,469 


9,117 


10,835 


20,299 


20,887 


24,231 



NUMBER OF SPECIAL EVENTS 



25 



43 



48 



MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 

Number of Volunteer Miles Driven 

Number of Rides 

Number of Riders 

Number of Volunteer Drivers 

FRIENDLY VISITOR PROGRAM 

Number of Clients 
Number of Visitors 

SENIOR CENTER VOLUNTEERS 

Number of Volunteers 
Number of Hours Served 
Value of Service @ $13.53/hr. 

TAX WORK-OFF PROGRAM 

Number of slots 

Number of hours 

Value to Town @ $13.53/hr. 



12,720 


12,817 


9,226 


1,100 


1,296 


1,204 


150 


184 


178 


26 


25 


30 


65 


104 


105 


90 


88 


90 


261 


320 


349 


16,318 


25,855 


34,807 


$220,782 


$349,818 


$470,938 


80 


110 


130 


8,000 


11,000 


13,000 


$108,240 


$148,830 


$175,890 



69 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 




MEALS SERVED 






1998 1999 2000 

El On-Site Lunches 

OH Unduplicated Meals-on-Wheels 

□ Meals-on-Wheels 



MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION 



1,350 
1,300 
1,250 

« 1,200 

1 

c 1,150 

1,100 
1,050 
1,000 




1998 



1999 



2000 



VALUE OF VOLUNTEER SERVICE 



$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 
$150,000 
$100,000 




1998 



1999 



2000 



$180,000 



$160,000 



$140,000 



$120,000 



$100,000 



TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
VALUE TO TOWN 




1998 



1999 



2000 



70 



ANDOVER YOUTH SERVICES 

The A YS aims to provide young people useful experiences to promote healthy growth and development. 
It is our goal to build a network of affordable, accessible, safe, and challenging youth programs that 
appeal and respond to the diverse interests of young adolescents and their families. 

Andover Youth Services (AYS) was established to address the need for an increase in 
recreational, educational, social, and support programs for the middle school and high school 
populations within the community. AYS supplies the youth of Andover with programs, services, 
and activities throughout the year. The AYS provides a direct link that connects youth to their 
community. Andover' s young people face many challenges and it is our mission to develop and 
maintain a program that has the ability to be flexible and encourages all youth to use their 
creativity and spontaneity in positive ways. 

The AYS summer program began with 30 kids in a mat room and has developed into a 
multifaceted program that involves over a thousand young people. Our ten-week program 
offered a wide variety of trips, adventures, camps, clinics, services, and extended trips for young 
people 11-16 years old. Every summer we offer a new line-up of activities with the focus on the 
importance of teamwork and introspective learning. Additionally, participants learn that their 
strengths, combined with others, enhance the quality of the experiences and expectations for 
their lives. This is accomplished by encouraging youth to participate in the structured activities 
offered through the summer program. The AYS repeated the success of previous summer 
programs in 2000. All trips were filled to capacity and feedback was resoundingly positive. 

Nearly 75 participants skated the ramps at the Andover Community Skate Park on a daily 
basis throughout the summer. A series of skate clinics gave dozens of young people the 
opportunity to learn skateboarding skills from the pros. Professional skateboard demonstration 
teams astonished hundreds of spectators with their graceful moves and jumps and remarked 
about the high quality of the park. Skateboard and In-line contests offered local young people a 
chance to showcase their perfected abilities. High school students directed and produced the 
play "Romeo and Juliet" to over a hundred of spectators in the park. The skate park provided 
services and recreational opportunities for the people of the community this summer. 

The AYS celebrated Women's History Month with a tribute to the women of Andover. 
The evening recognized women in the community who make a difference, big or small, in the 
lives of those around them. Nearly two hundred people listened to stories and testimonies of 
women who impact the community in countless positive ways. 

Hundreds of young people participated in summer and winter lacrosse as the AYS 
experienced continued growth of youth lacrosse programs. The boys high school lacrosse team 
made the state tournament in its second year and the first girls high school lacrosse team entered 
competitive play in the spring of 2000. The girls had very successful season and plan to enter a 
varsity team in 2001. Lacrosse has been a year-round effort offering clinics, introductory 
sessions, and pick up sessions. We continue to support this growing program by sustaining year- 
round fundraising efforts, recruiting coaches and volunteers. 



71 



In 2000, the AYS developed the White Mountain Snowboard into a series of three-day 
snowboarding camps at Loon Mountain, led by a team of sponsored instructors, and the 
multitalented AYS staff with the focus on improving riding skills with instruction on free-riding, 
half-pipe, and jumps - maintaining safety as the number one priority. We ran three camps in 
2000 over school vacations and weekends. 

The support piece of the AYS has continued to flourish with an increase in the 
community service program, our after school adventure-based program, drop in and flexible 
office hours, court-related services, volunteer and intern opportunities, hospital visits, referrals, 
college and employment, recommendations, fundraising for youth programs, crisis intervention, 
outreach, 24 hour emergency response, parent support and education, discussion groups, and 
specialized in-school groups. 

AYS events provided a community venue for young people to expose their creative 
talents. The 3 rd annual Keep It Wild Fashion Show, Shakespeare in the Park, and numerous 
concerts and dances attracted thousands of youth and presented unique entertainment 
opportunities for the Town of Andover. 

It is essential to connect with other people, groups, and systems already working with 
young people. The Andover Youth Services remained dedicated to establishing a community- 
wide network of supportive services for young people. AYS worked directly with the following 
organizations, creating and implementing policy, action items, fundraising, and advocacy for 
youth. Each of the following groups concentrates on developing programs, services, and 
outreach to those young people who are not connected positively to the community of Andover: 
Merrimack Valley Youth Forum, Andover Youth Council, Andover Youth Foundation, Inc., 
Friends of Andover Youth, Andover Community Advocates for Resources, Education, and 
Support (CARES), Gender Equity Committee, Community Health Advisory Team (CHAT), and 
AMC Youth Opportunities Program (YOP). 

AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people themselves and then 
take these ideas and empowers the youth to make them happen. By interacting alongside young 
people, whether it is handing out flyers or creating plans for a new youth center, the programs 
the Youth Services creates and implements are immediate reflections of what the youth want and 
need. By staying true to our philosophy, the AYS will continue to provide a diverse range of 
activities, events, groups, and programs for all young people of Andover in the new millennium. 



72 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all state and federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to Andover's over 3,500 veterans and their families. Since July 1, 2000 
the Office has responded to inquiries or requests from over 550 local veterans and has provided 
direct financial assistance for fuel, food, burials and medical needs to several dozen Andover 
families. The Town receives annual reimbursement from the Commonwealth for 75% of the funds 
provided to local veterans under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 115. 

In addition, the Office also plans and coordinates all patriotic observances on Veterans Day 
and Memorial Day and annually places over 5,500 flags on the graves of veterans buried in Andover. 
Band concerts and other civic activities are also handled by the Veterans Services Office. 

A major highlight in 2000 was that the Office placed over 300 local veterans on a special 
Veterans Administration Pharmacy Program that allows these veterans to receive 30-day supplies of 
prescription drugs by mail for $2.00, thus saving Andover veterans thousands of dollars. 

The Veterans Services Office Director is also the Town's Graves Registration and Burial 
Officer. Statistically, fifty-six (56) Andover veterans died during 2000: forty (40) were World War 
II veterans, thirteen (13) were Korean veterans and six (6) were Vietnam veterans. Several of these 
veterans fought in more than one war. 

According to the latest Federal Government statistics, 2,674 Andover veterans or their family 
members received $2,689,999 in Veterans Administration benefits for FY-2000. 

Formal ceremonies were held on Memorial Day, Flag Day, July 4 th , V-J Day, POW/MIA 
Day, Veterans Day, Pearl Harbor Day and the dedication of the George L. Street, III Memorial 
Bridge in November. 

The Office was also instrumental in arranging for the protection and rehabilitation of the 
Woodbridge-Jenkins Revolutionary War Cemetery that had been endangered by a construction 
project. 



73 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 

Tina B. Cirdwood, Chairman 
Eric J. Nadworny, Secretary 
Richard J. Collins 
Frank M. Eccles 
Gerald F. Custus 



AN DOVER PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

36 Bartlet Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 01810 
(978) 623-8501 
FAX (978) 623-8505 



CLAUDIA L. BACH. Ed.D. 

Superintendent of Schools 
cbach@massed . net 



ANNUAL REPORT 

2000 

Andover School Department 



During the 2000 school year the student population in the Andover Public Schools rose to 5,875. This 
was an increase of 90 students from the year before. In 1998 our student population grew by 78, and the year 
before that by 70 students. Over this last year the high school student population increased by 71 students and 
the middle schools by 36 students. In the 1990-91 school year our student population was at capacity in our 
elementary schools. Three years later our middle schools reached capacity. Until the new schools come on line 
in fall, 2002 the overcrowded conditions in the elementary and middle schools will continue to limit important 
programs and activities for the students of the Andover Public Schools. 

Currently, the students, along with more than 700 professional and support staff are housed in one 9- 
12 high school, two 6-8 middle schools, four K-5 elementary schools, and one K-2 controlled choice school. The 
FY'OO appropriation of $39,063,885 permitted the school department to move forward in several areas 
described below, but some initiatives and programs were slowed due to budget constraints. The combination of 
overcrowded schools and limited funds provide ample challenge for the professional staff to deliver a high 
quality educational experience for all students. 

To eliminate overcrowding the School Committee placed an article the 2000 warrant for the sum of 
$31,938,000 for "constructing, originally equipping and furnishing a new elementary and new middle school." 
The Town voted in favor of the article, the Board of Selectmen approved it, and a debt exclusion referendum 
went before the Town and was passed at a general election on May 23, 2000. The Town executed a contract 
with John T Callahan & Son Contractors in September. Groundbreaking for the two new schools was 
celebrated on Friday, October 6 at 4 P.M. The School Building Committee comprised of: Mark Johnson 
(Chair), Jack Driscoll, Bernie Morrissey, Alan Champagne, Ray Hender, Tina Girdwood (also a member of the 
School Committee), and Claudia Bach (Superintendent of Schools) met monthly throughout fall, 2000 to 
oversee construction. In fall, 2000 the School Committee appointed a Redistricting Task Force charged to 
develop a proposal for School Committee consideration for redistricting the current elementary and middle 
schools. 

In spring, 2000 the Superintendent presented to the School Committee for its approval an update of the 
"Short Term Space Needs Plan" which included a conversion of the R and D Room on the third floor of the 
Central Office Building into two classrooms for Doherty Middle School and of the Hart Room into a classroom 
at West Middle School. The plan contained the introduction of portable computer labs at WMS, DMS and 
South in the current year and for conversion of computer labs into classrooms in the coming year. In 2000 all 
schools continued using cafeterias, stages, and hallways for music and art classes. In both middle schools core 
curriculum teachers were required to share their classrooms, and language arts, music and art teachers 
traveled from classroom to classroom with their supplies on carts. 

School Committee and Central Administration 

The five elected members of the School Committee met at least twice monthly during the year. At the 
March election Mr. Skip Eccles ran unopposed and Mr. Gerry Gustus was elected to replace Mr. Tim 
McCarron who chose not to run. At its first meeting following the election, the Committee elected Ms. Tina 
Girdwood, Chairperson and Mr. Eric Nadworny, Secretary. 

In January 2000 a search began for a new principal at Shawsheen School to replace retiring Principal, 
Mrs. Theresa Murphy. Ms. Brenda O'Brien, Assistant Principal at Bancroft, was named Shawsheen Principal. 
In spring, 2000 the Superintendent appointed Mr. Peter Anderson Principal of Andover High School to replace 
the Interim Principal, Mr. Bruce MacDonald. 



74 



In the spring, after input from teachers, administrators and Townwide PTO, the School Committee 
approved the Goals and Objectives for the 2000-2001 school year. They are: 
Over-riding goal: Ensure exemplary schools for our children 

Working Goals: Focus on on-going improvement of teaching and learning to ensure on-going student 

improvement 

Create a long-term educational plan that focuses on the question: 
If we were to have an exemplary school program, what would it look like? 
Goal 1: Base all decisions under the basic assumption that each child is a constant learner 

Goal 2: Make schools exemplary in areas Of curriculum, instruction, assessment and support services, 

exceeding state standards where possible 
Goal 3: Commit to developing and maintaining exemplary facilities 

Goal 4: Promote positive and productive working relationships among all members of the school 

community 
Goal 5: Foster working relationship with School Committee, Selectmen and Finance Committee 

members to develop and implement strategic School/Town Planning 
Goal 6: Continue to improve community confidence in our school system 

During their annual Summer Retreat the School Committee revised their 11 -point vision statement for 
Andover Schools to read: In our vision, an exemplary school system... 

1. Focuses on the education, development and well being of all students; everyone shares the conviction 
that we should have the best possible school system. 

2. Offers a rigorous and challenging academic program to inspire the best efforts of students at every 
level. 

3. Respects fine teaching; encourages teachers to continue as active learners throughout their careers. 

4. Respects parents as vital participants in their children's education, and invites their involvement in the 
schools. 

5. Has leadership that provides a sure sense of direction to the system, inspiration to the staff, and strong 
advocacy in support of teachers. 

6. Offers stimulating extra-curricular programs in the arts, athletics, and community service. 

7. Provides a caring support staff to enable the system to increase achievements. 

8. Places high value on community involvement and encourages on-going mutual communication with 
townspeople and community organizations. 

9. Recognizes and celebrates accomplishments of both students and staff. 

10. Holds individual teachers accountable for maintaining high standards. 

11. Works with underperforming students to help them achieve success. 

12. Is always evolving — not standing still — with teachers, staff and administrators constantly seeking ways 
to improve their schools. 

13. Exhibits a culture of shared values, good citizenship and mutual respect in every school. 

The Committee directed the Superintendent to develop long range plans for Facilities, Programs, 
Governance, Human Resources, Special Education, and the Library/Media Program. These programs are in 
addition to existing long-range plans for Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment, Technology, Professional 
Development, Capital Improvement, and Budget and Financial Forecasting. All the program plans together 
constitute the school district's Comprehensive Long-Range Plan. 

Teachers and administrators made presentations to the School Committee on various topics including: 
technology infusion into the curriculum, MCAS and other assessments in our system, and high school concerns 
regarding grading, course offerings, and requirements for graduation. The Superintendent and Assistant 
Superintendent conducted separate workshops on Shared Site Based Decision Making to members of the 
School Committee, Administrators, and the Andover Education Association Executive Board. They provided 
training to the Administrative Council and the School Committee regarding new state requirements for School 
Improvement Plans. The Massachusetts Teachers Association conducted a training in Interest Based 
Bargaining for the School Committee, Administrative Council and representatives of the AEA. Interest based 
contract negotiations with the teachers began in fall, 2000. The district launched two districtwide programs for 
teachers: the Teacher Induction and Mentoring Program and a pilot of a professional growth evaluation model. 
To meet a new requirement of the State of Massachusetts, all teachers and administrators submitted to the 
Superintendent their Individual Professional Development Plans in October, 2000. 

Assistant Superintendent - Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Professional Development 

Annually, it is important to reflect upon the accomplishments of the teachers and administrators whose 
thoughtful work contributed to meeting the second year educational goals of Andover's five-year curriculum 



plan. One hundred thirty-six teachers, six assistant principals, six high school program advisors, five 
elementary principals, two middle school principals, and six K-12 program coordinators worked diligently 
during the school year and in the summer to develop a coherent and quality educational program for Andover 
students. 

Andover teachers implemented new and/or revised programs in social studies (grades 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9), 
mathematics (grades K - 3 and grade 10), science (grade 10), English language arts (grades 6, 7, 8, and 10), and 
Spanish II through a planned and coordinated set of strategies aimed at achieving the district mission and 
vision of curriculum and instruction. The program implementation included new teacher-developed 
curriculum. 

Professional development training centered on the district goals of content-related coursework in 
mathematics, science, social studies, and English, diversifying instructional strategies in the classroom, writing 
in the content areas, and technology. The Staff Development Commission provided sixty-two inservice courses 
for teachers to take on campus during the school year. 

Andover students participated in local, state, and national testing programs during the past year. 
Students in grade K - 9 took mathematics and science pilot tests developed by Andover teachers and 
administrators to measure each student's performance in achieving the grade level benchmarks. Grade 3 
students took the Iowa Test of Basic Skills in vocabulary, reading comprehension, and spelling in April 2000. 
Ninety-eight percent of the third graders tested, including those with special needs who may have 
accommodated testing procedures, and students with limited English met the state reading goal. Students in 
grades four, eight, and ten took the second MCAS (Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System) exams 
in English, mathematics, science and technology, and social science/history. The intent of these assessments is to 
raise academic standards across the Commonwealth and to make schools and students accountable. The third 
year test scores reveal that many Andover students are above the state average ("proficient" and "advanced") 
in all four subject areas. There were also a number of students who scored in the "needs improvement" and 
"failing" category. Overall, Andover ranked 13 th in the state on the third round of MCAS testing. In the area of 
college admission test scores, 95% of Andover High School Students took the SAT I with a high score of 1122. 
One hundred twenty-six students took 234 Advanced Placement examinations and achieved an average score of 
3.8. The class of 2000 had 5 semi-finalists and 5 commended students recognized by the National Merit 
Scholarship Program. 

Several Andover administrators, Brenda O'Brien, David Nichols, Cheri Webb, and Marinel McGrath 
wrote and received $550,265 in state, federal, and private foundation grants. The grants funded curriculum 
development and professional development opportunities for teachers and administrators in the areas of 
mathematics, science, reading, writing, social studies, technology and media, health education, advanced 
placement course development in environmental science, lesson development and materials for gifted and 
talented students, assessment development, and teacher induction and mentoring programs. 

In summary, the initiatives in curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development 
continue to advance the coherence and quality of our educational program. There are many goals yet to realize 
which are dependent upon high levels of budget funding. Our professional staff must have the resources if we 
are to continue to be competitive with similar school districts in developing and providing a high quality 
educational program for all of our students in the Andover Public Schools. 

Business Office 

The primary responsibility of the Business Office is the development and oversight of the Annual 
School Budget. This includes constructing the budget, monitoring expenditures, administering the financial 
provisions of labor contracts, purchasing, preparation of the Five Year Financial Forecast, development of the 
Five Year Capital Improvement Plan and tracking grant awards and disbursements. In addition to financial 
oversight, the Business Office is responsible for facilities management, system-wide technology, student 
transportation and food services. 

• The Annual Five Year Capital Improvement Plan was updated to reflect the current and projected needs of 
the School Department. In conjunction with building principals and the Department of Plant and Facilities, 
priorities were set and cost estimates established. The Plan was submitted to the Town Manager in September 
to be included in the town's annual Capital Improvement Program for Fiscal Year 2002. 

* The Information Systems (IS) Department has provided extensive, ongoing training for administrators and 
support staff at the eight schools in the use of student management software. Also, IS has worked closely with 
the Department of Education to achieve compliance with DOE's new Information Management System, and, in 
fact, Andover was recently one of the first districts in Massachusetts to successfully submit its student files, 
electronically. In addition, the IS department has been working on a long-range project to implement special 
needs software at all schools. This includes installing new hardware and software and training users to create 
Individual Education Plans from remote locations, which are then available to the Pupil Personnel Office. 

76 



• The Five Year Financial Forecast is an important management tool that was updated to reflect anticipated 
additional costs associated with the two new school coming on line in September, 2002. 

• In conjunction with the Human Resources Department, many workshops and seminars were attended to 
learn about the new early retirement law for teachers and administrators and how to implement it. Extensive 
information was gathered in preparation for meetings with staff who indicated they would be retiring under 
this program. 

• With two new schools coming on line in 2002, a Redistricting Task Force was established. The Business 
Office plays a vital role in providing the Task Force with information about bus routes and current and 
projected enrollment data. 

Human Resource Office 

The Human Resource Office is pleased to be part of the new direction that collective bargaining is 
taking within the school department. Under the auspices of the Massachusetts Teachers Association's Training 
Division and with the strong support and leadership of the Superintendent and School Committee, the Human 
Resource Director participated in a series of intensive training programs on the topic of interest-based 
bargaining, an approach to labor relations conceptualized by Richard Fisher and William Ury in their seminal 
work Getting to YES . As a member of several negotiating teams within the school department, the Human 
Resources Director's goal is to utilize this training to bring about the amenable resolutions to organizational 
issues not only in formal negotiations, but in every day problem-solving. 

For the first time in many years, the Human Resources Office experienced significant recruitment 
challenges in hiring many new teachers needed to fill vacancies that annually occur as a result of retirements 
and child rearing leaves. This year, the Human Resource team worked diligently to hire some 46 teachers and 
five administrators, including a new high school principal, elementary principal at Shawsheen School, and 
assistant principal at Bancroft School. As has been widely reported in the news media, the teacher shortage has 
wreaked havoc with staffing schools across the State. Especially hard hit are the areas of mathematics, science, 
foreign language and special education. Human Resource staff are responding to this crisis with more 
aggressive recruitment strategies for this fall, which include: the exploration of several internet recruitment 
sites, the attendance at several recruitment fairs, and more aggressive outreach to universities and colleges. 

The Town, too, had a record number of annual hires, 52 in all. Among the more notable include the 
Fire Chief, a Senior Planner, a Network Administrator, two Project Managers, a Project Engineer and a Land 
Conservation Manager. We also hired a firefighter and two patrolmen and are pleased to report internal 
promotions within the Police and Fire Departments to the following positions: Fire Deputy, two men to the 
position of Fire Lieutenant, Police Sergeant and Police Lieutenant. Finally, pursuant to the enactment of 
Chapter 114 of the Acts of 2000, the human resources and school business offices have been busy assisting 
teachers apply on-line for enhanced retirement benefits. To date, fourteen teachers have declared their 
intention to retire within the next year and half under the new regulations. 

School Reports 

Andover High School 

• Social Studies Department 

The Social Studies department has continued its process of change throughout the 2000-2001 academic y ear. 
We are currently in year three of a five-year plan for aligning our curriculum with the Massachusetts State 
frameworks and updating our offerings for students. During the summer of 2000 members of the department 
completed the revision of the tenth grade curriculum and produced a comprehensive curriculum guide for 
teachers which includes items such as teacher reference materials, sample assessments and technology based 
lessons and activities. 

The department has acquired a new textbook for the tenth grade, McDougal Littel's The Americans, and has 
been hard at work on planning its elective program to be introduced in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 academic 
years. Teachers are developing two courses for fall of 2001 - The Economy in the World Today and Democracy 
& Media Literacy. 

• English Department 

The new 9 th grade curriculum is in its second year of operation, was sponsored by the teachers last summer and 
will be reassessed again at the end of this year. We added a required portfolio of students' work and a response 
journal, to help us decided whether the goals of the curriculum are being reached and may form a basis for a 
plan to keep records of student work in both reading and writing on file throughout their four years here. 
The 10 th grade curriculum and a newly aligned 11 th grade course are in their first year of operation and will be 
assessed similarly at the end of this year. 

77 



• Foreign Language Department 

The Foreign Language Department offers French, German, Latin and Spanish. Due to increased enrollment, 
the Latin program has expanded to four years. In September, American Sign Language will be offered. 

• Mathematics Department 

We are implementing a new program for Calculus level 1, AB and BC calculus this year, and a new program 
for our level 3 students called Integrated Mathematics. This program will help the students gain a strong 
foundation of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II by using a hands-on integrated approach. 
We have incorporated a series of Calculator Based Laboratory experiments into the Algebra II and III 
curriculum. These labs should help students gain an appreciation for some real world applications of Algebra 
by doing hand-on investigations. We are also implementing a new unit on probability for our Algebra HI 
students. In the fall we administer the Mathematics League Massachusetts Olympian round I Exam to our 
advanced mathematics sophomores, junior, and seniors. In February, the advanced mathematics students 
participate in the AMC10 and AMS12 (American Mathematics Competition). 

• Science Department 

During the summer 16 staff members were involved in curriculum development projects and/or in-service 
workshops. Many teachers are implementing the computer based and calculator based laboratory 
investigations that they practiced during the Teachers Teaching With Technology workshops during the 
summer. The workshops were sponsored by a grant from Texas Instruments and the Eisenhower Science and 
Mathematics professional development funds 

• Guidance Department 

The Guidance Department continues to expand the developmental counseling program through Freshman 
orientation groups, sophomore computer assisted career exploration using Bridges.com, and the highly 
successful Choice Not Chance college planning program for juniors and seniors with corollary programs for 
parents. New evening programs, addressing the transition to college for students with special needs offered in 
the fall and spring, were added this year to respond to community needs. 
■ Athletic Department 

The Department was named the winner of the Boston Globe's "Ernest Dalton Award." This award recognizes 
the combined efforts of the top athletic programs for boys and girls in the state of Massachusetts. This is the 
second time Andover has won this award in the last eight years, and the third time overall since 1975. 

Doherty Middle School 

Continuing a decade-long trend, Doherty's student enrollment increased over the pervious year. To 
accommodate this increase, two additional classroom spaces were found on the third floor of the central 
administration building. 

As in the past, Doherty continues to offer students opportunities to develop their individual talents both 
in traditional classroom settings and during extra-curricular activities. The following is a partial list of 
innovative initiatives scheduled during the school day: Drives for the Needy, Community Outreach with 
Lazarus House, Career Day, Social Studies Game Day, Days for Biographies, Heroes, and Traditions, Selborne 
Project, 8 th Grade Farewell Wall, Revitalization of Memorial Park, and Outreach to Senior Citizens. In 
addition to these initiatives Doherty offers students an extensive extra- curricular program. Over 90% of 
Doherty's students are involved in one or more of the extra- curricular activities. 

Reflecting the school's commitment to the middle school philosophy, Doherty continues to emphasize 
the team concept- the hallmark of a true middle school. Our instructional program mirrors the system's 
standards-based curriculum design. 

West Middle School 

This year the focus at West Middle School was in the areas of literacy development, technology 
integration, and support for at-risk students and increased community outreach. Weekly reading periods and 
an ever expanding media collection produced strong results in standardized testing. The author series in which 
speakers joined students in the media center for Brown Bag lunches exposed our students to the excitement of 
writing and reading. Many of our young writers produced literary articles for the school's creative writing 
journal and the Greater Lawrence Collaborative's Applesauce publication. A pilot laptop computer program 
increased the use of technology in all curriculum classrooms as teachers and students investigated the use of the 
Internet as a resource for research and project-based learning. New program offerings for specific student 
populations were also initiated. In collaboration with Merrimack College, a Latino mentoring program 
brought college minority students in contact with our Latin American students supporting their social and 
academic growth. A new peer mediator program initiated our student leaders in conflict resolution strategies. 
The Bridge of Kindness, a community service requirement, continued with all students pledging five hours of 
their time to a wide variety of individual outreach endeavors. Over one third of the student population this 
year participated in drama, bringing their energy and enthusiasm to the stage as the school sought ways by 



which to share the diverse talents of our students with the West community. Each of these initiatives is the 
result of worthwhile budgetary allocations that have strengthened the development of the middle level program. 

Bancroft School 

Professional development continues to be a major initiative at the Bancroft School. We have recently 
purchased an eight-part video series titled "The Effective Teacher." This award winning video series features 
Harry K. Wong, one of the foremost speakers in the field of education. Next, we have creatively expanded team 
level planning time for the purpose of professional development. We have created monthly two-hour teacher 
training blocks. This time will be spent on the sharing of effective practices, with a focus on management of 
assessment and differentiation of instruction in each classroom. Parents will serve as substitute teachers 
during those times. The Department of Education has recognized us as a technology professional development 
site. Our initial initiative was a Lighthouse Technology Grant with an award of $18,500. Since then, we have 
been awarded successive Lighthouse Grant proposals for upwards of $30,000. Also, in September of 2000, we 
were successful in securing a Department of Education Technology Mentor Grant with a monetary award of 
$10,000. We have also been able to provide training to other districts across the state through their adoptive 
grants. Finally, in terms of grants, our Literacy Support Team has developed a proposal for the MEET Grant 
(Massachusetts Empowering Educators with Technology) through the Department of Education. As a result of 
these grants, we have been able to fuse technology into all of the professional development activities that we 
provide to our staff. 

Henry C. Sanborn Elementary School 

Our 2000-2001 theme, Broaden Your Horizons - Think Globally, provided an opportunity for 
curriculum integration and enrichment. Teachers used Time for Kids in every classroom to bring students in 
touch with the world around them. Students followed the Olympics from Sydney, Australia and also 
participated in the National Student Mock Election sponsored by the John F Kennedy Museum. A reading 
incentive program entitled, "Around the World in 180 Days - Sanborn's Passport to Reading 2000-2001" 
challenged each participating student to read 20 books with a school goal of 2001 books read by June. Based on 
current performance, we expect to double our goal. Weekly content-specific vocabulary and research question 
challenges were coordinated with the theme as well as special activities within each of Sanborn's classrooms. 
The Sanborn community continued to support a tradition of caring about and giving to others. The clearest 
example was our annual Harvest Festival. This year more than 300 gift bags loaded with home baked bread, 
fruit, candy, jello, tea bags, and plants donated by Mahoney's Too in Tewksbury were assembled and delivered 
to Seniors by our fifth grade students on November 17th. The Senior Citizens and special guests from our 
school community were invited to our Harvest Festival Performance by our fourth and fifth grade students. 
The Harvest Festival, in its 22nd year, helps our students to put Sanborn's four R's into practice by 
demonstrating Respect for our senior citizens, Responsibility for learning and carrying out their parts in the 
Harvest Festival Pageant, Resourcefulness in gathering all of the donations for the gift bags, and Reflection on 
the value of making a positive contribution to the lives of others. We continue to be grateful for the support of 
our many parent volunteers and for the value placed on education by the greater Andover community. 

Shawsheen Elementary School 

The year 2000 marked two very special celebrations at Shawsheen School - the 75 th Birthday 
Anniversary of its opening and recognition of the outstanding career and educational contributions of Principal 
Theresa G. Murphy upon her retirement after 32 years of service to the children and families of the Andover 
Public Schools. A number of new curricular initiatives were also achieved this year. Shawsheen's thematic, 
integrated primary program was recognized as a Talents Unlimited Model Demonstration Site, one of only 
sixteen locations throughout the nation. Talents Unlimited is a nationally recognized thinking skills program 
designed to help teachers recognize and nurture the multiple talents of children. The program encourages and 
trains children to use higher level thinking skills including productive thinking, forecasting, decision-making, 
planning and communication in the context of the core curriculum. Shawsheen was also awarded a 
Department of Education Technology Challenge Mentor Grant to integrate the use of technology within the 
elementary curriculum, to further enhance writing across all curricular areas and to incorporate the school 
wide theme of Space. Continuing last year's goal to increase social skills and responsible student behavior, 
grade level staff participated in Open Circle Training at Wellesley College. Open Circle is a grade- 
differentiated curriculum for elementary students taught twice a week that focuses in three major content 
areas; creating a cooperative classroom environment, solving interpersonal problems, and building positive 
relationships. Shawsheen also became home this year to the new Foster Grandparent Volunteer Program. The 
program is sponsored by the Merrimack Valley Chamber of Commerce to support literacy initiatives in 
schools. The school-wide integrating theme a "2001 Space Odyssey" has provided a wonderful backdrop for a 
variety of enrichment events and activities. A guest meteorologist, NASA astronaut, and portable Star Lab 
planetarium were scheduled with the generous suppor/tpf the PTO. 



South Elementary School 

The 1999-2000 school year began with 613 students and our school theme, South LINKS to Success 
(Life-long learning, Involvement, Networking, Kindness, Support). South School is built on collaboration and 
caring, qualities necessary to support student learning and achievement. Our school beliefs of respect, 
responsibility, diversity, and lifelong learning continue to be our guiding values. South tradition has continued 
to emphasize the fostering of a strong school culture through active student government, participatory decision- 
making and close ties with the parent community. The uniqueness of South is multi-faceted, the result of a 
carefully crafted combination of concrete and abstract ingredients: 

■ Integration of technology is key at South. Students and teachers use technology in all curriculum areas 
expanding across all grade levels. Our goal is to use technology to further a learning community where 
students are engaged in thoughtful, hands-on learning activities. Current technology initiatives include: 
multimedia presentations, portable keyboards, laptop for students, computerized parent conference sheets, and 
a parent voice messaging system. 

■ South has utilized recent education research findings to improve the quality of education for our 
students. The entire staff trained in LINKS, a program that stresses the use of graphic organizers and open- 
ended question strategies. The principal works with teachers to observe and analyze teaching techniques, 
encouraging teachers to be reflective practitioners. Faculty meetings are based on themes that are chosen for 
the purpose of ensuring that all children are challenged and engaged in learning. These themes include: 
differentiated curriculum, assessment, application of Skillful Teacher concepts, and the need for high 
expectations. 

■ The parent community is highly involved, supports and embraces the vision for South. Over 400 
parents volunteer on a yearly basis. This year, we initiated PIE(Partners in Education) evenings. The central 
objective of PIE nights has been to establish a partnership with parents and community while gathering data to 
move South into the new millennium. 

West Elementary School 

West elementary School has engaged in a variety of activities during the past year. Our school-wide 
theme for this year is Listen, Learn, & Laugh. Our theme is tied to the Open Circle Curriculum that is used in 
many of the classrooms at West Elementary School. The Open Circle Curriculum stresses the importance of 
showing consideration for others and developing good communication skills, among them active listening. West 
Elementary has math Olympian teams for grades four and five and a pre-Olympian team of third graders. The 
Math Olympian program, which includes more than 50,00 teams worldwide, challenges students in grades 4-6 
to solve increasingly complex math problems. Both the grades five and four teams consistently score well. The 
grade five team, which competes against teams that include sixth graders, often scores in the top ten percent of 
all teams. Each year West elementary students participate in a number of community service projects. 
Included this year was the annual Jump Rope for Heart program, which has raised more than $3,000 this year. 
Students also contributed to the People's Pantry and other charitable organizations in the Merrimack Valley. 

In addition, West Elementary School has had a number of initiatives and programs that add to the 
overall educational experience of the students. Among them are: WERAWC-West Elementary Readers, 
Writers Conference, Student Council-Covers grades K-5, Trash detectors-help Keep West Elementary clean 
and neat, School Store-raises money for student activities, Before-School Enrichment Program, Recorder Club, 
Grade 4/5 Chorus, Grade 3 Chorus, Chess Club, Destination Imagination formerly Odyssey of the Mind, 
Genetics Institute Science Enrichment program. Johns Hopkins Talent Search, and Buddies-Upper grade 
classes paired with primary classes 

School District Department Reports 

Pupil Personnel Department 

Massive changes in the state regulations governing special education in Massachusetts (formerly 
known as Chapter 766) were implemented in September. These long awaited changes align the Massachusetts 
law (now called Regulations 28) more closely with the Federal Law (IDEA 97). The Pupil Personnel Office is 
responsible for insuring that students who are found eligible receive the appropriate educational services. 
Services continue to be offered in one or a combination of the following areas: Specially Designed Instruction, 
Health Care, Speech/Language, Occupational &/or Physical Therapy and Counseling. Although not a special 
education program, this office oversees services provided by the three English as a Second Language (ESL) 
teachers. 14.4% of 844 students of Andover's total population of 5875 are eligible for services, a slight 
decrease over last year. The state averages (17%) for Regulation 28 services, which continues to be higher than 
Andover's 14.4% by 2.6%. 

Students requiring private school placements number 49 this year compared to 44 students last year. 
The number of students requiring out-of-district placements can vary significantly from year to year depending 
on local program options and resources. It is the hope^nd expectation that the community continues to support 



the requests for the necessary resources to develop options for students that would allow them to remain in the 
community. 

Technology continues to be an important tool in order to be compliant with State and Federal record 
keeping mandates, totally new IEP forms, and data management requirements forced the expansion of software 
capacity, necessitating substantial additional training for clerical, teaching, and administrative staff, for 
assessment, instruction, and management of student data. 

Teacher training is an ongoing process to enhance and upgrade their skills in order that they can meet 
the needs of students presenting with more complex physical and mental issues. On a larger scale, district wide 
training will be required of all staff given the recent changes in both the federal and state laws that govern the 
criteria and delivery of services for students. The emphasis for service delivery has shifted, to a larger extent, to 
general educators, with special educators providing support and specific strategies for improved learning. 

The landscape of special education and the population it serves, with multiple variations, is continually 
changing. The complexity of students requiring service has increased over last year placing serious strain on 
the existing staff. Teachers and therapists have pursued additional training to meet student needs in the areas 
of instruction and technology with additional training to be directed by the district, to meet the demands of 
changes in the federal and state laws. The goal of the staff continues to be that of striving for excellence in 
educational environments while recognizing the restraints of the resources available to them. 

Health Education Department 

The Andover Health Education Department supports, delivers, and evaluates comprehensive health 
education to all students. Health educational professionals infuse a curriculum that is aligned with the 
Comprehensive Health Curriculum Framework recommended by The Massachusetts Board of Education. 
Elementary students received health education once a week. Thirty elementary classroom teachers were 
trained in social competency in the Open Circle Program at Wellesley College to increase the effectiveness of 
teaching conflict resolution skills. The opportunity for our younger students to participate in activity programs 
that promote healthy lifestyles such as "The Great Body Shop Musical" continued. Secondary students 
received health instruction in safe and drug free information. Kids for Kids, a middle school community 
services health leadership group introduced students to Team Harmony, Human Rights Squad Forums, and 
Drug Free Lifestyles. G.U.T.S. (Growing Up Taking A Stand) membership at Andover High taught students to 
take an active role as models for positive health decision making. The Men 's and Women 's Groups at Andover 
High increased support for students' addressing problems relating to dating violence, family situations, eating 
disorders, and addictive behaviors. S.A.D.D. increased awareness of alcohol and drug misuse. Making 
Connections workshop for middle school students and their parents during the school day increased awareness 
of issues that relate to dating violence and choice of friendships. "I'll Never Do That" by The Improbable 
Players and "Remote Control" by Deana's Fund were accompanied by learning centers and workshops that 
taught students how to help fellow students. 

The Parent-to-Parent Speaker Series had an established program of speakers that are directly tied to 
curriculum initiatives. Speakers increased parent awareness of such topics as violence prevention, gender 
equity, stress, and resolution of conflicts. Ross Greene spoke on "The Explosive Child," Joan Peters and James 
Levine on "She Works, He Works," Anthony Wolf on "Get Out Of My Life, But First Could You Drive Me and 
Cheryl To The Mall?" and Stephanie Meegan on "Surviving Stress Together." The Community Health 
Advisory Team, Gender Equity Task Force, and Curriculum Councils met to build safe schools and 
communities. Andover C.A.R.E.S. produced the booklet "Andover Parents Together" and distributed it to all 
secondary student's families. Staff wellness promotion via "Healthy Highlights" a health newsletter was sent 
out monthly. "Not My Kid, Not In Andover" a community forum presenting alcohol and drug awareness and 
Andover's zero tolerance policy to Grades 6-12 students and parents with the local police department was 
presented. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey Forum reported the results of the United States Center of Disease 
Control Survey. 

Arts Department 

Performing Arts: 

Over 658 students Grades 3-12 pursued instrumental study. Instrumental and vocal students 
continued to participate through the audition process for district and state ensembles, and earned the 
following awards: 

■ Six AHS students All-State 1 vocal, 5 instrumental 

■ Thirteen students Senior District 6 vocal, 7 instrumental 

■ Fourteen students Junior District 11 vocal, 3 instrumental 

Andover High School student artwork was submitted to The Boston Globe and earned the following 

awards: 

81 



3 Gold Keys 

■ 4 Silver Keys 

■ 4 Honorable Mentions 
Dramatic Arts: 

For the first time Andover hosted The New England Drama Festival. Over three days, thirteen high 

schools from the six New England states performed their winning one-act plays. 

Notable Accomplishments: 

Andover High School Marching Band received a Gold Medal at The New England Scholastic Band 

Association Finals. 

The Andover High School play "Firebugs" competed in the New England Drama Festival Semi-finals 

Educational Technology Department 

During the past year, the Andover Public Schools Technology Department has purchased, configured, 
and installed 100 new personal computers. These computer systems were used to update the computers in the 
Andover High School Media Center computer lab, the AHS Media Center, the AHS Special Education 
Department classrooms/offices, the Andover High School Guidance Department, and Middle Schools' Media 
Centers. The existing AHS Media Center and Guidance Department computers were moved and reconfigured 
to address the needs in the AHS English Department classrooms and Special Education offices throughout all 
Andover schools. The existing Middle Schools' computers were moved and reconfigured to address district 
Special Education computing needs to meet new state information system standards and requirements. 

The Andover Public Schools began a laptop pilot program at Doherty Middle School, West Middle 
School, and South Elementary School. The pilot program is comprised of two components: (1) laptops for ten 
teachers in each school; and (2) three mobile laptop labs configured with wireless connectivity to the district 
network system. Three mobile laptop computer labs comprised of thirty Toshiba laptop computers were 
purchased and installed to understand the training requirements necessary for our students, understand the 
classroom dynamics when every student has a laptop computer and try to determine the effects of the laptop 
computers on the learning process. 

Physical Education Department 

The Physical Education Department provides instruction to all K-12 students enrolled in the school 
system. Adapted Physical Education provided instruction and service to approximately 300 students ranging 
from preschool to high school age. The physical education staff continues its on-going process to align K-12 
goals and objectives with the standards, benchmarks and assessments outlined in the Massachusetts Health 
Frameworks. The National Standards for Physical Education "Moving into the Future" serves as the 
foundation for Andover's standards and assessments. These standards, developed over the past two years, 
outline the benchmarks necessary to maintain a sequential and progressive approach to providing physical 
education instruction and learning. The Curriculum/Program consists of the following: 

• Work continues on revisions to the high school Personal Fitness curriculum. The staff has begun to develop 
an alternative option for students to enroll in a personal fitness course that will satisfy department 
graduation requirements. 

• Work has begun to develop a second Project Challenge course. Students in this course will be trained to 
assist physical education staff in the Project Challenge 1 course. 

• The high school physical education "High 5" program implemented by the staff was successful. This 
program recognizes students for frequently demonstrating unsolicited positive behavior and actions that go 
a step above normal expectations. 

• Rubrics were developed for K-5 standards, benchmarks and assessments. The high school rubrics will be 
developed following completion of course revisions. 

• For the second consecutive year the Adapted Physical Education staff was invited to present their program 
at the National AAHPERD Convention held in Orlando, Florida. 

• The D.O.E. as a result of their Coordinated Program Review recognized the Adapted Physical Education 
program as a commendable program. 

• West Elementary students and physical education teachers, Arthur Iworsley and Louise Rozzi, were 
recognized for their efforts at a Jump Rope for Heart awards ceremony at Bridgewater State College. 

• Dance activity has been included in the high school after school intramural program and is expected to 
continue through the school year. 

• Three high school staff members have been invited to present this year at the state MAHPERD Convention 
in Worcester. 

• 208-4th and 5 th graders voluntarily ran in the 10th annual 1-mile cross-country run held at the high school 
on the afternoon of October 17. 

82 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



Greater Lawrence Technical School is a regional vocational secondary institution serving 
the communities of Andover, Lawrence, North Andover and Methuen. The student body is 
comprised of approximately 1400 students, 16 of whom are residents of Andover. The graduate 
placement rate for 2000 is 81%, and business and industry Co-op agreements total 2204. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School has taken major steps toward meeting the challenges 
of the Education Reform mandates and has adopted the High Schools That Work Model. The 
career and technical education programs continue to build upon student career preparedness 
through a restructured cluster model that integrates interdisciplinary, competency and inquiry 
based curriculum into four career clusters or academies. 

The four career academies are: Advanced Technology, Business Communications, 
Construction, and Service. A Freshman Academy is designed for all freshmen to explore the 
various majors before full time academic commitment. The majors offered at Greater Lawrence 
include: Allied Health, CAD/Machine Drafting, Cosmetology, Electrical/Electronics, Food 
Technology/Clothing Design, Office Tech, Auto body, Construction & Building, Culinary Arts, 
Plumbing/HVAC, Automotive, Carpentry, Distributive Education, Graphics, Metal Fabrication. 

2000 Highlights 

• $51M Building Expansion is on schedule and the groundbreaking is scheduled for June 
2001. 

• The New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) has granted a 10 Year 
re-accreditation to Greater Lawrence Tech with many commendations for the programs, 
staff and responsiveness to the changing demographics of the school's service area. 

• Two Academic Support Grant Programs were offered to students in summer and After 
School (PASS Program) to increase academic proficiencies and MCAS test results. 

Andover Community Service Projects 

Building a low-income house in coordination with Andover Community Trust. 

Produced Graphics and Printing for Andover Millennium Committee. 

Students participated in Andover Chamber of Commerce's "Taste of Andover". 

Update Spring Grove Cemetery mapping to CAD (CAD/Machine Department). 

Metal Fab repair of 30 classroom chairs for Andover Middle School. 

Culinary Arts prepared and served food at ACT groundbreaking ceremony. 

Cosmetology students gave shampoos, sets and manicures on Andover Senior Citizens 

Day. 

Use of Food Tech area by the Andover Department of Community Services. 

Print Andover School Committee Newsletter. 



83 



ANDOVER PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise 
the Town concerning the preservation of its historic and archeological resources. 

Demolition Delay Bylaw: 

The Commission heard demolition requests for eighteen properties. Three were 
delayed six months, nine were approved, two were continued and one was declared an 
emergency demolition. Eight other permits were reviewed for historic appropriateness. 

Local Historic Districts: 



The Ballardvale Local Historic District Commission continues it's work in hearing 
proposals and advising residents about the design of historically sensitive changes to 
buildings in the district. Dennis Ingram, Chairman, is the Preservation Commission's 
representative to this Board. 

Heritage Education: 

The Andover Preservation Awards were held in May of 2000 at Memorial Hall 
Library in cooperation with the Andover Historical Society to recognize outstanding 
examples of preservation in the community. Ten property owners were recognized for 
their efforts. 

Other Projects of Note: 

• The impending demolitions of five historic structures in the Andover Village 
Industrial National Register Historic District along North Main Street and Stevens 
Street, will have a significant impact on the historic integrity of this district and 
threaten the viability of the district itself. 

• With demand for housing at a high level and limited available land, demolition of 
moderately priced small houses is becoming more common. The "mansionization" 
phenomenon continues to occur in Andover on a lot-by-lot basis and poses a serious 
threat to historic residential neighborhoods. The Town does not currently have a 
means of addressing size of house to lot size to keep a newly constructed house in 
conformity with its surrounding neighborhood. The Preservation Commission is 
committed to working to develop zoning by-laws which will address this 
phenomenon. 

• The Community Preservation Act signed into law by Governor Cellucci this Fall is 

now available for adoption by individual towns. Its consideration at a future Town 
Meeting and adoption by Town-wide vote is strongly supported by the Preservation 
Commission as a proactive means to preserve historic structures, open space and 
quality of life within the Town of Andover. 



84 



Phillips Academy has won approval to build an ice skating rink on the site of the 
historic Pearson Farm House. The farmhouse was successfully removed to a new site 
on South Main Street where it will be restored. 

Two small structures, an early 19th century blacksmith shop and an 18 th century 
weaving shop, were successfully disassembled and moved from their original site at 
the David Gray Farm on Salem Street to the Andover Historical Society on Main 
Street. They will be reconstructed and used for educational purposes at that location. 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

The purpose of the Commission is to ensure that changes and additions are 
harmonious to the District and to prevent changes that might detract from the aesthetic 
and historic value of the District. 

The Ballard Vale Historic District Commission completed its fifth year 
conducting eleven regular meetings, one public hearing, and one special meeting. 

There were fourteen applications submitted to the Commission during the year. 
The applications included repair and renovation of existing buildings, (including 
additions and garage replacement), and various types of fence installations. All 
applications received approval from the Commission. One application received a 
Certificate of Hardship. 

The Commission began the year with eight of the nine positions filled with seven 
members who are residents of the district and one member, an architect, who also serves 
on the Andover Preservation Commission. In December 2000, Sherron Heller resigned 
after serving five years on the Commission. Sherron was an original member of the 
Commission. The Commission would like to thank Sherron for her many contributions 
since her appointment on November 27, 1995. Ron Kravette, who served as an alternate 
member for one year, recently moved from Andover and resigned from the Commission. 
In June 2000, Richard Bowen, returned to the Commission as an alternate member, and in 
December 2000, Mary Bogan also became an alternate commission member. 

The Commission completed the revisions to its procedural rules and regulations as 
well as the planning for the five signs to be placed at various entry points to the District. 
The Commission has attended several workshops regarding parking at the Ballard Vale 
Commuter Rail Station. Member Chris Huntress is also serving as a member of the 
Ballard Vale Traffic Task Force. 



85 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



1998 1999 2000 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for Rabies 

Number of animals testing positive for Rabies 

Number of cats quarantined for Rabies 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef cattle over two years 

Number of beef cattle under two years 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 

Number of donkeys 

Number of horses (includes work & saddle horses) 

Number of ponies 

Number of goats 

Number of sheep 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds (one animal constitutes a herd) 



The annual Rabies Immunization Clinic was held on Saturday, April 29, 2000 at the West 
Middle School. 



24 


23 


32 


18 


15 


19 

2 


157 


132 


61 


19 


20 


19 


58 


16 


31 


20 


8 


10 





8 





3 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


55 


84 


74 


15 


21 


12 


11 


8 


1 


1 


2 


1 


121 


102 


100 


2 


2 


1 



86 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June, 1 948. The regular monthly meetings 
of the Board of Commissioners are held on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court 
Community Room with the exception of the January, May and October meetings which are held in 
the Frye Circle Community Room located at 256 North Main Street. Board Members are as follows: 

Ronald Hajj - Chairperson 

Norma Villarrel - Vice Chairman 

James Cuticchia - Treasurer 

Francis O'Connor - Member 

Hartley Burnham - Governor's Appointee 

Christine Metzemaekers - Executive Director 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 21 8 units of state-aided elder/disabled housing, 56 
units of family housing, 7 leased housing units under the Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program, 6 
units under the state-aided Alternative Housing Voucher Program and 8 units of housing under the 
Massachusetts Chapter 689 program. In addition, the Authority administers 127 Section 8 Vouchers 
which are federally funded through the Department of Housing and Urban Development. 



STATE FUNDED PROGRAMS : Income Limits 




1 person 

2 people 

3 people 


$34,050 
$38,900 
$43,800 


4 people $48,650 

5 people $52,550 

6 people $56,400 


7 people $60,300 

8 people $59,800 


Apartment turnover 2000: 44 Elder/Disabled units 
Average rent: $238 Elder/Disabled Program 


10 Family units 
$238,000 Family Program 


FEDERALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS: Section 8 Rent Assistance Income Limits 


1 person 

2 people 

3 people 


$21,300 
$24,300 
$27,350 


4 people $30,400 

5 people $32,850 

6 people $35,250 


7 people $37,700 

8 people $40,150 



SECTION 8 FAMILY SELF SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM: 
25 slots allotted - 22 filled and/or completed to date. 
STATE-FUNDED MODERNIZATION WORK : Begun in 2000 

• $ 1 70,300 Window Replacement - Chestnut Cour 

• $423,203 On-going Site Improvements - Memorial Circle, Chestnut Court and Grandview 
Terrace 



87 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle, long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on sixteen (24) cases, disbursing 
$37,673.84 on approved cases. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
$345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the direction of the 
Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the 
Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 1999 $161,969.43 

Receipts - 2000 26,787.15 

$188,756.58 
Disbursements - 2000 37,679.84 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2000 $151,076.74 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, chosen on a staggered basis, by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved no applications during the year. 



Balance on hand 6/30/99 $43,163.65 

Income - FY-2000 2,330.91 

Expenditures - FY-2000 

Balance as of 6/3 0/00 $45,494.56 



88 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31,2000 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 



1/1/00 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



Securities @ Book 280,724.71 -Gain/(Loss) - Sate of Securities 
Res. for Cost/Mkt. (9,643.92) -Reinvest Mutual Fd. Cap. Gains 

-Transfers from Reserve Fund 
- Adj. to lower of Cost/Market 



($12,321 .98) Securities @ Book 
9,122.72 Res. for Cost/Mkt. 
0.00 
(26,756.29) 



12/31/00 

277,525.45 
(36,400.21) 



$271,080.79 



Decrease 



($29,955.55) 



$241,125.24 



Savings Account 
Checking Account 
Money Market Fund 



OPERATING ACCOUNTS 
(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNT) 
INCOME 



$6,257.37 Dividends Received 
4,501 .87 Interest Received-Bonds/Notes 
6,484 29 Capital Gain Distributions 



$17,243.53 





57853 






Income Total 


$12,103.76 


EXPENSES 




Andover High School Projects 
Misc. Operating Expenses 


$12,826.15 
854.91 


Expense Total 


$13,681.06 


Net Gain/(Loss) 


($1 ,577,30) 



$10,035.51 Savings Account $6£33_22 

725.00 Checking Account 5,353.59 

764.72 Money Market Fund 3,77942 



$15,666.23 



$288,324.32 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



$256,791.47 



89 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2000 
CAPITAL ACCOUNT 



PRINCIPAL FUND 



MUTUAL FUNDS 
1,046.455 Shs. 

921.788 Shs. 
8,247.417 Shs. 
4,550.412 Shs. 
2,049.459 Shs, 

846.494 Shs. 

918.336 Shs. 



Delaware Decatur Equity Income Fund, CI. B 
Delaware Select Growth Fund, CI. B 
Federated High Income Bond Fund, CI.B 
Frankl|n Utilities Fund.CIC 
Pioneer High Yield Fynd.CI.B 
PSE Technology 100 Index Fund 
Seligman Comm. & Info. Fund.CI B 

TOTAL MUTUAL FUNDS 



BOOK VALUE 



$21,717.68 
33,000-00 
95,000.00 
46,54442 
23,507,29 
24,346.26 
23,535.45 

267,651.10 



MARKET VALUE 
OVER/(UNDER) 
MARKET VALUE BOOK VALUE 



SECURITIES = BONDS/NOTES 

$10,000 IBM Note,7.250%,Due 11/1702 

TOTAL BONDS/NOTES 

TOTAL SECURITIES 



RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 
TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



ANDOVER BANK CD ACCOUNT 
MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - FleetBoston 

TOTAL FUNDS 



S.874.35 



$18,595.51 
26,270.96 
70,267.99 
52,693.77 
21,314.37 
20,993.05 
20,864.59 

231,000.24 



10,125.00 



($3,122.17) 
(6,729.04) 

(24,732.01) 
6,149.35 
(2,192,92) 
(3,353.21) 
(2,870.86) 



(36,650.86) 



250.65 



Decrease in Market Value from 1/1/00 



9,874.35 


1.0,125.00 


250.65 


277,525,45 


241,125,24 


(36,400,21) 


(36,400.21) 




36,400.21 


$241,125.24 


$241,125.24 


$0.00 


$6,533,22 






3,779.42 


$10,312.64 




$10,312.64 


$0.00 


$5,353.59 


$5,353.59 


$0.00 


BisEsssasBs::: 


============== 


============== 


$256,791.47 


$256,791.47 
($31 ,532.85) 


$0.00 



90 



H.W.& M.P. BARNARD 

J.W. BARNARD 

ALICE M. BELL 

THOMAS BLACK 

EDNAG.CHAPIN 

FRED W.DOYLE 

WARREN F. DRAPER 

WILLIAM G. GOLDSMITH 

ELIZABETH T. GUTTERSON 

MYRON E. GUTTERSON 

ANDOVER GRANGE 

NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 

MARGARET F. fHINCHCLIFFE 

PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 

ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 

HENRY WYATT 

A.F.B. & W A TROW 

RES. FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER. MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING: DECEMBER 31 ,2000 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 





ADDITIONS 


CURRENT 








BALANCE 


TO 


YEAR 


SUB 


LESS 


BALANCE 


1/1/00 


PRINCIPAL 


NET INCOME 


TOTAL 


AWARDS 


12/31/00 


$1,110.38 




$31.03 


$1,141.41 


$0.00 


$1,141.41 


9,632.11 




253.53 


9,885.64 


275.00 


9,610.64 


1,438.66 




37.85 


1 ,47651 


42.00 


1,434.51 


17,513.13 




641.08 


18,154.21 


1,000.00 


17,154.21 


3,296.23 




66.72 


3,382.35 


94.00 


3,288.95 


13,566.94 




354.23 


13,921.17 


1,000.00 


12,921.17 


2,121.34 




55.76 


2,177.10 


60.00 


2,117.10 


3,133.93 




83.01 


3,216.94 


0.00 


3.216.94 


1,456.25 




38.94 


1,495.19 


42.00 


1,453.19 


1,724.54 




45.67 


1 ,770.21 


0.00 


1 ,770.21 


3,582.94 




3439 


3,677.33 


102.00 


3,575.33 


20,761.69 




1,153.05 


21,914.74 


1,000.00 


20.914.74 


40,993.63 




1,076.54 


42,070.17 


2,500.00 


39.570.17 


13,500.40 




353.89 


13,854.29 


385.00 


13,469.29 


34£3SL21 




908.13 


35547.40 


Z000.Q0 


33.547.40 


11,300.86 


1,610.00 -A) 


322.73 


13,233.59 


500.00 


t2,733.53 


89,162.84 




4,440.85 


93,603.69 


5,000.00 


88,603.69 


(1,053.18) 




(8,501.47) 


(9,554.65) 




(9,554.65) 


$267,881.90 


$1,610.00 


$1,475.99 


$270,967.89 


$14,000.00 


$256,367.69 



SUMMARY-INCOMI/(IXPEN3E) 

Interest Income 

Dividend Income 

Capital Gain Distributions 

Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Securities 

Brokerage Fees/Taxes 

Adj. for Lower of Cost/Market 

NET INCOME 



(A- Add'! funds contributed by Town Employees- 7/00, 



$3,009.74 
7,934.94 
7.217.30 

(8,176.52) 
(8.00) 

(8,501.47) 



$1,475.99 



FUNDS HELD 



ANDOVER BANK CD'S (2) 
ALLIANCE MONEY MARKET FUND 
466.224 Shs. DELAWARE DECATUR INCOME FUND 
418.994 Shs. DELAWARE SELECT GROWTH FUND 
7,386.048 Shs. FEDERATED HIGH INCOME BOND FUND 
1 ,203.435 Shs. TEMPLETON GROWTH FUND 
ALLIANCE MONEY MARKET/ TROW FUND 
2,448.303 Shs. PIONEER EQUITY INCOME/TROW FUND 
1,389.696 Shs. PIONEER MICRO CAP/TROW FUND 
$5,000 IBM NOTE,7.250%,1 1/1/02 
RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 

TOTAL 



MARKET 


BOOK 




VALUE 


VALUE 


Variance 


28,62357 


28,62357 


$0.00 


13,744.26 


13,744.26 


0.00 


8,284.80 


9.079.44 


(794 £4) 


1 1 ,941 .33 


15,000.00 


(3,058.67) 


62,929.13 


64,000.00 


(21,070.87) 


21,770.14 


22,509.73 


(739.59) 


7,166.50 


7.166L50 


0.00 


67,720.06 


54,036.29 


13,683.77 


29,725.60 


27,400.30 


2324.70 


5,062.50 


4,361.85 


100.65 




(9,554.65) 


9.554.65 



$256,967.89 



$256,967.89 



$0.00 



91 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

BALANCE SHEET 

06/30/00 



GENERAL 
FUND 



ENTERPRISE 



CAPITAL 
PROJECT 



SPEC REVE 



TREASURER'S 
TRUST FUNDS 



GRAND TOTAL 



ASSETS 

Cash and Equivelants 
Other Investments 
Accounts Recievables: 

Property Taxes 

Excise Taxes 

Water & Sewer Charges 

Tax Liens 

Deferred Tax 

Departmental Revenue 

Tax Foreclosure 

Special Assessments 

Due from other Governments 

Deposits w/lnsurers 

Total Cash & Recievables 



9,425,70837 3.648,593.80 1.131,483.29 12,752,95048 1,777,46024 7.173.96968 



1,158,609.34 
729.077.22 

0.00 1.314.232 10 632,797.17 

1.231,216.45 31,777.22 12,668 76 

92.252.39 
250,082.39 
201,194.54 

5.543 10 19,458.15 561.483.52 

3.768.95 



35.910.165.86 



1,158,609.34 

729,077.22 

1,947,029 27 

1,275.662 43 

92.252.39 

250.082.39 

201,194.54 

586,484 77 

3,76895 

308,632.00 



13,097,452.75 5,014.061.27 2,338.432.74 12,752,950.48 



1,777,460.24 7,482.601.68 



0.00 42.462,959.16 



Other Assets 

Amounts to be Provided for: 
Total Assets 



64,300,000.00 64,300,000.00 



13,097.45275 5,014,061.27 2,338,432.74 12.752,950.48 



1,777,460.24 



7,482,60168 64,300,00000 106.762.959 16 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 
Warrants Payable 
Liabilities Due Depositors 
Accrued Payroll Withholdings 
Reserve for Abatements 
Deferred Revenue 
Repayment of Long Term Debt 

Total Liabilities 



123 48 -21.49 

0.00 5.505.55 

32,345.61 
1.656,887.11 
2,014,857.27 1,365,46747 1.206,94945 



308,643 09 



64,300.000 00 



101.99 

314,148.64 

32.345.61 

1,656.887.11 

4,587,274.19 

64,300,00000 



3,704.213.47 1.365,44598 1.212,455.00 



0.00 



308.643.09 64.300.000.00 70,890.757.54 



Fund Balances 

Unreserved 
Reserved for 

Continued Appropnations 
Encumbrances 
Petty Cash 

Reserve for Expenditures 
Designated for. 

Over/Under Assessments 
Appropriation Deficits 

Total Fund Balances 
Total Liab & Fund Balance 



5.909,462.28 2.889,561 55 



2,067,540 10 
374.549 90 



1,050.000.00 



-8.313.00 



1.406.364 24 



10.342,688.32 
2,410,262.16 



0.00 18.300,400.01 

12,410.22842 

3,748.790.19 

000 

1,050,000.00 

-8.313.00 











371,096.00 






371,096.00 


9,393,239.28 


3,648,615.29 


1.125,977 74 


12,752,950 48 


1,777,460 24 


7,173,95859 


00 


35,872.201 62 


13.097,452.75 


5,014,061.27 


2,338,432.74 


12,752,950.48 


1,777,460.24 


7,482.601.68 


64,300.000.00 


106.762,959 16 



92 



Town of Andover, Massachusetts 

Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures 

and Changes in Fund Balances 

All Governmental Fund Types and Expendable Trust Funds 

June 30, 2000 



Fiduciary 





Governmental Fund Type 




Proprietary 


Fund Type 


Fund Type 


Total 






Capital 


Special 


Water 


Sewer 


Expendable 


(Memorandum 




General 


Projects 


Revenue 


Enterprise 


Enterprise 


Trust 


Only) 


Revenues: 
















Real Estate 


59,667,144.00 












59,667,144.00 


Personal Property 


1,488,290.00 












1,488,290.00 


Tax Title Redemptions 


206,172.00 












206,172 00 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


4,045,265.00 












4,045,265.00 


Intergovernmental 


9,696,715.00 












9,696,715.00 


Other Excise 


777,950.00 












777,950.00 


Penalties and Interest 


216,267.00 












216,267.00 


Payments in Lieu of Taxes 


2,016.00 












2,016.00 


Charges for Services - Water 








7,032,944 00 






7,032,944.00 


Charges for Services - Sewer 










2,809,143.00 




2,809,143.00 


Fees 


681,244.00 












681,244.00 


DMM Facilities Rental 














0.00 


Departmental Revenue - Schools 


9,689.00 




2,223,010.23 








2,232.699.23 


Departmental Revenue - Libraries 














0.00 


Departmental Revenue - Cemeteries 














0.00 


Departmental Revenue- Recreation 


499,921.00 












499,921.00 


Departmental Revenue- Ambulance 














0.00 


Other Departmental Revenue 


107,033.00 












107,033.00 


Licenses and Permits 


1,327,577.00 












1,327,577.00 


Special Assessments 


803.00 












803.00 


Fines and Forfeits 


458,840.00 












458,840.00 


Investment Income 


1,116,957.00 












1,116,957.00 


Other 


148,868.00 




2,596,061.32 






2,200,968.00 


4,945,897.32 
0.00 


Total Revenues 


80,450,751.00 


0.00 


4,819,071,55 


7,032,944.00 


2,809,143.00 


2,200,968.00 


97,312,877.55 


Expenditures 
















General Government 


2,212,763.05 




2,618,873.26 






7,394,397.00 


12,226,033.31 


Community Development 


1,059,830.22 


17,998.36 










1,077,828.58 


Community Service 


1,342,717.18 












1,342,717.18 


Municipal Maintenance 


4,965,323.16 


1,088,528.32 










6,053,851 48 


Public Safety 


10,203,582.40 


669,251.57 










10,872,833.97 


Water Enteprises 




126,046.15 




2,407,199.00 






2,533,245.15 


Sewer Enterprise 




1,774,917.03 






1,135,967.00 




2,910,884.03 


Public Works 


4,674,665.17 


295,643.46 










4,970,308.63 


Library 


1,981,665.54 












1,981,665.54 


School 


37,337,297.73 


2,420,741.26 


2.090,470.61 








41,848,509.60 


Fixed 














0.00 


Insurance 














0.00 


Debt Service 


10,236,043.98 












10,236,043.98 


Retirement 


3,575,761.00 












3,575,761.00 


State & County Assessments 


980,904.00 












980,904.00 


Unclassified 


757,529.64 












757,529.64 


Other 


230,920.71 




26.248 45 


13.332.93 


3,767.60 


1.20 


274,270.89 


Total Expenditures 


79,559,003.78 


6,393,126.15 


4.735,592 32 


2,420,531.93 


1,139,734.60 


7,394,398.20 


101,642,386.98 


Other Financing Sources (Uses) 














0.00 


Other 














0.00 


Debt Activity 




4,375,000.00 










4,375,000.00 


Transfers 














0.00 


Transfers from Special Revenue 


164,560.00 




-164,560 00 








0.00 


Transfers from Enterprise Funds 


4,053,599.00 


90,000.00 




-2,902.454.00 


-1,241,145.00 




0.00 


Transfers from Trust Funds 


70,000.00 










-70,000.00 


0.00 


Transfers to Special Revenue 


-300,000.00 




300,000 00 








0.00 


Transfers to Capital Projects 


-1,097,000.00 


1,097,000.00 










0.00 


Transfers to Trust 


-4,175,000.00 










4,175,000.00 


0.00 


Temporary Borrowing 




2,866,552.00 










2,866,552.00 


Sources (Uses) 


-1,283,841.00 


8,428,552.00 


135,440.00 


-2,902,454.00 


-1,241,145.00 


4,105,000.00 


7,241,552.00 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues over 
(Under) expenditures and other 
Financing Sources (Uses) 



-392,093.78 



2,035,425.85 



218,919.23 



1,709,958.07 



428,263.40 



-1,088,430.20 



2,912,042.57 



Fund Balance July 1 , 1999 
Fund Balance June 30, 2000 



9,785,333.06 



9,393,239.28 



10,717,524.63 



1,558,541.01 



1,938,657.22 



697,714.34 



8,262,389.39 



12,752,950.48 



1,777,460.24 



3,648,615.29 1,125,977.74 



7,173,959.19 



32,960,159.65 



35,872,202.22 



93 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

RECAP OF GENERAL FUND - BUDGET 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED 06/30/2000 





RES FOR 


APPROP 


OFFSET 


RESERVE 


COMP 


OTHER 


TOTAL 


EXPENDED 


RES FOR 


TRANS TO 




ENCUM, 


(ORIGINAL) 


RECEIPTS 


FUND 


FUND 




AVAILABLE 




ENCUM 


UNREFDBL 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT 






















Personal Services 


4,000.00 


1,422,292.00 


0.00 


5,484.00 


28,533.66 


0.00 


1,460,309.66 


1,440,408.49 


19.901.17 


0.00 


Other Expenses 


141,400.06 


948,153.00 


0.00 


3,284.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,092,837.06 


895.069.93 


139,128.82 


58,638.31 




145,400.06 


2,370,445.00 


0.00 


8,768.00 


28,533.66 


0.00 


2,553,146.72 


2,335,478.42 


159,029.99 


58.638.31 


COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


922,055.00 


13,000.00 


0.00 


3.04 


0.00 


935,058.04 


906,896.90 


28.161.14 


0.00 


Other Expenses 


27,106.25 


153,846.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


180,952.25 


143,398.33 


36,205.25 


1.348.67 




27,106.25 


1,075,901.00 


13,000.00 


0.00 


3.04 


0.00 


1,116,010.29 


1,050,295.23 


64,366.39 


1.348.67 


COMMUNITY SERVICES 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


183,398.00 


182,600.00 


0.00 


16.63 


0.00 


366,014.63 


359,976.35 


2.838.28 


3,200.00 


Other Expenses 


15,577.93 


49,135.00 


273,400.00 


3,600.00 


0.00 


0.00 


341,712.93 


300,322.59 


34.014.49 


7,375.85 




15,577.93 


232,533.00 


456,000.00 


3,600.00 


16.63 


0.00 


707.727.56 


660,298.94 


36,852.77 


10,575.85 


ELDER SERVICES 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


219,778.00 


168,247.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


388,025.00 


388,025.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Other Expenses 


12,832.74 


166,460.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


179,292.74 


176,697.90 


2,594.84 


(0.00) 




12,832.74 


386,238.00 


168,247.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


567,317.74 


564,722.90 


2,594.84 


(0.00) 


MUNICIPAL MAINTENANCE 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


2,099,940.00 


110,000.00 


0.00 


135,293.95 


0.00 


2,345,233.95 


2,292,745.65 


52,488.30 


(0.00) 


Other Expenses 


605,620.28 


2,612,850.00 


70,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3,288,470.28 


2,642.577.51 


645.892.77 


(0.00) 




605,620.28 


4,712,790.00 


180,000.00 


0.00 


135,293.95 


0.00 


5,633,704.23 


4,935,323.16 


698,381.07 


(0.00) 


PUBLIC SAFETY 






















Personal Services 


37,458.45 


8,120,892.00 


479,578.00 


13,154.00 


811,237.66 


0.00 


9,462.320.11 


9,447,245.44 


15,074.67 


(0.00) 


Other Expenses 


75,832.27 


600,798.00 


7,280.00 


30,941.00 


0.00 


0.00 


714,851.27 


677,825.50 


35,637.89 


1,387.88 




113,290.72 


8,721 ,690.00 


486,858.00 


44,095.00 


811,237.66 


0.00 


10,177,171.38 


10,125,070.94 


50,712.56 


1,387.88 


DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 




















Personal Services 


0.00 


1,185,921.00 


0.00 


0.00 


56,940.23 


0.00 


1,242,861.23 


1,170,327.23 


50,000.00 


22.534.00 


Other Expenses 


25,032.76 


3,796,125.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3,821,157.76 


3,354,982.62 


303,020.73 


163.154.41 




25,032.76- 


4,982,046.00 


0.00 


0.00 


56,940.23 


0.00 


5,064,018.99 


4,525,309.85 


353,020.73 


185,688.41 


LIBRARY 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


1,405,919.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6.445.40 


0.00 


1,412,364.40 


1,381,950.39 


30,414.01 


0.00 


Other Expenses 


41,252.43 


564,148.00 


44,702.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


650.102.43 


599.715.15 


50,387.28 


0.00 




41,252.43 


1,970,067.00 


44,702.00 


0.00 


6,445.40 


0.00 


2,062.466.83 


1,981,665.54 


80,801.29 


0.00 


SCHOOL 






















Personal Services 


424,603.10 


29,595,939.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


56,489.00 


30,077,031.10 


30,077,031.10 


0.00 


0.00 


Other Expenses 


460,227.77 


6,721,823.00 


40,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


514,830.00 


7,736,880.77 


7,524,262.79 


212,617.98 


0.00 


GLRVTHS 


0.00 


120,791.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


120,791.00 


120,791.00 


0.00 


0.00 




884,830.87 


36,438,553.00 


40,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


571,319.00 


37,934,702.87 


37,722,084.89 


212,617.98 


0.00 


UNCLASSIFIED 






















Compensation Fund 


576,500.00 


900,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(1,063,334.54) 


0.00 


413,165.46 


0.00 


413,165.00 


0.46 


Reserve Fund 


0.00 


200,000.00 


0.00 


(56,463.00) 


0.00 


0.00 


143,537.00 


0.00 


0.00 


143,537.00 




576,500.00 


1,100,000.00 


0.00 


(56,463.00) 


(1,063,334.54) 


0.00 


556,702.46 


0.00 


413,165.00 


143,537.46 


FIXED EXPENSES 






















Debt Service - Interest 


0.00 


3,783,972.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(400,000.00) 


3,383,972.00 


3,276,043.98 


0.00 


107.928.02 


Debt Service - Principal 


0.00 


6,968,848.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6,968,848.00 


6,960,000.00 


0.00 


8,848.00 


Stabilization 


0.00 


750,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


750,000.00 


750,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Insurance 


128,868.26 


525,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


653.868.26 


592,105.21 


3,451.13 


58,31 1 .92 


Health Insurance Fund 


0.00 


3,425,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3,425,000.00 


3,425,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


Unemployment Comp 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


RetirementContributory 


0.00 


3,592,193.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


3,592,193.00 


3,575,761.00 


0.00 


16,432.00 




126,868.26 


19,045,013.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(400,000.00) 


18,773.881.26 


18,578,910.19 


3,451.13 


191,519.94 




2,576,312.30 


81,035,276.00 


1,388,807.00 


0.00 


(24,863.97) 


171,319.00 


85,146,850.33 


82,479.160.06 


2,074,993.75 


592,696.52 


SEWER SYSTEM 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


196,510.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6,709.18 


0.00 


203,219.18 


181,231.51 


0.00 


22.005.67 


Other Expenses 


56,850.00 


288,100.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


90,000.00 


434,950.00 


234,113.70 


204,749.32 


(3.913.02) 


GREATER LAW SANITARY 


1,699.86 


1,220.000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,221,699.86 


810,639.50 


175.07 


410,885.29 




58,549.86 


1,704.610.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6,709.18 


90,000.00 


1.859,869.04 


1,225,984.71 


204,924.39 


428.977.94 


WATER DEPARTMENT 






















Personal Services 


0.00 


1,228,148.00 


0.00 


0.00 


18,154.79 


0.00 


1,246.302.79 


1,071,663.93 


70,000.00 


104,638.86 


Other Expenses 


245,087.00 


1,801,900.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


2.046.987.00 


1,335,534.40 


689,053.74 


22,398.86 




245,087.00 


3,030,048.00 


0.00 


0.00 


18,154.79 


0.00 


3,293,289.79 


2,407,198.33 


759,053.74 


127.037 72 




303,636.86 


4,734,658.00 


0.00 


0.00 


24,863.97 


90,000.00 


5.153,158.83 


3,633,183.04 


963,978.13 


556.015.66 


GRAND TOTAL 


2,879,949.16 


85,769,934.00 


1,388,807.00 


0.00 


(0.00) 


261,319.00 


90,300,009.16 


86,112,343.10 


3.038,971.88 


1,148,712.18 



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97 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

JUNE 30, 2000 



FUND/TITLE 



BALANCE 
JULY 1 , 1 999 INTERGOVTAL 



DEPART- 
MENTAL 



TOTAL 
REVENUES 



TOTAL 
EXPEND 



OFS 



OFU 



JUNE 30, 2000 
BALANCE 



CDAG CITY NORTH 
PWED G-9403 



PWED 



CHAPTER 90 



ELECTION OT GRANT 



CAL 99 GOV HIGHWAY SAFETY 

FY97 COMMUNITY POLICING GRANT 

FY96 DARE GRANT 

FY98 COMMUNITY POLICING GRANT 

FY98 DARE GRANT 

BLOCK GRANT 

FY99 DARE GRANT 

FY99 COMMUNITY POLICING GRANT 

FY2000 COMMUNITY POLICING 

JUVENILE ACCOUNTIBILITY BLOCK 

WATCH YOUR CAR 

DISASTER REIMBURSEMENTS 



TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 
HEALTHY COMMUNITY TOBACCO 
RIVER RD JOB 2818 
STRATEGIC PLANNING 
LIBRARY NON-RESIDENT CIRC 
ARTS LIBRARY COUNCIL 
RIGHT TO KNOW 
NATIONAL LEADERSHIP GRANT 
SECONDHAND SMOKE INITIATIVE 
LIBRARY AID CH 78 SEC 19A 
LIBRARY MRLS 



COMM SEPTIC MGMT PROG G 



OFF STREET PARKING 



11,883.10 
0.00 






0.00 
0.00 


0.00 
6,023.08 






11,883.10 
(6,023.08) 


11,883.10 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6,023.08 


0.00 


0.00 


5,860.02 


62,168.27 


2.847.03 




2,847.03 


0.00 . 






65,015.30 


62,168.27 


2,847.03 


0.00 


2,847.03 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


65.015.30 


(107,471.28) 


920,661.92 




920,661 .92 


1,056,633.65 






(243,443.01) 


(107,471.28) 


920,661 .92 


0.00 


920,661 .92 


1,056,633.65 


0.00 


0.00 


(243,443.01) 


4,271.61 




1,992.00 


1,992.00 


2,186.80 






4,076.81 


4,271.61 


0.00 


1,992.00 


1,992.00 


2,186.80 


0.00 


0.00 


4,076.81 



3,745.46 

0.00 

6,487.84 

3,774.84 

(6,583.46) 

3,606.61 

15,000.00 

34,585.23 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

4.08 



60,620.60 



1,913.22 

15,775.32 

37,842.00 

140.00 

5.98 

15,478.65 

973.30 

815.00 

(8,232.98) 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 



14,511.70 

60,000.00 
456.00 
675.00 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

14,511.70 
0.00 

60,000.00 

456.00 

675.00 

0.00 



3,745.46 

0.00 

0.00 

1,065.39 

2,605.12 

0.00 

8,873.67 

9,233.78 

23,726.77 

0.00 

675.00 

0.00 



(10,000.00) 



75,642.70 



0.00 



75,642.70 



49,925.19 



0.00 (10,000.00) 



211,162.13 
35,557.75 



9,858.58 
10,201.84 



8,925.00 
3,300.00 

2,500.00 



211,162.13 

35,557.75 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

8,925.00 

0.00 

3,300.00 

9,858.58 

10,201.84 

2,500.00 

0.00 



93,125.77 

71,054.77 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

524.82 

0.00 

2,960.75 

625.60 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 



(44,702.00) 



0.00 

0.00 

6,487.84 

2,709.45 

(9,188.58) 

3,606.61 

20.638.03 

25,351.45 

26,273.23 

456.00 

0.00 

4.08 



76,338.11 



119,949.58 

(19,721.70) 

37,842.00 

140.00 

5.98 

23,878.83 

973.30 

1,154.25 

1,000.00 

10,201.84 

2,500.00 

(44,702.00) 



64,710.49 


266,780.30 


14,725.00 


281,505.30 


168,291.71 


0.00 


(44,702.00) 


133,222.08 


18,000.00 


2,000.00 




2,000.00 


1 1 ,550.00 






8,450.00 


18,000.00 


2,000.00 


0.00 


2,000.00 


1 1 .550.00 


0.00 


0.00 


8,450.00 


111,882.38 




87,736.32 


87,736.32 


0.00 




(56.858.00) 


142,760.70 


111.882.38 


0.00 


87,736.32 


87,736.32 


0.00 


0.00 


(56,858.00) 


142,760.70 



P&F DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
TOWN DAMAGE RESTITUTION 
DMM FIELDS REVOLVING 
PUBLIC SAFETY DAMAGE REST 
PUBLIC WORKS DAMAGE REST 
LIBRARY DAMAGE RESTITUTION 



SALE OF REAL ESTATE 



SALE OF CEMETERY LOTS 



WETLAND FILING FEES 



C44 S53 DCS REVOLVING 

CH 44 S53 YOUTH SERVICES 

COA CH44 SEC 53E 1/2 

DMM (FIELDS) REVOLVING 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 TITLE V REVG 

CDP CH 44 S53E1/2 TITLE V REVG 



CDP CH44 SEC 53E1/2 



0.00 

5,382.57 

8,405.87 

0.00 

0.00 

15,291.24 



69,774.41 

76.972.68 

8,746.91 

19,657.00 

0.00 

0.00 



13,876.36 


13,876.36 


0.00 


19,783.92 


19,783.92 


1,122.45 


17,118.50 


17,118.50 


17,681.38 


7.759.61 


7,759.61 


6,201 .61 


2.086.34 


2,086.34 


0.00 


14,963.02 


14,963.02 


3,201.85 



177,749.70 
110,538.94 
57,191.81 

19,700.00 
2,868.92 



177,749.70 

110,538.94 

57,191.81 

0.00 

19,700.00 

2,868.92 



168,581.89 
100,056.26 
51,410.35 
0.00 
20,698.97 
5,152.40 



13,876.36 

24,044.04 

7,842.99 

1,558.00 

2,086.34 

27,052.41 



29,079.68 


0.00 


75,587.75 


75,587.75 


28,207.29 


0.00 


0.00 


76,460.14 


18,870.00 






0.00 


0.00 






18,870.00 


18.870.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


18,870.00 


36,253.35 






0.00 


0.00 






36,253.35 


36,253.35 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


36.253.35 


11,632.06 






0.00 


0.00 




(13,000.00) 


(1,367.94) 


11,632.06 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


(13,000.00) 


(1,367.94) 



78,942.22 
87,455.36 
14,528.37 
19,657.00 
(998.97) 
(2.283.48) 



175,151.00 


0.00 


368,049.37 


368,049.37 


345.899.87 


0.00 


0.00 


197,300.50 


28,240.12 




26,780.00 


26,780.00 


12,933.31 






42.086.81 


28,240.12 


0.00 


26,780.00 


26,780.00 


12,933.31 


0.00 


00 


42.086.81 



98 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

JUNE 30, 2000 



FUND/TITLE 



BALANCE 
JULY 1, 1999 



INTERGOV'TAL 



DEPART- 
MENTAL 



TOTAL 
REVENUES 



TOTAL 
EXPEND 



OFS 



OFU 



JUNE 30, 2000 
BALANCE 



FRONTAGE ROAD 
RECYCLABLE BATTERY PROGR 



LOCAL EMERG, PLANNING COM 
ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING 



SEWER RELIEF GRANT 



SHED CONTRIBUTIONS 

GIFT -FIREWORKS 

ART 27, 1995 DISABILITIES 

PHILLIPS ACADEMY GIFT 

OLD TOWN HALL RESTORATION 

TOWN GIFT & DONATIONS 

COMMUNITY GARDEN PROJECT 

CONSERVATION GIFT 

CONSERVATION TRAIL ACCOUNT 

DCS-GIFT 

YOUTH SERVICES GIFTS/CONTRIBUTIONS 

COA BUILDING FUND 

COA SCHOLARSHIPS 

DARE CONTRIBUTIONS 

LIBRARY GIFTS & DONATIONS 

MILLENNUIM CELEBRATION 



PRIVATE CEMETERY FUNDS 



3,855.66 
3,053 84 






0.00 

0.00 


0.00 
0.00 






3.855.66 
3,053.84 


6,909 50 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


6,909.50 


950.00 
300.00 






0.00 
0.00 


0,00 
0.00 






950.00 
300.00 


1.250.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


1,250.00 


14,020.00 






0.00 


14,020.00 






0.00 


14.020.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


14,020.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 



7.263.81 

186.62 

(345.58) 

84,661.45 

468.78 

0.00 

27.38 

4,964.14 

234.85 

812.68 

4,845.00 

(2,882.54) 

150.00 

500.00 

2.650.74 

0.00 





0.00 


0.00 


250.00 


250.00 


0.00 




0.00 


000 


85,891.61 


85,891.61 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 


5,645.00 


5,645.00 


3,218.47 




0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


0.00 




0.00 


(9,436.37) 


77,835.00 


77,835.00 


64,340.24 



7,263.81 

436 62 

(345.58) 

170.553.06 

468.78 

0.00 

27.38 

4.964.14 

234.85 

812.68 

7,271.53 

(2,882.54) 

150.00 

500.00 

12.087.1 1 

13.494.76 



103.537.33 


0.00 


169,621.61 


169.621.61 


58.122.34 


0.00 


0.00 


215.036.60 


47.08 






0.00 


0.00 






47.08 


47.08 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


47.08 



ART 57 1998 ACCUMULATED LEAVE 
A48 1999 ACCUM BENEFIT ACCT 
A39 2000 ACCUMULATED LEAVE 



FY98 FOUNDATION RESERVE 



CEMETERY SALE OF LOTS FUND 



FOOD SERVICES 



ATHLETICS 



SPED ENTITLEMENT 

EARLY CHILDHOOD ALLOCATION 

CURRICULUM FRAMEWORKS 

IEP TRAINING GRANTS 

DRUG FREE SCHOOLS 

TITLE I READING 

To tie to PY Schedule A 

Title VI 

TECH LITERACY 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

PALMS 

TECH TRAINING 

To tie to PY Schedule A 

GIFTED AND TALENTED 

CLASS SIZE REDUCTION 

HEALTH PROTECTION 

DATING VIOLENCE PREVENTION 

SAFE SCHOOLS 

MA PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT 

CORPORATE GRANTS 

LEA REVOLVING 

DRUG ABUSE REVOLVING 

ANDOVER C.A.R.E.S. 

AIRS 

ANDOVER /EISAI SCIENCE 

COLLINS CTR REVOLVING 



19,092.83 

300.000.00 

0.00 



0.00 19.092.83 

0.00 230,405.75 

0.00 0.00 300,000.00 



5,086.84 


343.413.00 




343.413.00 


324,754.28 


764.63 


23,919.00 




23,919.00 


21.023.50 


1,050.00 


24.316.00 




24,316.00 


13,608.88 


0.00 


2,900.00 




2,900.00 


2,982.73 


0.00 


29,822.00 




29,822.00 


29,822.00 


1,655.14 


117,490.00 




117,490.00 


119,145.14 


16,588.45 


(16,588.45) 




(16,588.45) 


0.00 


3,129.56 


18,276.00 




18,276.00 


16,065.59 


5,602.40 


40,000.00 




40,000.00 


36,838.63 


145.00 


19,384.00 




19,384.00 


10,346.82 


50.00 


5,000.00 




5,000.00 


5,050.00 


24,003.48 






0.00 


24,003.48 


9,660.00 


(9.660.00) 




(9,660.00) 


0.00 


379.70 


3.750.00 




3,750.00 


1.662.37 


0.00 


42,235.00 




42,235.00 


30,599.53 


28,134.95 


125,512.00 




125,512.00 


137.865.86 


2.324.00 






0.00 


2,324.00 


0.00 


2,500.00 




2,500.00 


2,500.00 


52.00 






0.00 


52.00 


315.32 


62,965.95 




62,965.95 


2,247.89 


80.421.59 




29,700.00 


29,700.00 


58.323.80 


1,365.54 






0.00 


882.08 


353.36 




2,864.02 


2,864.02 


2,377.74 


16,380.14 




31,102.46 


31,102.46 


26.838.48 


2,945.35 




3.000.00 


3,000.00 


2,907.58 


9,459.44 




58.773.92 


58,773.92 


61.344.60 



0.00 

69.594.25 

300,000.00 



319,092.83 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


249.498.58 


300,000.00 


0.00 


369,594.25 


66,856.48 






0.00 


66,856.48 






0.00 


66,856.48 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


66,856.48 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


117.359.17 




540.00 


540.00 


2,160.00 




(40,000.00) 


75,739.17 


117,359.17 


0.00 


540.00 


540.00 


2,160.00 


0.00 


(40.000.00) 


75,739.17 


51,377.60 


125,084.83 


843,286.71 


968.371.54 


887,814.12 






131.935.02 


51,377.60 


125,084.83 


843,286.71 


968,371.54 


887,814.12 


0.00 


0.00 


131,935.02 


39,418.03 




97,133.03 


97,133.03 


92,871.46 






43,679.60 


39,418.03 


0.00 


97,133.03 


97.133.03 


92,871.46 


0.00 


0.00 


43.679.60 



23.745.56 

3.660.13 

11,757.12 

(82.73) 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

5.339.97 

8.763.77 

9.182.18 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

2.467.33 

11.635.47 

15,781.09 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 

61.033.38 

51.797.79 

483.46 

839.64 

20.644.12 

3,037.77 

6.888.76 



209,866.89 



835,234.50 



125,440.40 



960,674.90 



933,566.98 



0.00 



236.974.81 



99 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 

JUNE 30, 2000 



FUND/TITLE 

EARLY CHILDHOOD REV 
COMMUNITY A.S.K. REVOLVING 
PARENT TO PARENT REVOLVING 
ANDOVER BUDDY CORPS 
FINE ARTS 
PHYS ED REVOLV 
LOST BOOKS 

METROPOLITAN LIFE REVOL 
STUDENT TEACHER REVOLVING 
OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES REV 
ALUMNI REVOLVING 
AND/LAW COLLAB. REV. 



TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE 



MEALS TAX 

TAILINGS - UNCLAIMED CHE 

FISHING LICENSES TO STATE 

POLICE OFF DUTY 

FIRE OFF DUTY 

TOTAL AGENCY FUNDS 



SPECIAL REVENUE & AGENCY FUNDS TOTAL 



BALANCE 




DEPART- 


TOTAL 


TOTAL 






JUNE 30, 2000 


JULY1, 1999 


INTERGOVTAL 


MENTAL 


REVENUES 


EXPEND 


OFS 


OFU 


BALANCE 


9,768.20 




13,580.00 


13,580.00 


7.910.90 






15,437.30 


3.909.77 




1,240.00 


1 ,240.00 


1,222.00 






3.927.77 


10,751.85 




8,045.00 


8,045.00 


10,523.18 






8.273.67 


0.00 






0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


17,703.83 




56,525.45 


56,525.45 


63,486.36 






10,742.92 


4,686.96 




845.00 


845.00 


0.00 






5,531.96 


16,873.57 




13,903.66 


13,903.66 


14.096.60 






16,680.63 


0.00 






0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


9,076.98 






0.00 


0.00 






9,076.98 


92,791.07 




74,443.20 


74.443.20 


77,184.72 






90,049.55 


0.00 






0.00 


0.00 






0.00 


2,113.70 




2.000.00 


2,000.00 


1 ,794.29 






2.319.41 


167,675.93 


0.00 


170,582.31 


170,582.31 


176.218.05 


0.00 


0.00 


162,040.19 


1,622,702.22 


2,228,251.28 


1,981,474.50 


4,209.725.78 


4,162,778.91 


300,000.00 


(164,560.00) 


1,805,089.09 


(0.10) 




856.68 


856.68 


1,425.99 






(569.41) 


0.00 




20,861 .64 


20,861.64 


0.00 






20,861 .64 


(0.50) 




10,227.75 


10,227.75 


10.227.75 






(0.50) 


(66,234.28) 




523,261.25 


523,261.25 


504,729.34 






(47,702.37) 


2.073.67 




27,890.00 


27,890.00 


30,181.88 






(218.21) 


(64,161.21) 


0.00 


583,097.32 


583,097.32 


546,564.96 


0.00 


0.00 


(27,628.85) 


1,558,541.01 


2,228,251.28 


2,564,571.82 


4,792,823.10 


4,709,343.87 


300,000.00 


(164,560.00) 


1,777.460.24 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF LONG TERM DEBT AUTHORIZED 

FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2000 

(REFLECTED TO SHOW DECEMBER 15, 2000 BOND ISSUE) 



ARTICLE PROJECT NAME 

Art 18, 1985 SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS 

Art 26, 1 995 FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

Art 47, 1996 SHAWSHEEN FIELD IMPROVEMENTS 

Art 24, 1997 SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER 

Art 16, 1999 PUBLIC SAFETY CENTER 

Art 1 9, 1 999 MIDD/EL SCHOOL DESIGN 

Art 41 , 1 999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - SO MAIN ST 

Art 42, 1 999 SEWER CONSTRUCTION - ROGERS BROOK 

Art 44, 1 999 LANDFILL CLOSURE 

Art 74, 1999 MAIN STREET STREETSCAPE 

Art 83, 1 999 SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION - SALEM STREET 

Art 6, 2000 MIDDLE/ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Art 1 3, 2000 SEWER CONST- FORREST HILLS 

Art 26, 2000 TOWN/SCHOOL BLDG PROJECTS 

Art 30, 2000 MAIN ST WATER DISTRIBUTION 

Art 32, 2000 LAND ACQ - CONSERVATION 

Art 54, 2000 LINCOLN CIRCLE/LILLIAN TERRACE 

Art 68, 2000 SIDEWALKS - HIGH PLAIN RD 

Art 70, 2000 SIDEWALK - CHESTNUT ST 



AUTHORIZATION 

AMOUNT 

JULY 01, 2000 

1,160,000.00 

384,000.00 

4,000.00 

349,552.00 

10,900,000.00 

2,517,000.00 

22,500,000.00 

4,300,000.00 

2,200,000.00 

304,000.00 

150,000.00 

31,938,000.00 

3,400,000.00 

775,000.00 

910,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

225,000.00 

130,000.00 

300,000.00 



BONDING 



349,552.00 
6,003,448.00 
2,517,000.00 



150,000.00 



225,000.00 
130,000.00 
300,000.00 



AUTHORIZATION 

REMAINING 

DECEMBER 15, 2000 

1,160,000.00 

384,000.00 

4,000.00 

0.00 

4,896,552.00 

0.00 

22,500,000.00 

4,300,000.00 

2,200,000.00 

304,000.00 

0.00 

31,938,000.00 

3,400,000.00 

775,000.00 

910,000.00 

1,500,000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

0.00 



83,946,552.00 



74,271,552.00 



107 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF RESERVE ACCOUNT AND COMPENSATION FUND 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2000 

RESERVE FUND 



Transfers by Authority of the 




Transfers by Vote of Tc 


Finance Committee: 




April, 1999 


General Government 


8,768.00 


From Taxatii 


Community Services 


3,600.00 




Public Safety 


44,095.00 




Carryforward 


143,537.00 
200,000.00 





200,000.00 



200,000.00 



COMPENSATION FUND 



Transfer by Authority of the 
Board of Selectmen: 



Transfers by Vote of the Town Meeting 
April , 1999 



General Government 


28,533.66 


From Taxation 


Community Development 


3.04 


Carryforward 


Community Services 


16.63 




Plant and Facilities 


135,293.95 




Public Safety 


811,237.66 




Public Works 


56,940.23 




Library 


6,445.40 




Sewer Department 


6,709.18 




Water Department 


18,154.79 




Carryforward , 


413,165.00 




Transfer to Surplus 


0.46 
1,476,500.00 





900,000.00 
576,500.00 



1,476,500.00 



108 



SPRING GROVE 

SALE OF CEMETERY LOTS 



UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 



BENEFICIARY PRINCIPAL 

654.796.00 



TRUST-CEMETERY-SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 2000 



BALANCE 



Donations 



Interest 



Total 
Revenue 



Expense 



Total 
OFS(OFU) 



BALANCE 
36,707 00 



707.360.12 


31,320 00 


38.283.83 


69,603.83 




(70.000.00) 


706.963.95 


29.510.74 












29.51074 


736.870.86 


31,320,00 


38.283,83 


69.603.83 




(70.000.00) 


736.474.69 


275,522.72 




24.551,86 


24,551.86 


53.10901 




246,965 57 



EMMA J LINCOLN 
EMILINE LINCOLN 
CONSERVATION FUND 



STABILIZATION 



TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 



A.V.I.S 
AVIS 
CONSERVATION 



697.49 

1,280.75 

41,778.51 



37.67 

69.17 

2.256 10 



37.67 

69.17 

2.256.10 



735,16 

1.349 92 

44.034.61 



43,756 75 


2,362.94 


2.362.94 






46.119 69 


5.655.50 


305.41 


305 41 






5.960 91 


5,655.50 


305.41 


30541 






5.960.91 


1,790,548.30 


41.863.21 


41,863.21 


1.800.000.00 


750,000.00 


782,411.51 


1.790.548.30 


41.863.21 


41.863.21 


1,800.000 00 


750.000.00 


782.411.51 


246.946.04 


15.641.09 


15.641.09 


2.280.35 




260.306.78 


246.946.04 


15.641.09 


15.641.09 


2.280.35 




260.306.78 


3.271.718.49 


95,284.22 1.285,680.39 1.380,964.61 


5.131,97596 


3.425.000.00 


2.945,707 14 









3.271.718.49 


95,284.22 


FARRINGTON 


FLOWERS 


600.00 


1,292.23 


69.78 


BALLARDVALE MEMORIAL 


FLOWERS 


532.88 


1.030.60 


55.64 


ALLEN 


FLOWERS 


200.00 


247.40 


13.36 


DRAPER 


SCHOOL 


1.058.93 


11.089.91 


598.86 


RICHARDSON 


SHAWSHEEN SCHOOL 


1,000.00 


4.232.39 


228.55 


A. & A.V LINCOLN 


SPELLING BEE 


1.0OO.00 


5,784.64 


312.38 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 


FLOWERS 




26,823 99 




RAFTON (INTEREST) 






1.778.87 96.00 98.35 


RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 


SCHOLARSHIP 


598.50 


598.50 




CONROY 


HIGH SCHOOL 


291.71 


1,12010 


60.49 


AMERICAN LEGION 


HIGH SCHOOL 


200 00 


825.96 


44.59 


CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 


SOUTH SCHOOL 


4.187.68 


4.258.43 200.00 225,80 


SMART 


FLOWERS 


1.000.00 


10.05577 


543.01 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


PRINCIPAL 


345.825.50 


345.825.50 




MARGARET G.TOWLE 


INCOME 




160.664.93 


26.489.81 


JOHN CORNELL 


WOOD & COAL 


5,000.00 


43.163.65 


2.330.91 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


WELFARE 


10.000.00 


33,505.79 


1.809.36 


W.L. RAYMOND 


WELFARE 


7.845.81 


35,571.02 


1.920.91 


A.J. LINCOLN 


NEEDY CHILDREN 


5.000.00 


16.790.84 


976.84 


E.I. RAYMOND 


WELFARE/FLOWERS 


1,302.77 


1.816.85 


98.12 


TAYLOR 


FUEL 


300.00 


1,329.68 


71 81 


CD WOOD 


MEMORIAL 




882,819.22 


47.673.82 


TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 






5.531.56 


298.72 


POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 


POLICE 




11.31066 


218.32 


ESTATE S.P. WHITE 


SPRING GROVE 


5.766 63 


11.448 50 


666.06 


HOLT 


SCHOOL 


81.95 


506.48 


27.36 






1.619.42347 296 00 84.832.85 


WORKERS COMP TRUST FUND 










2000 CONTRIBUTION 






212.006.18 


1999 CONTRIBUTION 






95.653.26 




1998 CONTRIBUTION 






73.792.00 




1997 CONTRIBUTION 






32,000.00 




1996 CONTRIBUTION 






71.502.00 





1.380,964.61 5,131,975.! 

69.78 

55.64 

13.36 
598.86 
228.55 
312.38 

194.35 

60.49 

44.59 
425.80 215.! 

543.01 



26.489.81 

2,330.91 

1.809.36 

1,920.91 

976,84 

98.12 

71.81 

47.673.82 

298.72 

218.32 

666.06 

27.36 



1.873.15 
149.85 



85,128.85 



29,656.00 
71,502.00 



UNDISTRIBUTED TRUST FUNDS 



LT VARIANCE TO BE CLEARED 



GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 



1.362 01 

1.08624 

260.76 

11,688.77 

4.460.94 

6.097.02 

26.823.99 

1,973.22 

598.50 

1,180.59 

870.55 

4.468.72 

10.598.78 

345.825.50 

162.681.89 

45,494.56 

33.442.00 

37,342.08 

17,767,68 

1.914.97 

1.401.49 

930.493.04 

5,830.28 

8.858.98 

12.114.56 

533.84 



1.675.170.96 



212.006.18 
95.653.26 
73.792.00 
2.344.00 



272.947.26 


212.006.18 




91.045.90 


212,006.18 
91,045.90 


101.158.00 




383.795.44 
91,045.90 








91.045.90 


91.045.90 






91,045.90 


(1.000,00) 


1,000,00 






1.000.00 








(1.000.00) 


1.000.00 






1.000.00 








8,262.389.39 


244,622.18 


303.125.41 


1.376,726.29 


1.924.473 88 


7.117.904.68 


4,105.000.00 


7.173.958.59 



109 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE.TOWN OF ANDOVER, MA 



MARCH 7, 2000 



DEMOCRATIC 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

AL GORE 

LYNDON H LaROUCHE.JR 

BILL BRADLEY 

NO PREFERENCE 
TOTAL VOTES 



PCT. 1 PCT. 2 PCT. 3 PCT. 4 PCT. 5 PCT. 6 PCT. 7 PCT. 8 SUMMARY 



8 


8 


4 


5 


2 


3 





1 


31 





3 


1 


4 


1 


2 


1 


1 


13 


171 


195 


183 


161 


173 


141 


166 


162 


1352 


3 


2 


2 








2 


1 





10 


214 


183 


177 


191 


189 


196 


155 


183 


1488 


3 


1 


6 


4 


5 


2 


4 


4 


29 


399 


392 


373 


365 


370 


346 


327 


351 


2923 



DEMOCRATIC 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

DAVID M O'BRIEN 
TOTAL VOTES 



153 


130 


151 


133 


141 


124 


120 


135 


1087 


2 


1 


3 





1 








2 


9 


244 


261 


219 


232 


228 


222 


207 


214 


1827 


399 


392 


373 


365 


370 


346 


327 


351 


2923 



DEMOCRATIC 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 
MARY JANE POWELL 
TOTAL VOTES 



121 


117 


108 


114 


136 


104 


103 


104 


907 


2 





2 





1 


2 





1 


8 


276 


275 


263 


251 


233 


240 


224 


246 


2008 


399 


392 


373 


365 


370 


346 


327 


351 


2923 



DEMOCRATIC 
GROUP 

Times counted 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

GROUP 1 



399 


392 


373 


365 


370 


346 


327 


351 


2923 


215 


208 


210 


184 


220 


186 


171 


204 


1598 





























184 


184 


163 


181 


150 


160 


156 


147 


1325 



DEMOCRATIC 

TOWN COMMITTEE (35) 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 

norma villarreal 
mary jane powell 
susan tucker 
barry finegold 
anthony stankiewicz 
nancy stolberg 
michael frishman 
mary stankiewicz 
karen courtney 
john o'brien, jr 
sondra finegold 
mary lyman 
susan jenkins 
alison atwood 
paul stolberg 
mark courtney 
canh tran 
barry michaels 
james cuticchia 
dorothy winn 
david barker 
lawrence morse 
peter McCarthy 
ellen McCarthy 
gale ROSS-RIORDAN 
mark bartner 
carlotta McCarthy 
francis o'connor 
margaret o'connor 
donald miller 
ronald hajj 
mary bausemer 
john hess 
mary middleton 
j germano-cataldo 
total votes 



6638 


6477 


6399 


5888 


6818 


5741 


5338 


6448 


49747 





























219 


205 


193 


201 


189 


183 


203 


174 


1567 


220 


215 


213 


199 


169 


183 


172 


172 


1543 


290 


282 


277 


269 


251 


266 


245 


250 


2130 


271 


276 


265 


251 


245 


258 


236 


230 


2032 


191 


194 


173 


188 


162 


171 


160 


152 


1391 


227 


209 


209 


192 


175 


176 


174 


165 


1527 


223 


213 


196 


208 


198 


202 


188 


178 


1606 


194 


195 


176 


188 


162 


173 


164 


155 


1407 


207 


203 


184 


189 


173 


175 


168 


162 


1461 


230 


223 


216 


210 


183 


202 


195 


198 


1657 


209 


214 


192 


212 


203 


200 


192 


177 


1599 


224 


206 


198 


193 


171 


181 


179 


167 


1519 


227 


222 


192 


209 


196 


200 


197 


189 


1632 


201 


196 


175 


189 


166 


169 


163 


153 


1412 


209 


200 


192 


187 


164 


173 


165 


159 


1449 


205 


194 


179 


186 


161 


169 


158 


154 


1406 


194 


199 


175 


188 


167 


168 


163 


160 


1414 


189 


196 


173 


190 


158 


164 


161 


151 


1382 


200 


211 


191 


200 


175 


176 


165 


164 


1482 


206 


203 


188 


188 


171 


174 


173 


157 


1460 


195 


194 


171 


184 


160 


165 


160 


151 


1380 


187 


190 


172 


186 


162 


167 


162 


156 


1382 


197 


203 


181 


189 


165 


180 


158 


157 


1430 


207 


201 


179 


193 


170 


186 


171 


163 


1470 


195 


191 


183 


184 


162 


168 


158 


154 


1395 


188 


189 


169 


185 


167 


165 


159 


148 


1370 


201 


196 


175 


192 


163 


178 


165 


156 


1426 


198 


213 


179 


188 


159 


175 


167 


158 


1437 


198 


213 


180 


190 


164 


173 


168 


161 


1447 


193 


191 


175 


189 


168 


170 


161 


155 


1402 


198 


207 


194 


189 


169 


171 


168 


158 


1454 


194 


193 


179 


186 


164 


172 


162 


152 


1402 


244 


211 


202 


214 


186 


187 


189 


184 


1617 


197 


195 


180 


195 


169 


174 


165 


157 


1432 


199 


200 


180 


186 


165 


175 


173 


160 


1438 


13965 


13720 


13055 


12775 


12950 


12110 


11445 


12285 


102305 



REPUBLICAN 
PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

ALAN KEYES 

GEORGE W BUSH 

GARY BAUER 

JOHN McCAIN 

STEVE FORBES 

ORRIN HATCH 

NO PREFERENCE 
TOTAL VOTES 



7 


4 


1 


■ 


1 


2 


1 


2 


18 

















1 








1 


10 


19 


9 


8 


13 


12 


18 


16 


105 


130 


203 


151 


197 


213 


178 


161 


219 


1452 

















2 


1 





3 


245 


320 


294 


323 


365 


366 


353 


354 


2620 


2 


3 


2 


4 





1 





1 


13 





























3 


1 


2 


1 


3 


1 


1 





12 


397 


550 


459 


533 


595 


563 


535 


592 


4224 



REPUBUCAN 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

JOHN G WRAGG 
TOTAL VOTES 



166 


210 


177 


198 


243 


218 


215 


259 


1686 





2 


1 





1 


2 


3 


3 


12 


231 


338 


281 


11<B 


351 


343 


317 


330 


2526 


397 


550 


459 


595 


563 


535 


592 


4224 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCETOWN OF ANDOVER, MA 



MARCH 7, 2000 



REPUBLICAN 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
SUSAN L COSTELLO 
RUTH ANNE TEAGUE 
TOTAL VOTES 



PCT. 1 PCT. 2 PCT. 3 PCT. 4 PCT. 5 PCT. 6 PCT. 7 PCT. 8 SUMMARY 



99 


112 


95 


108 


118 


103 


94 


121 


850 








1 








2 





2 


5 


271 


403 


327 


386 


438 


413 


402 


426 


3066 


27 


35 


36 


39 


39 


45 


39 


43 


303 


397 


550 


459 


533 


595 


563 


535 


592 


4224 



REPUBUCAN 
GROUP 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

GROUP 1 

TOTAL VOTES 



217 


301 


244 


265 


345 


288 


287 


306 


2253 





























180 


249 


215 


268 


250 


275 


248 


286 


1971 


397 


550 


459 


533 


595 


563 


535 


592 


4224 



REPUBUCAN 

TOWN COMMITTEE (35) 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 

john wragg 
susan dalton 
joseph dadiego 
charles dalton. jr 
hartley burnham 
charles balboni. jr 
donald ellsworth 
susan costello 
stephen stapinski 
salim tabit 
ronald wackowski 
christine holmes 
gary coon 
john bryden 
john moffitt 
Joanne donnelly 
mark logan 
michael torrisi 
william hickey. jr 
robert dalton 
michael mimno 
annalee abelson 
calvin deyermond 

PHILIP PUCCIA. Ill 

linda bryden 
robert manning 
maria marasco 
kenneth gill 
chester darling 
brian darling 
ronald kearn 
jay costello 
paul twomey 
julie mcdonnell 
john McDonnell 
total votes 



6982 


9830 


7874 


8567 


11283 


9369 


9175 


9899 


72979 





























195 


277 


229 


286 


275 


291 


269 


311 


2133 


223 


312 


267 


319 


319 


332 


300 


353 


2425 


196 


259 


224 


275 


257 


285 


254 


299 


2049 


211 


287 


261 


308 


287 


310 


291 


333 


2286 


190 


261 


222 


269 


257 


280 


258 


308 


2045 


188 


259 


223 


275 


266 


284 


260 


298 


2053 


193 


269 


224 


287 


271 


299 


265 


298 


2106 


213 


300 


264 


326 


306 


324 


330 


338 


2401 


196 


270 


224 


293 


281 


307 


270 


310 


2151 


200 


281 


246 


308 


267 


305 


284 


315 


2206 


190 


257 


225 


277 


257 


282 


258 


301 


2047 


196 


261 


233 


291 


273 


298 


272 


304 


2128 


246 


310 


275 


348 


324 


331 


322 


368 


2524 


190 


263 


225 


284 


266 


312 


272 


296 


2108 


193 


261 


230 


296 


263 


290 


267 


300 


2100 


188 


257 


231 


280 


262 


280 


258 


299 


2055 


186 


255 


220 


272 


260 


279 


257 


295 


2024 


206 


276 


246 


293 


284 


298 


283 


324 


2210 


191 


262 


226 


276 


256 


292 


270 


299 


2072 


203 


273 


240 


287 


268 


292 


271 


320 


2154 


189 


258 


225 


277 


272 


283 


259 


300 


2063 


197 


266 


228 


283 


264 


289 


263 


299 


2089 


203 


275 


246 


295 


269 


302 


278 


309 


2177 


187 


268 


222 


286 


270 


282 


256 


298 


2069 


190 


265 


227 


283 


278 


319 


276 


300 


2138 


194 


266 


237 


277 


260 


288 


267 


303 


2092 


199 


267 


229 


288 


274 


288 


271 


324 


2140 


186 


255 


224 


278 


261 


290 


255 


302 


2051 


193 


269 


230 


278 


261 


283 


273 


306 


2093 


193 


261 


227 


277 


255 


282 


264 


300 


2059 


198 


264 


228 


286 


312 


287 


270 


297 


2142 


189 


264 


234 


279 


270 


295 


284 


302 


2117 


219 


278 


244 


295 


275 


300 


271 


317 


2199 


192 


257 


229 


281 


263 


291 


280 


300 


2093 


190 


257 


226 


275 


259 


286 


272 


295 


2060 


I3895 


19250 


16065 


18655 


20825 


19705 


18725 


20720 


147840 



LIBERTARIAN 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 
Blanks 
Misc Others 
KIP LEE 

HARRY BROWNE 
EDISON P. DANIELS, SR. 
LARRY HINES 
DAVID LYNN HOLUST 
L. NEIL SMITH 
NO PREFERENCE 
TOTAL VOTES 

































2 




















2 











c 

















3 











1 


1 








5 









































































































































3 


2 








1 


1 








7 



LIBERTARIAN 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTAL VOTES 



LIBERTARIAN 

STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN 

Blanks 

Misc Others 

TOTAL VOTES 



LIBERTARIAN 

TOWN COMMITTEE (3) 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

TOTALS 



9 


6 








3 


3 








21 





























9 


6 








3 


3 








21 



111 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
MARCH 28, 2000 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION TOTAL: 2950 
The total number of ballots cast was 2950, viz: 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 5 



418 
277 



Precinct 2 
Precinct 6 



392 
355 



Precinct 3 
Precinct 7 



415 
341 



Precinct 4 
Precinct 8 



370 
382 



Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precinct 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 TOTAL 



MODERATOR (1) 

James D. Doherty 
John Doyle 
All Others 
Blanks 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN (2) 

Brian P. Major 
Donald W. Robb 
Ted E. Teichert 
All Others 
Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (2) 

Frank Eccles 
Gerald F. Gustus 
All Others 
Blanks 



310 
77 
3 
28 



258 
208 
249 


121 



327 
223 

1 
285 



GR LAWRENCE REG VOC TECH SCHOOL 

Joseph Gleason 318 

All Others 

Blanks 100 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY (1) 

Charles K. Erban II 59 

Michael A. Frishman 161 

Francis A. O'Connor 138 

All Others 

Blanks 59 

TRUSTEE PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

Earl G. Efinger 265 

Donna C. Ellsworth 267 

Joan M. Lewis 272 

John R. Petty 252 

Eric Stubenhaus 268 

All Others 

Blanks 766 



292 
75 
1 
24 



242 
214 

217 


111 



283 

231 

3 

267 



296 

96 



48 

113 

188 

1 

43 



242 
247 
241 
232 
228 


770 



321 
70 
1 
23 



222 
258 
215 

1 
134 



306 
250 

2 
272 



312 

2 

101 



82 

135 
154 


43 



257 
254 
265 
253 
261 
2 
783 



271 
76 
1 
22 



262 
210 
179 

89 



272 
227 


241 



274 

96 



75 
107 
123 
2 
63 



223 
222 
227 
204 
224 

1 
749 



72 

3 

14 



194 
145 
138 


77 



202 

176 

2 

174 



208 
2 
67 



55 
106 
82 
1 
34 



175 
188 
179 

167 

175 



501 



256 
77 

1 
21 



238 
154 
204 

114 



244 
209 

4 
253 



263 

92 



49 
144 
113 
1 
49 



208 
222 
209 
214 
215 

3 
704 



249 
64 
2 
26 



244 
166 
187 

1 

84 



256 
217 

1 
208 



252 

89 



40 
124 
120 


56 



210 
212 
217 
208 
225 


633 



289 


2176 


69 


580 





12 


24 


182 


247 


1907 


203 


1558 


189 


1578 


2 


4 


123 


853 


291 


2181 


241 


1774 





13 


232 


1932 


284 


2207 





4 


98 


739 


58 


466 


142 


1032 


129 


1047 





5 


53 


400 


254 


1834 


254 


1866 


253 


1863 


246 


1776 


254 


1850 





6 


649 


5555 



112 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
MAY 23, 2000 



SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION -TOTAL: 4607 

The total number of ballots cast was 4607, viz: 

Precinct 1 451 Precinct 2 601 Precinct 3 487 Precinct 4 642 

Precinct 5 740 Precinct 6 586 Precinct 7 513 Precinct 8 587 

Precinct 1 Precinct 2 Precinct 3 Precinct 4 Precinct 5 Precinct 6 Precinct 7 Precinct 8 TOTAL 

QUESTION 1 

Blanks 322323 3 7 25 

Yes 241 285 238 344 413 274 261 305 2361 

No 207 314 247 295 325 309 249 275 2221 

Total 451 601 487 642 740 586 513 587 4607 

QUESTION 2 

Blanks 4 4 5 1 2 2 18 

Yes 291 335 280 439 503 355 331 370 2904 

No 156 262 202 202 235 229 182 217 1685 

Total 451 601 487 642 740 586 513 587 4607 

QUESTION 3 

Blanks 4 5 3 1 5 4 5 

Yes 216 253 206 335 420 248 235 

No 231 343 278 306 315 334 273 

Total 451 601 487 642 740 586 513 



5 


32 


273 


2186 


309 


2389 


587 


4607 



|QUESTIOn"T1 

Shall the Town of Andover be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts 
required to pay for the bond issued for constructing a Public Safety Center on the existing site at 32 North Main Street and adjacent 
Town-owned parcels, constructing additions and renovations to various Town-owned buildings necessitated thereby and the 
payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto? 

IQUESTION2I 

Shall the Town of Andover be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two and one-half, so-called, the amounts 
required to pay for the bond issued in order to finance a project for constructing, originally equipping and furnishing a new 
elementary and new middle school including outside work and other costs incidental and related thereto and for the construction of a 
new sanitary sewer line from the end of the existing sewer at the Merrimack River near Agilent Technologies to the proposed new 
school site at Cross Street and High Plain Road via a portion of River Road from Launching Road, Forest Hill Drive and a portion of 
Cross Street and High Plain Road, including all other costs incidental and related thereto? 



IQUESTION3I 



Shall the Town of Andover be allowed to exempt from the provisions of propositi on two and one-half, so-called, the amounts 
required to pay for the bond issued in order to finance a project for constructing sidewalks on Cross Street, High Plain Road and 
Forest Hill Drive and any other costs related thereto? 



113 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/19/2000 

PRECINCT 1 PRECINCT 2 PRECINCT 3 PRECINCT 4 PRECINCT 5 PRECINCT 6 PRECINCT 7 PRECINCT 8 TOTALS 
Democratic Party Total 1094 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

EDWARD M KENNEDY 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 

REP. IN CONGRESS 

MARTIN T MEEHAN 

JOSEPH F OSBALDESTON 

THOMAS P TIERNEY 

Blanks 

Misc. Others 

Totals 



152 

39 

2 

193 



133 

7 

43 

10 



193 



149 
25 


174 



120 

9 

38 

7 



174 



123 

39 

1 

163 



106 

6 

40 

11 



163 



91 

37 

4 

132 



77 

8 

40 

5 

2 

132 



64 
23 

1 



55 
11 
19 
2 
1 
88 



73 

31 



104 



75 
5 

21 

3 



104 



71 

12 

3 

86 



68 
2 

13 
2 
1 

86 



120 


843 


32 


238 


2 


13 


154 


1094 


98 


732 


15 


63 


39 


253 


2 


42 





4 


154 


1094 



COUNCILLOR 

PATRICIA A DOWLING 
MARY-ELLEN MANNING 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 



89 

75 

29 



193 



77 

80 

17 



174 



75 

68 

20 



163 



66 

54 

12 



132 



40 

41 

7 





45 

45 

14 



104 



55 

26 

5 



86 



63 


510 


79 


468 


12 


116 









154 



1094 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

SUSAN C TUCKER 158 146 131 97 

Blanks 35 28 32 35 

Misc. Others 

Totals 193 174 163 132 



73 

15 





85 

19 



104 



72 

14 



86 



124 886 

30 208 



154 1094 



REP. IN GENERAL COURT Seventeenth Essex District 

BARRY R FINEGOLD 153 128 119 95 

Blanks 40 44 44 37 

Misc. Others 2 

Totals 193 174 163 132 



78 

26 



104 



69 

17 



86 



120 762 

34 242 

2 

154 1006 



REP. IN GENERAL COURT Eighteenth Middlesex District 



DAVID M NANGLE 














65 











65 


Blanks 














23 











22 


Misc. Others 


























1 


Totals 














88 











88 


CLERK OF COURTS 




















THOMAS H DRISCOLL,JR 


27 


26 


15 


18 


16 


21 


15 


31 


169 


DAVID J HALUNAN 


12 


6 


10 


7 


6 


6 


2 


13 


62 


M PAUL IANNUCCILLO 


42 


48 


50 


38 


22 


34 


18 


39 


291 


BRIAN P LaPIERRE 


1 





1 





3 


2 


1 


1 


9 


JANE LEARY LEVESQUE 


15 


14 


18 


8 


11 


7 


9 


11 


93 


JAMES P MAHONEY 


4 


5 


5 


2 





3 


2 


4 


25 


MICHAEL P MILLER 


59 


58 


47 


43 


22 


20 


27 


41 


317 


Blanks 


33 


17 


17 


16 


8 


11 


12 


14 


128 


Misc. Others 





























Totals 


193 


174 


163 


132 


88 


104 


86 


154 


1094 


REGISTER OF DEEDS 




















THOMAS J BURKE 


147 


149 


124 


89 


64 


73 


62 


116 


824 


Blanks 


46 


25 


39 


43 


24 


31 


24 


38 


270 


Misc. Others 





























Totals 


193 


174 


163 


132 


88 


104 


86 


154 


1094 



114 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/19/2000 

PRECINCT 1 PRECINCT 2 PRECINCT 3 PRECINCT 4 PRECINCT 5 PRECINCT 6 PRECINCT 7 PRECINCT 8 TOTALS 



Republican Party Total 408 ' 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

JACK E ROBINSON HI 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 



64 
8 
1 

73 



26 

11 

3 

40 



40 

14 



54 



45 
8 


53 



34 
8 

2 
44 



36 

10 



46 



29 
6 
5 

40 



46 

12 



58 



320 
77 
11 

408 



REP. IN CONGRESS 

MARC LAPLANTE 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 



11 

62 



73 



12 

26 

2 

40 



11 

42 

1 

54 



21 

32 



53 



15 

29 



44 



16 

29 

1 

46 



16 
23 

1 
40 



11 

47 



58 



113 

290 

5 

408 



COUNCILLOR 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 



73 


40 


54 


53 


40 


44 


40 


51 


395 














4 


2 





7 


13 


73 


40 


54 


53 


44 


46 


40 


58 


408 


73 


40 


53 


52 


43 


44 


40 


53 


400 








1 


1 


1 


2 





5 


8 


73 


40 


54 


53 


44 


46 


40 


58 


408 



REP. IN GENERAL COURT Seventeenth Essex District 

Blanks 73 40 

Misc. Others 

Totals 73 40 

REP. IN GENERAL COURT Eighteenth Middlesex District 
Blanks 

Misc. Others 

Totals 



54 


53 





45 


40 


53 


358 











1 





5 


6 


54 


53 





46 


40 


58 


364 








44 











44 





























44 











44 



CLERK OF COURTS 

JUDITH FLANAGAN KENNEDY 
Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 

REGISTER OF DEEDS 

Blanks 
Misc. Others 
Totals 



3 
70 


73 



73 



73 




40 


40 



40 



40 



4 
47 

3 
54 



53 

1 
54 




50 

3 
53 



53 



53 




42 

2 
44 



44 



44 



2 
43 

1 
46 



46 



46 



5 
33 

2 
40 



40 



40 



2 


16 


49 


374 


7 


18 


58 


408 


58 


407 





1 


58 


408 



115 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR STATE PRIMARY ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 09/19/2000 

PRECINCT 1 PRECINCT 2 PRECINCT 3 PRECINCT 4 PRECINCT 5 PRECINCT 6 PRECINCT 7 PRECINCT 8 TOTALS 



Libertarian Party Total 5 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 






















CARLA HOWELL 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


Blanks 































Misc. Others 































Totals 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


REP. IN CONGRESS 






















Blanks 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


Misc. Others 































Totals 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


COUNCILLOR 






















Blanks 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


Misc. Others 































Totals 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 




















Blanks 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


Misc. Others 































Totals 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT Seventeenth Essex District 
















Blanks 




2 








1 





1 








4 


Misc. Others 































Totals 




2 








1 





1 








4 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 


Eighteenth Middlesex District 
















Blanks 
















1 











1 


Misc. Others 































Totals 
















1 











1 


CLERK OF COURTS 






















Blanks 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


Misc. Others 































Totals 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


REGISTER OF DEEDS 






















Blanks 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 


Misc. Others 































Totals 




2 








1 


1 


1 








5 



116 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR GENERAL ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 11/07/2000 

PCT 1 PCT 2 PCT 3 PCT 4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT 7 PCT 8 TOTALS 



PRESIDENT & VICE-PRESIDENT 



BROWNE & OLIVIER 


9 


16 


10 


13 


21 


11 


9 


8 


97 


BUCHANAN & HIGGINS 


4 


2 


9 


3 


2 


4 


3 


4 


31 


BUSH & CHENEY 


705 


917 


775 


934 


1103 


1035 


868 


986 


7323 


GORE & UEBERMAN 


964 


1062 


962 


999 


1013 


956 


913 


1030 


7899 


HAGEUN& TOMPKINS 





3 


1 


1 


1 


1 








7 


NADER & LaDUKE 


148 


124 


133 


119 


137 


128 


129 


124 


1042 


Blanks 


15 


9 


6 


18 


8 


12 


8 


8 


84 


Misc. Others 


3 


4 


3 


6 


7 


2 


1 


4 


30 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


SENATOR IN CONGRESS 




















EDWARD M KENNEDY 


1187 


1321 


1222 


1290 


1360 


1316 


1175 


1254 


10125 


CARLA A HOWELL 


228 


318 


272 


288 


347 


331 


290 


321 


2395 


JACK E ROBINSON, III 


292 


348 


270 


355 


407 


362 


330 


407 


2771 


DALE E FRIEDGEN 


8 


8 


6 


9 


7 


13 


3 


15 


69 


PHILIP HYDE, III 


4 


4 


8 


9 


5 


3 


8 


5 


46 


PHILIP F LAWLER 


28 


30 


27 


27 


32 


16 


30 


33 


223 


Blanks 


100 


107 


93 


113 


132 


106 


94 


127 


872 


Misc. Others 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


12 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


REP. IN CONGRESS 




















MARTIN T MEEHAN 


1290 


1479 


1358 


1461 


1575 


1475 


1359 


1444 


11441 


Blanks 


523 


617 


515 


599 


691 


630 


560 


682 


4817 


Misc. Others 


35 


41 


26 


33 


26 


44 


12 


38 


255 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


COUNCILLOR 




















MARY-ELLEN MANNING 


1187 


1366 


1260 


1343 


1417 


1360 


1213 


1324 


10470 


Blanks 


646 


758 


630 


737 


865 


771 


718 


819 


5944 


Misc. Others 


15 


13 


9 


13 


10 


18 





21 


99 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 


















SUSAN C TUCKER 


1386 


1582 


1442 


1528 


1605 


1555 


1397 


1557 


12052 


Blanks 


448 


543 


450 


555 


677 


572 


518 


585 


4348 


Misc. Others 


14 


12 


7 


10 


10 


22 


16 


22 


113 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 




















BARRY R FINEGOLD 


1322 


1542 


1402 


1513 





1533 


1370 


1513 


10195 


Blanks 


513 


577 


489 


563 





600 


548 


626 


3916 


Misc. Others 


13 


18 


8 


17 





16 


13 


25 


110 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 




2149 


1931 


2164 


14221 


REP. IN GENERAL COURT 




















DAVID M NANGLE 














1456 











1456 


Blanks 














827 











827 


Misc. Others 














9 











9 


Total Votes 














2292 











2292 


CLERK OF COURTS 




















THOMAS H DRISCOLL,JR 


1101 


1258 


1121 


1246 


1308 


1246 


1126 


1221 


9627 


Blanks 


737 


868 


773 


840 


976 


889 


805 


927 


6815 


Misc. Others 


10 


11 


5 


7 


8 


14 





16 


71 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


REGISTER OF DEEDS 




















THOMAS J BURKE 


1116 


1280 


1161 


1274 


1326 


1276 


1135 


1243 


9811 


Blanks 


722 


845 


732 


811 


956 


860 


787 


906 


6619 


Misc. Others 


10 


12 


6 


8 


10 


13 


9 


15 


83 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


QUESTION 1 




















YES 


1355 


1487 


1348 


1525 


1691 


1546 


1404 


1634 


11990 


NO 


362 


527 


454 


473 


489 


490 


436 


449 


3680 


Blanks 


131 


123 


97 


95 


112 


113 


91 


81 


843 


Total Votes 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 



117 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR GENERAL ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 1 1/07/2000 

PCT1 PCT2 PCT3 PCT 4 PCT 5 PCT 6 PCT7 PCT8 TOTALS 



QUESTION 2 

YES 
NO 

Blanks 
Total Votes 

QUESTION 3 

YES 
NO 

Blanks 
Total Votes 

QUESTION 4 

YES 
NO 

Blanks 
Total Votes 

QUESTION 5 
YES 
NO 

Blanks 
Total Votes 

QUESTION 6 

YES 
NO 

Blanks 
Total Votes 

QUESTION 7 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 
Total Votes 

QUESTION 8 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 
Total Votes 



1019 


1367 


1196 


1388 


1566 


1469 


1278 


1404 


10687 


743 


680 


649 


657 


679 


618 


608 


712 


5346 


86 


90 


54 


48 


47 


62 


45 


48 


480 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


971 


1039 


988 


982 


1108 


1007 


917 


1078 


8090 


793 


1021 


858 


1063 


1133 


1080 


968 


1037 


7953 


84 


77 


53 


48 


51 


62 


46 


49 


470 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


1098 


1397 


1232 


1459 


1693 


1528 


1394 


1490 


11291 


661 


667 


624 


571 


540 


553 


494 


624 


4734 


89 


73 


43 


63 


59 


68 


43 


50 


488 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


750 


871 


798 


828 


872 


820 


809 


825 


6573 


995 


1163 


1034 


1197 


1334 


1227 


1055 


1267 


9272 


103 


103 


67 


68 


86 


102 


67 


72 


668 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


674 


931 


828 


953 


1053 


974 


901 


921 


7235 


1056 


1108 


997 


1074 


1153 


1086 


979 


1180 


8633 


118 


98 


74 


66 


86 


89 


51 


63 


645 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


1373 


1557 


1414 


1664 


1860 


1681 


1572 


1747 


12868 


363 


478 


414 


355 


361 


379 


292 


353 


2995 


112 


102 


71 


74 


71 


89 


67 


64 


650 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 


915 


968 


863 


897 


1042 


872 


936 


978 


7471 


809 


1056 


966 


1126 


1158 


1171 


921 


1102 


8309 


124 


113 


70 


70 


92 


106 


74 


84 


733 


1848 


2137 


1899 


2093 


2292 


2149 


1931 


2164 


16513 



118 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25 & MAY 1, 2, 2000 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 



DESCRIPTION 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



Election Results 

Election Not Required By Ballot 

Salaries/Elected Officials 

Budget -$92,177,495 

Budget Transfers - $400,000 

Supplemental Budget Appropriations - $ 1 7 1 ,3 1 9 

Free Cash -$1,050,000 

Unexpended Appropriations - $25,000 

New Middle School Including Sewer Bonding - 
$31,938,000 

New Sidewalk Construction - Cross St./High Plain 
Bonding - $600,000 

Sewer Easement - Shawsheen Road Special 
Legislation 



ACTION 
TAKEN 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 

Approved 



ATT.GEN 
APPROVAL 



Confirm Acquisition of New School Site Eminent Approved 
Domain 



Sewer Construction - Forest Hill Dr./Cross St. 
Bonding - $3,400,000 



Approved 



Approved 



General Housing Articles 

a. Grant Program Authorization 

b. Road Contracts 

c. Town Report 

d. Property Tax Exemptions Statute Acceptance 

e. Contracts in Excess of Three Years Statute Acceptance 

f. Accepting Easements 

g. Granting Easements 



119 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25 & MAY 1, 2, 2000 



WARRANT 




ACTION 


ATT.GEN 


ART. 


NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


TAKEN 


APPROVAL 


15 




Rescind Bond Authorizations 


Withdrawn 




16 




Revolving Accounts Statute Acceptance 


Approved 




17 




Road/Sidewalk Easements Eminent Domain 


Approved 




18 




Unpaid Bills 


Withdrawn 




19 




Elderly/Disabled Tax Fund Statute Acceptance 


Approved 




20 




Sr. Citizen Tax Voucher Program Statute 
Acceptance 


Approved 





21 Sr. Citizen/Disabled Homeowner Tax Voucher - Approved 
$5,000 

22 Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program - $25,000 Approved 

23 Betterments - Amend Article 41/1999 ATM Withdrawn 

24 Betterments - Amend Article 42/1 999 ATM Withdrawn 

25 Betterments - Amend Article 43/1 999 ATM Withdrawn 

26 Town/School Building Projects Bonding - $775,000 Approved 

27 Town and School Projects - $982,000 Approved 

28 New Ballfields - Essex Sand & Gravel Pit Bonding Defeated 

29 Land Acquisition - Lewis Street & Buxton Court Defeated 
Bonding 

30 Water Main Distribution Improvements Bonding - Approved 
$910,000 

3 1 Bridle Path Pumping Station - $90,000 Approved 

32 Land Acquisition - Conservation Pond Bonding - Approved 
$1,525,000 



120 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25 & MAY 1, 2, 2000 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 


DESCRIPTION 


ACTION ATT.GEN 
TAKEN APPROVAL 


33 


Bancroft School Playgrond 


Defeated 


34 


W. Andover Ballfield - Rec Design/Feasibility 
Study - $50,000 


Approved 


35 


Easement/St. Mary's Church Society 


Approved 


36 


Conservation Acquisition - Brundrett Avenue 
Eminent Domain - $14,250 


Approved 


37 


Post Office Lease - Andover Town House 


Approved 


38 


Sewer Easement - Countryside Way Special 
Legislation 


Approved 


39 


Accumulated Employee Benefit Account - $300,000 Approved 


40 


Indemnify Contributory Retirement Board Members Withdrawn 


41 


3% COLA Andover Retirees - Retirement System 
Statute Acceptance 


Approved 


42 


Gould Road - Out of Sewer 


Approved 


43 


Sewer - Oriole Drive Bonding 


Defeated 


44 


North Reading Water Agreement 


Approved 


45 


Land Transfer to AVIS - Far Corners Section II 
Special Legislation 


Approved 


46 


Alonesos Way - Street Acceptance - $40,000 


Approved 


47 


Farnham Circle - Street Acceptance 


Approved 


48 


Heritage Lane - Street Acceptance 


Approved 


49 


Acorn Drive - Street Acceptance 


Not Laid Out 


50 


Basswood Lane - Street Acceptance 


Not Laid Out 



121 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25 & MAY 1, 2, 2000 



WARRANT ACTION 

ART. NO. DESCRIPTION TAKEN 

5 1 Buttonwood Lane - Street Acceptance Not Laid Out 

52 Hazelwood Circle - Street Acceptance Not Laid Out 

53 Meadow View Lane - Street Acceptance Not Laid Out 

54 Lincoln Circle/Lillion Terrace Bonding - $225,000 Approved 

55 Freemont Lane - Street Acceptance Approved 

56 Pine Cone Lane - Street Acceptance Approved 

57 Sawyers Lane - Street Acceptance Approved 

58 Piper's Glen - Street Acceptance Approved 

59 Stonehedge Road - Discontinue Approved 

60 Jenkins Road - Roadway Eminent Domain Approved 

61 Street Acceptance - General Bylaw Approved 

62 Stevens Street - Roadway Defeated 

63 Conservation Easement - Stevens Street Defeated 

64 Conservation Restriction - Stevens Street Defeated 

65 High Plain Road - Roadway Approved 

66 Sidewalk Restoration Program Approved 
Eminent Domain - $600,000 

67 Sidewalks - Woburn Street Bonding Defeated 

68 Sidewalks -High Plain Road Bonding -$130,000 Approved 

69 Sidewalks - High Street Bonding Defeated 

70 Sidewalks - Chestnut Street Bonding - $300,000 Approved 



ATT.GEN 
APPROVAL 



June 26, 2000 



122 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25 & MAY 1, 2, 2000 



WARRANT 
ART. NO. 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 
85 
86 



DESCRIPTION 



ACTION 
TAKEN 



ATT.GEN 
APPROVAL 



June 26, 2000 
June 26, 2000 
June 26, 2000 
June 26, 2000 



Mass. Brownfields Act Statute Acceptance Approved 

Dracut Power Plant - $ 1 45 ,000 Approved 

Wireless Communication Towers Zoning Bylaw Approved 

Recreation Structure Set Backs Zoning Bylaw Approved 

Slope Requirements Zoning Bylaw Approved 

Exceptions/Special Requirements Zoning Bylaw Approved 

Household Hazardous Waste Recycling Agreement Approved 

Newsracks General Bylaw Withdrawn 

Downtown Parking Needs Study Defeated 

High Plain Road Water Easement Approved 

Ballardvale Community Master Plan $40,000 Approved 

Cluster Zoning Bylaw Defeated 

Multiple Dwelling Design Standard Zoning Amend. Defeated 
Zoning Bylaw 

Flood Hazard District Zoning Bylaw Withdrawn 

Fireworks - $9,000 Approved 

Poker Machine/Gambling Devices General Bylaw Approved June 26, 2000 



123 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25. MAY 1. 2000 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on February 28, 2000 the Inhabitants of said Town who are 
qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the designated polling place. All eight 
precincts: Precincts One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, are to vote at the Field House, Andover High 
School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

TUESDAY, THE TWENTY-EIGHTH DAY OF MARCH, 2000 

at seven o'clock A.M. to eight o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of Andover, have notified the 
Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true 
and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each school house and in no less than five other public places 
where bill and notices are usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Ronald F. Ford 

Constable 

ARTICLE 1. Took up Article One and proceeded to vote Town Offices. The ballot boxes were found to be empty 
and registered 0000. The polls were opened at seven o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock P.M. 

After the final action on the preceding Article One, the said meeting shall stand adjourned by virtue of Chapter 39, 
Section 20 of the Massachusetts General Laws, to April 24, 2000, at 7:00 P.M., at the Field House, Andover High 
School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 24, 2000 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1509 voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:00 P.M. 

The opening prayer was giving by the Moderator. 

Salute to the flag was led by Brian Major, Chairman, Board of Selectmen. 

Mary Ann Iuliucci, a student at Andover High School, sang the song, America, written by Samuel Francis Smith in 
1831 while attending Andover Theological Seminary. 

Upon unanimous consent it was VOTED to admit fifty- three (53) non-voters to the meeting and allow non-voters 
to be escorted to the non-voting section thereafter. 

Selectman Brian Major recognized and presented a plaque a to retiring Selectman, Larry Larsen and Robert 
McQuade, former Director of the Department of Public Works for their service to the Town. 

Tina Girdwood, Chairman of the School Committee, recognized and presented a plaque to retiring School 
Committee member, Timothy McCarron for his service to the Town. 

Don Schroeder, Chairman of the Finance Committee recognized Joanne Marden, Finance Committee member for 
her long time commitment to the publishing of the Finance Committee report. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Gymnasium. 

124 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25. MAY 1. 2000 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading of the 
Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator refer to the 
warrant articles by number and subject matter. 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

The Moderator introduced Charles Dalton, the Town Meeting "Ombudsman" and reminded meeting members that 
he would help them with questions on process and amendments to articles. 

The Moderator outlined the rules and regulations of the meeting to the meeting participants. 

Brian Major, Chairman of the Board of Selectman, presented a status report of previously approved Town projects. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, two members of the School 
Committee for three years, one member of the Andover Housing Authority for five years, five members of the 
Trustees of the Punchard Free School for three years and one member of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical High School District School Committee for three years. 

All the candidates above were voted for on one ballot on March 28, 2000: 
The polls were open from 7:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Town Clerk, Randall L. Hanson, declared the successful candidates to be as follows: 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

Brian P. Major Selectman for Three Years 

Ted E. Teichert Selectman for Three Years 

Frank M Eccles School Committee for Three Years 

Gerald F. Gustus School Committee for Three Years 

Joseph Gleason Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical School Committee for 

Three Years 

Francis A. O'Connor Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

Earl G. Efinger Trustee Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Donna C. Ellsworth Trustee Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Joan M. Lewis Trustee Punchard Free School for Three Years 

John R. Petty Trustee Punchard Free School for Three Years 

Eric Stubenhaus Trustee Punchard Free School for Three Years 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Edward J. Morrissey, 1 89 Andover Street, be elected 
Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year. 



125 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETCN6 - APRIL 24, 25. MAY 1, 2000 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the elected Town 
Officers be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 

Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual Town Meeting. 

Selectmen- Chairman- $1,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 

School Committee - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 
Members- $1,500.00 

The Town Clerk presided over the vote for the Moderators salary. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will raise and appropriate, 
including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and expenses of the Town, including debt and 
interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2000 and ending June 30, 2001 or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

ARTICLE 4 - 2000 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

BUDGET MOTIONS 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,662,478 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 994,086 

Total Appropriated 2,656,564 

The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES Including $13,000 in receipts 1,098,383 

from wetland filing fees 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 132,156 

Total Appropriated 1,230,539 



Upon motion made by the Finance Committee and duly seconded it was moved to amend line 
item 3 to $1,078,383. The Amendment lost by a Majority Vote and the original motion of 
$1,089,383 was approved. 

The original motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 

126 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24 25. MAY 1, 2000 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



Including $194,600 in receipts 
from programs and activities 



473,795 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $296,400 in receipts 
from programs and activities 



Total Appropriated 



351,500 
825,295 



Upon motion made by the Finance Committee and duly seconded, it was moved to amend line 
item 5 to $442,586. The Amendment lost by a Majority vote and the original motion of $473,795 

was approved. 

The original motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



ELDER SERVICES 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $15,000 in federal receipts, $64,500 
in grants and $61,875 in meal donations and 
adult day receipts & newsletter ads 



Total Appropriated 



505,560 
140,172 
645,732 



Upon motion made by the Finance Committee and duly seconded, it was moved to amend line 
item 7 to $468,618. The Amendment lost by a Majority vote and the original motion of $505,560 
was approved. 



The original motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



PLANT AND FACILITIES 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



Including $70,000 in rental receipts, $40,000 from 
sale of cemetery lots and $70,000 from cemetery 
perpetual care interest income 



2,478,929 



10 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $25,000 from perpetual care and 
$85,000 from parking receipts. 



3,649,200 



Total Appropriated 



6,128,129 



127 



ANNUAL TOWN AAEETIN6 - APRIL 24, 25 MAY 1. 2000 

Upon motion by the Finance Committee and duly seconded, it was moved to amend line item 10 to 
$3,649,200. The Amendment was passed by a Majority vote and the amended motion of $3,649,200 
was approved. 

The amended motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



11 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



Including $63,000 from grants, $60,000 from 
police detail fees, $55,299 from parking receipts 
and $520,000 from ambulance collections 



9,573,076 



12 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $8,930 from parking meter revenue 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



PUBLIC WORKS 



13 



14 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



SEWER 



Total Appropriated 



Total Appropriated 



687,735 
10,260,811 



1,350,798 
4,041,325 
5,392,123 



15 



16 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES Including $150,000 from Sewer capital reserves 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



Total Appropriated 



252,575 
1,584,100 
1,836,675 



WATER 



17 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



1,348,269 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $250,000 from Water capital expense 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



Total Appropriated 



128 



1,913,900 
3,262,169 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1. 2000 



LIBRARY 



19 



20 



PERSONAL SERVICES 



OTHER EXPENSES 



Total Appropriated 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



UNCLASSIFIED 



21 



22 



COMPENSATION FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



Total Appropriated 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

23 PERSONAL SERVICES 

24 OTHER EXPENSES 



Including $40,000 in insurance collections for 
student services 



Total Appropriated 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



GREATER LAWRENCE VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



25 



GR LAW ASSESSMENT 



Total Appropriated 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



FIXED 



26 


INTEREST EXPENSE 


27 


BOND REDEMPTION 


28 


STABILIZATION FUND 


29 


GENERAL INSURANCE 


30 


RETIREMENT FUND 


31 


HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 



The motion was APPROVED by Majority vote. 



TOTAL 



TOTAL BUDGET 



1,657,613 

580,998 

2,238,611 



10,000 
200,000 
210,000 



31,936,787 

7,127,098 

39,063,885 



159,847 
159,847 



3,917,924 

6,510,000 

50,000 

549,486 

3,714,705 

3.525.000 

18,267,115 

92,177,495 



129 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 
ARTICLE 4 - 2000 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Finance Committee Report: Approval with amendments 

Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - FREE CASH 



Article 7 Free Cash FY 2001 



1,050,000 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM FREE CASH 



Article 6 Supplemental School FY2000 Budget 
Article 27 Motion 1. Library Space/ Automated Catalogue 

Motion 2. Police Records/Dispatch Computer 
Motion 3. Geographic Information System (GIS) 
Motion 4. Bridge Repair and Reconstruction 
Motion 5. Traffic Signals 
Article 32 Conservation - Maintenance and Improvement 
Article 34 West Andover Ballfield Feasibility Study 
Article 39 Accumulated Employee Benefit Account 
Article 46 Alonesos Way 
Article 72 Dracut Power Plant 
Article 81 Ballardvale Community Master Plan 
Article 85 Fireworks 

TOTAL 



171,319 
185,000 
112,000 
145,000 
400,000 
140,000 

25,000 

50,000 
300,000 

40,000 
145,000 

40,000 

7,000 

1,760,319 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

Transfer from: 
Article 5 Debt Service - Interest 



400,000 



and be appropriated to the following: 
School Department - Other Services 



$400,000 



Article 85 Article 45, 1997 Fireworks 
Article 82, 1998 Fireworks 

and transfer to the following: 
Fireworks 



TOTAL 



1,500 

500 

2,000 

2,000 



130 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25. MAY 1. 2000 
RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 



NONE 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - BORROWING 



Article 9 New Elementary/Middle School Construction (Contingent) 

Article 10 Sidewalk Construction - Cross Street (Contingent) 

Article 13 Sewer Construction - Forest Hill Drive Area 

Article 26 Town/School Building Projects 

Article 30 Water Main Distribution Improvements 

Article 32 Land Acquisition - Conservation Fund 

Article 54 Lincoln Street/Lillian Terrace Street Improvements 

Article 68 Sidewalk - High Plain Road 

Article 70 Sidewalk - Chestnut Street 

TOTAL 



31,938,000 
600,000 

3,400,000 
775,000 
910,000 

1,500,000 

225,000 

130,000 

300,000 

$39,778,000 



UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 



Article 8 Article 24. 1989 Public Safety Needs Analysis 
Article 23, 1998 Tax Voucher Program 



TOTAL 



20,000 

5,000 

25,000 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53 1/2 REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 



Article 16A Community Development and Planning 

Article 16B Health Department - Title V 

Article 16C Health Department - Clinic Supplies 

Article 16D Department of Community Services 

Article 16E Youth Services 

Article 16F Plant and Facilities Field Maintenance 

Article 16G Elder Services 

Article 16H Public Safety 



TOTAL 



25,000 

20,000 

5,000 

200,000 

100,000 

30,000 

100,000 

50,000 

$505,000 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 



Article 21 Elderly/Disabled Homeowner Tax Voucher Program 
Article 22 Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 
Article 66 Sidewalk Restoration Program 



TOTAL 



5,000 

25,000 

600,000 

630,000 



131 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 
SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM STABILIZATION FUND 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SEWER RESERVES 

Article 31 Bridle Path Pumping Station 90,000 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM CONSERVATION FUND 

Article 36 Conservation Acquisition- Brundrett Avenue 14,250 



A true record 
ATTEST 



'''f\d*J&At ^^f+tfrixun^J 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at the April 26, 1999 
Annual Town Meeting as authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 33B, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of $400,000 from Debt 
Service-Interest and appropriate to School Department - Other Expenses for special needs transportation and out of 
district placements. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee: Approval 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to supplement 
appropriations voted at the April 26, 1999 Annual Town Meeting, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of $171,319 from Free 
Cash and appropriate to School Department - Other Expenses for special needs transportation and out of district 
placement. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee: Approval 

132 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25 MAY 1. 2000 

ARTICLE 7. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash to reduce the 
Fiscal Year 2001 tax rate and to effect appropriations voted at the 2000 Annual Town Meeting. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to approve Article 7 in the Amount of 
$1,050,000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 8. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash in the treasury. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the following unexpended 
appropriations be transferred to surplus revenue: 

Article 24, 1 989 Public Safety Needs Analysis $20,000 

Article 23, 1998 Tax Voucher Program $ 5,000 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $31,938,000 for constructing, originally 
equipping and furnishing a new elementary and new middle school including outside work and other costs 
incidental and related thereto; for the construction of a sanitary sewer line from the end of the existing sewer at the 
Merrimack River near Agilent Technologies to the proposed new school site at Cross Street and High Plain Road 
via a portion of River Road from Launching Road, Forest Hill Drive, a portion of Cross Street and High Plain Road, 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain, 
and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized 
to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44 of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, provided that any authorized borrowing hereunder shall be contingent on 
the passage of a vote at a Town Election to exempt the amounts required to pay any authorized bonds or notes from 
the provisions of Proposition 2 Vi in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C (k) and 
(m); sewer betterments are to be assessed by the Board of Selectmen, acting in its capacity as Sewer 
Commissioners, based upon the uniform unit method or the uniform rate method or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriates the sum of $31,938,000 for 
constructing, originally equipping and furnishing a new elementary and new middle school including outside work 
and other costs incidental and related thereto; for the construction of a sanitary sewer line from the end of the 
existing sewer at the Merrimack River near Agilent Technologies to the proposed new school site at Cross Street 
and High Plain Road via a portion of River Road from Launching Road, Forest Hill Drive, a portion of Cross Street 
and High Plain Road; that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to acquire any necessary easements by gift, 
purchase or eminent domain, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7(3) and 7(1) of the 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, provided that any 
authorized borrowing hereunder shall be contingent on the passage of a vote at a Town Election to exempt the 
amounts required to pay any authorized bonds or notes from the provisions of Proposition 2Vz in accordance with 

133 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C(k) and (m); and that sewer betterments are to be assessed by 
the Board of Selectmen, acting in its capacity as Sewer Commissioners, based upon the uniform unit method. 

VOTE: YES: 1266 NO: 13 A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee: Approval 

Board of Health Approval 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $600,000 for the purpose of constructing or 
reconstructing sidewalks on Cross Street, High Plain Road and Forest Hill Drive and any other costs incidental and 
related thereto and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or 
eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(6) of the General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town provided that any authorized borrowing hereunder shall be 
contingent on the passage of a vote at a Town Election to exempt the amounts required to pay any authorized bonds 
or notes from the provisions of Proposition 2Vi in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, 
Section 21C (k) and (m),or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $600,000 for the 
purpose of constructing sidewalks on Cross Street, High Plain Road and Forest Hill Drive and for the payment of 
any other costs incidental and related thereto; and that the Board of Selectmen are hereby authorized to acquire any 
necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authonzed to borrow under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(6) of the 
General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, provided that any 
authorized borrowing hereunder shall be contingent on the passage of a vote at a Town Election to exempt the 
amounts required to pay any authorized bonds or notes from the provisions of Proposition 2 1 /2 in accordance with 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 21C(k) and (m). 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept an easement for sewer 
purposes on land owned by the Andover Village Improvement Society as shown on Assessors Map 188, Lot 6; and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen and School Committee to grant and convey to the Andover Village 
Improvement Society a pedestrian easement for the purposes of preserving and maintaining the existing trail and 
ensuring continued public access on land approximately 125 feet in width along the westerly lot line of property at 
the Andover High School as shown on Assessors Map 72, Lot 54 from Shawsheen Road to other property owned 
by the Andover Village Improvement Society as shown on Assessors Map 73, Lot 12; or to transfer the care, 
custody and control of said land approximately 125 feet in width along the westerly lot line of property at the 
Andover High School as shown on Assessors Map 72, Lot 54 from Shawsheen Road to other property owned by the 
Andover Village Improvement Society as shown on Assessors Map 73, Lot 12 to the Board of Selectmen for 
purposes of conveyance of said land to the Andover Village Improvement Society, and to authorize said 
conveyance, with all of the foregoing for no monetary consideration, and on terms and conditions deemed by the 
Board of Selectmen and School Committee to be in the best interests of the Town, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation to accomplish the foregoing, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

134 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2000 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
accept an easement for sewer purposes on land owned by the Andover Village Improvement Society as shown on 
Assessors Map 188, Lot 6; and to transfer the care, custody and control of land approximately 125 feet in width 
along the westerly lot line of property at the Andover High School as shown on Assessors Map 72, Lot 54 from 
Shawsheen Road to other properly owned by the Andover Village Improvement Society as shown on Assessors 
Map 73, Lot 12 to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of conveyance of said land to the Andover Village 
Improvement Society, and to authorize said conveyance, with all of the foregoing for no monetary consideration, 
and on terms and conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen and School Committee to be in the best interests of 
the Town, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation to 
accomplish the foregoing, or take any other action related thereto. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote, as a confirmatory acquisition, to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain a parcel of undeveloped land, for school purposes, on the 
easterly side of the intersection of Cross Street and High Plain Road in Andover, Essex County, Massachusetts, 
containing 37 acres, more or less, and shown on a plan recorded as Plan Number 9986 at the Essex County North 
District Registry of Deeds and entitled "PLAN OF LAND IN ANDOVER, MA OWNED BY INHABITANTS OF 
TOWN OF ANDOVER", by John Avery, Jr., Town Engineer, dated February 27, 1985, and on file at the Town 
Clerk's Office, and to award no payment or damages for said acquisition or taking; said premises are subject to an 
easement granted by Fannie W. Burnham and Francis L. Burnham to New England Power Construction C ompany 
dated July 7, 1928, recorded in the Essex County North Registry of Deeds in Book 541 at Page 123, which 
easement shall not be taken or acquired; or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Town Counsel 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 12 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by Moderator A 2/3 vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $3,400,000 for the construction of sanitary 
sewer lines, including costs incidental and related thereto, in the following streets: Launching Road, Mercury Circle, 
Apollo Circle, Gemini Circle, Forest Hill Drive, Aspen Circle, Bittersweet Lane, Wintergreen Circle, Deerbury 
Circle, Brierwood Circle, Sandalwood Lane, Pepperidge Circle, Alpine Drive, Sugarbush Lane, Brady Loop, 
Monahan Lane, Cross Street, High Plain Road and Mulberry Circle and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor; sewer betterments are to be assessed by the Board of Selectmen, acting in its capacity as Sewer 
Commissioners, based upon the uniform unit method or the uniform rate method, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

135 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that he Town hereby appropriates the sum of $3,400,000 for 
the construction of sanitary sewer lines, including costs incidental and related thereto, in the following streets: 
Launching Road, Mercury Circle, Apollo Circle, Gemini Circle, Forest Hill Drive, Aspen Circle, Bittersweet Lane, 
Wintergreen Circle, Deerberry Circle, Brierwood Circle, Sandalwood Lane, Pepperidge Circle, Alpine Drive, 
Sugarbush Lane, Brady Loop, Monahan Lane, Cross Street, High Plain Road and Mulberry Circle; that the Board of 
Selectmen is hereby authorized to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to 
raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow 
said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; and that sewer betterments are to be assessed by the Board of 
Selectmen, acting in its capacity as Sewer Commissioners, based upon the uniform unit method. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

School Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Health Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:14 P.M., until Tuesday, April 25, 2000 at 
7:00 P. M. at the Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 25, 2000 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 624 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James Doherty, Moderator, at 7:03 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit twenty-five (25) non-voters to the meeting and to escort non-voters to 
the non-voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading of the 
Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

The Moderator introduced Charles Dalton, the Town Meeting "Ombudsman" and reminded meeting members that 
he would help them with questions on process and amendments to articles. 

The Moderator outlined the rules and regulations of the meeting to the meeting participants. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote the following consent articles or take any other action related thereto: 
14A. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to apply for, 
accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds allotted to Andover by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government under any State or Federal grant program. 

136 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25 MAY 1. 2000 

On request of the Town Manager 

14B. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract with the Massachusetts 
Highway Department Commissioners or the County Commissioners or the Federal Government for the construction 
and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year. 

On request of the Town Manager 

14C. To act upon the report of the Town officers. 

On request of the Town Manager 

14D. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986 as amended 
by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax exemption for Fiscal Year 2001 for those 
persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5 or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

14E. To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 30B, 
Section 1 2(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of Schools to solicit and award contracts for 
terms exceeding three years, including any renewal, extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term 
is determined to be in the best interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or the School Committee, as 
appropriate, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

14F. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to accept grants 
of easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee 
deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

14G. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School Committee to grant 
easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee 
deem in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Articles 14 A, 14B, 14C, 14 D, 14E, 14F, 14G was approved as printed in the 
Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior Town Meetings or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 15 was WITHDRAWN. 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



137 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25 MAY 1. 2000 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following revolving funds for certain Town 
departments under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53EV2 for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 
2000, or take any other action related thereto: 



Revolving Fund 


Authorized to 
Spend 


Use of Fund 


Revenue Source 


FY-2001 Limit 


A. Community 


Division Heads 


Advertising legal 


Applicant Fees 


$25,000 


Development & 




hearing notice 






Planning Department 




expenses for permit 
applications 






B. Title V - Health 


Public Health 


Inspections and 


Title V upgrade 


$20,000 


Division 


Director 


testing associated 
with Title V septic 
system regulations 


permit fee 




C. Health Clinic 


Public Health 


Clinic supplies and 


Clinic participant 


$5,000 




Director 


other expenses 


fees 




D. Division of 


Community Services 


Trips, ticket sales and 


Participant fees 


$200,000 


Community Services 


Director 


special programs and 
activities 






E. Division of Youth 


Youth Services 


All programs and 


Participant fees 


$100,000 


Services 


Director 


activities expenses, 
part-time help 






F. Field Maintenance 


Plant and Facilities 
Director 


Field maintenance, 
upgrade and related 
expenses 


Field rental fees 


$30,000 


G. Division of Elder 


Elder Services 


Senior programs, 


Participant fees 


$100,000 


Services 


Director 


classes and activities 






H. Public Safety 


Chief of Police 


Maintenance and 
purchase of public 
safety radio and 
antennae equipment 


Lease agreements for 
antenna users 


$50,000 



On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 16 A, 16B, 16C, 16D, 16E, 16F, 16G, 16H was approved as printed in 
the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval (Will monitor police account for budget issues) 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary easements by gift, by 
purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway Construction or any other federal or state aid 
program for road or sidewalk improvements. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 17 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills for 
which obligation was incurred in prior Fiscal Years. 

138 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 18 was WITHDRAWN by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 166 of the Acts of 1998 to allow a 
voluntary contribution to establish a Town aid to the elderly and disabled taxation fund, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that the Town accept the provisions of 
Chapter 166 of the Acts of 1998 amending Chapter 60, Section 3D, to allow a voluntary contribution to establish a 
Town aid to the elderly and disabled taxation fund. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 59, Section 5K to establish a 
program to allow persons over the age of 60 to volunteer to provide services to the Town to reduce their real 
property tax obligation, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 20 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote 
effective with the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2000. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and/or transfer from available funds, the sum of 
$75,000 for the purpose of providing senior citizens and disabled homeowners with a real estate tax payment 
voucher program as formulated by the Council on Aging and approved by the Town Manager or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 21 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $5000 
from Taxation by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation a sum not to exceed $25,000 for 
the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled transportation subsidy program or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 22 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $25,000 
from Taxation by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

139 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote on Article 41 of the 1999 Annual Town Meeting in 
April, 1999, by adding the following: "Betterments shall be assessed according to the Uniform Unit Method" or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 23 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote on Article 42 of the 1999 Annual Town Meeting in 
April, 1999, by adding the following: "Betterments shall be assessed according to the Uniform Unit Method" or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 24 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the vote on Article 43 of the 1999 Annual Town Meeting in 
April, 1999, by adding the following: "Betterments shall be assessed according to the Uniform Unit Method" or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 25 by a Majority vote 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,475,000 for the purpose of remodeling, 
reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to public buildings, including the payment of all costs incidental and 
related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, clause 3(A) of the General 
Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriates the sum of $775,000 for the 
purpose of remodeling, reconstructing or making extraordinary repairs to public buildings, including the payment of 
all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause 
(3 A) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $1,000,000 
for the following purposes: Library Space and Automated Catalogue Upgrades, Police Records and Dispatch 
Computer Upgrade, Geographic Information System, Bridge Repair and Reconstruction, Shawsheen Footbridge and 
Traffic Signals or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 27 was approved by a Majority vote as printed in the Warrant for a 
total amount of $982,000 from available funds in the following motions: 

140 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25. MAY 1. 2000 



» SB ' 



Motion 1. That the Town appropriates the sum of 185,000 from available funds for library space and automated 
catalogue upgrades. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $185,000 from available funds. 

Motion 2. That the Town appropriates the sum of $ 1 12,000 from available funds for Police Records and Dispatch 
Computer Upgrade. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $112,000 from available funds. 

Motion 3. That the Town appropriates the sum of $145,000 from available funds for Geographic Information 
Systems. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $145,000 from available funds. 

Motion 4. That the Town appropriates the sum of $400,000 from available funds for Bridge Repair and 
Reconstruction. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $400,000 from available funds. 

Motion 5. That the Town appropriates the sum of $18,000 from available funds for a Shawsheen River Footbridge 
Study. 

Disapproved by a Majority vote 

Motion 6. That the Town appropriates the sum of $140,000 from available funds for traffic signals. 

Approved by a Majority vote in the amount of $140,000 from available funds. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval of motions 1, 2, 3,4, 6 - Disapproval of Motion 5 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,100,000 for the purpose of constructing 
recreational fields at the so-called Essex Sand and Gravel Pit including any related development of land and other 
costs incidental and related thereto and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by 
gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(25) of the General 
Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriates the sum of $1,100,000 for 
the purpose of constructing recreational fields at the so-called Essex Sand and Gravel Pit including any related 
development of land and other costs incidental and related thereto; that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized 
to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation, the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to 

Chapter 44, Section 7(25) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor. 

A motion was made to close debate. The moderator declared that the motion was carried by a 2/3. There was no 

objection. 
J 141 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

Article 28 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Approval 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,000,000 for the purpose of acquiring, for 
expansion of public works facilities or any other purpose for which the Town is authorized to acquire land or 
interests in land, including buildings thereon, as follows: 

Assessors Map # Parcel Address Sq. Ft. +/- 

38 15 7 Lewis Street 5,000 

38 16 4 Buxton Court 4,700 

38 20 1 1 Buxton Court 9,900 

and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said land and buildings by gift, purchase or eminent domain and 
that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow 
said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriates the sum of $ 1 ,000,000 for 
the purpose of acquiring, for expansion of public works facilities or any other purpose for which the Town is 
authorized to acquire land or interests in land, including buildings thereon, as follows: 

Assessors Map # Parcel Address Sq. Ft. +/- 

38 15 7 Lewis Street 5,000 

38 16 4 Buxton Court 4,700 

38 20 11 Buxton Court 9,900 

That the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to acquire said land and buildings by gift, purchase or eminent 
domain and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized 
to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General Laws, or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 29 was DEFEATED 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $910,000 for the purpose of laying and re- 
laying water mains of not less than six inches but less than sixteen inches in diameter and for costs incidental and 
related thereto and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or 
eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 

142 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8(5) of the General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriates the sum of $910,000 for 
the purpose of laying and re-laying water mains of not less than six inches but less than sixteen inches in diameter 
and for costs incidental and related thereto; that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to acquire any 
necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain and that to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
8(5) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from Sewer Reserves and appropriate the sum of $90,000 
for the purpose of replacing the Bridle Path Sewer Pumping Station including costs incidental thereto or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 3 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $90,000 
from sewer reserves by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $1,500,000 for the acquisition of land for 
conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission to acquire this land by gift, purchase or eminent 
domain , and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor and to appropriate and raise by transfer from 
available funds the sum of $25,000 from the Conservation Fund to be used for the maintenance and improvement of 
land acquired for conservation purposes or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriates the sum of $1,500,000 for 
the acquisition of land for conservation purposes under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the 
Massachusetts General Laws; that the Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission are hereby authorized to 
acquire this land by gift, purchase or eminent domain, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
7(3) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor and that, 
further, the additional sum of $25,000 is hereby appropriated by transfer from available funds from the 
Conservation Fund to be used for the maintenance and improvement of any land acquired pursuant to this vote. 



143 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission Approval 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or 
by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $80,000 to replace the Bancroft School playground 
called the Dragon's Lair. 

On petition of Pat D'Ambra and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to appropriate from free cash the sum of 
$40,000 to replace the Bancroft School Playground called the Dragon's Lair. 

Article 33 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $50,000 for 
a preliminary design and feasibility study for the construction of outdoor recreation areas and ballfields at the 
triangle of land behind the West Andover Fire Station bordered by Greenwood Road, Chandler Road and Ledge 
Road and the Town landfill off Ledge Road or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 34 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $50,000 
from free cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to grant a temporary construction and grading easement to St. Mary's 
Church Society, Inc. and the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Boston, 30 feet in width along the westerly side of the 
Olde Andover Village parking lot on Main Street, upon terms and conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen to 
be in the best interests of the Town or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of John D. O'Brien, Jr. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 35 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire by gift, purchase or eminent domain 
property at 44 Brundrett Avenue as shown on Town Map 188, Town Lot 9A, Subdivision Lot A for conservation 
purposes to be held under the control of the Conservation Commission pursuant to the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, for the amount of $14,250 to be paid from the Conservation Fund, or take 
any other action related thereto. 



144 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 36 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $14, 250 
from the Conservation Fund. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to renew the lease of space in the 
Andover Town House, 20 Main Street, to the United States Postal Service for a term not to exceed 30 years, under 
such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen deem to be in the best interest of the Town or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 37 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to change the use of the land under the control of the Conservation 
Commission shown on Assessors Map 82, Lot 5, near Countryside Way, to allow the Conservation Commission to 
grant a sewer easement approximately 70 feet in length and approximately 20 feet wide to the Town under the 
control of the Board of Selectmen for the purpose of installing a sewer line within the easement and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to accept said easement and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court 
for special legislation to accomplish the foregoing or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 38 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared More Than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriate 
a sum not to exceed $300,000 to the Accumulated Employee Benefit Account for funding accrued employee 
vacation and sick leave liabilities payable upon retirement or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 39 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $300,000 
from free cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

145 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 32, 
Section 20 A, which will indemnify the Board members of the Andover Contributory Retirement System against 
civil actions brought against the Board or members of the Board or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Andover Contributory Retirement Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 40 was WTHDRAWN by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept the amendment to Section 103 of Chapter 32 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws as contained in Chapter 127 of the FY2000 State Budget making it possible to 
authorize the Andover Retirement Board to pay a 3% cost of living allowance annually to retirees of the Andover 
Contributory Retirement System or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Andover Contributory Retirement Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 41 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: No Position 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 41 of the 1999 Town Meeting to remove Gould Road 
from the list of streets to be serviced by the proposed sewer system. 

On petition of Justin W. Burley and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 42 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to adjourn at 10:15 P.M., until Monday May 1, 2000 at 
7:00 P. M. at the Collins Center, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MAY 1. 2000 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 498 voters were admitted to the meeting. 

James Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:03 P.M. 

By unanimous consent it was voted to admit twenty-two (22) non- voters to the meeting and to escort non-voters to 
the non- voter section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Gymnasium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with the reading of the 
Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the warrant articles by number and subject matter 

The voting sections of the hall were laid out by the Moderator for the counters and voters. 

146 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25. MAY 1, 2000 

The Moderator introduced Charles Dalton, the Town Meeting "Ombudsman" and reminded meeting members that 
he would help them with questions on process and amendments to articles. 

The Moderator outlined the rules and regulations of the meeting to the meeting participant 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or 
any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate a sum approximately $125,000 for the cost of constructing a 
sanitary sewer in Oriole Drive from house #18 to serve house #25 and to authorize the Town to acquire the 
necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain. Betterments are to be assessed. 

On petition of Edward Kaplan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriates $125,000 for the cost of 
constructing a sanitary sewer in Oriole Drive from house #18 to serve ho se #25; that to meet this appropriation the 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is hereby authonzed to borrow said sum under and pursuant 
to Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the 
Town therefor, and that the sewer betterments are to be assessed by the Board of Selectmen, acting in its capacity as 
sewer commissioners, based on the uniform unit method, and that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to 
acquire the necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by eminent domain. 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sign an amendment to the 
Intermunicipal Agreement between the Town and the Town of North Reading for Potable Water Service to increase 
the additional maximum amount delivered to North Reading pursuant to the Agreement from 1.5 million gallons per 
day to no more than 1.568 million gallons per day or take any other action related thereto. 

On behalf of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 44 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to transfer custody and control of the parcels of land identified as open 
space and shown as Parcels "A", "B", "C", "D" and "E" on a Plan of Land entitled, "Definitive Plan of Far Corners 
Section 2, Scale: 1" = 40'; August 20, 1982, Owner and Developer, Corinna Construction Corp.; Engineers: Dana F. 
Perkins & Assoc, Inc.", which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 8991, 
containing a total of approximately 19.16 acres according to said plan, to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of 
conveying said land to the Andover Village Improvement Society and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
convey said land to the Andover Village Improvement Society for no monetary consideration and to authorize the 

Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for special legislation to accomplish the foregoing or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 45 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

147 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25 MAY 1. 2000 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name Alonesos Way as a public way and authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase, otherwise any fee, easement or other interest in 
land known as Alonesos Way as shown on a plan entitled "Lovejoy Estates, Andover, Mass.", owner: George 
Chongris, prepared by Nysten Engineering Associates, scale: 1" = 40', dated May 1977, revised July 18, 1977, said 
plan being recorded in the North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 7651 on August 19, 1977, and on file in 
the Office of the Town Clerk, and as constructed, and to award no damages for said taking or payment for said 
acquisition, and to appropriate and raise by taxation, transfer from available funds or borrowing or any combination 
thereof a sum of $40,000 for required engineering services, legal services, repairs and improvements to Alonesos 
Way and expenses incidental thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Philip Shea and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 46 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $40,000 
from Free Cash. 

VOTE: Declared more than 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will approve the actions of the Board of Selectmen in laying out as a public way 
under provisions of Chapter 82, Section 21 of the Massachusetts General Laws designated as Farnham Circle and 
approve the Drainage Easements and Surface and Ground Water Drain Easement as shown on the plans provided. 
Copies of the following plans have been filed with the Town Clerk as required under Section 23 of Chapter 82: 
"Street Acceptance Plan of Land in 'Farnham Estates' Andover, Massachusetts, scale 1" = 40', dated December 15, 
1998 by Dana F. Perkins, Inc.". 

On petition of George Morey and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 47 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 48. To petition the Town Meeting to accept as a public way Heritage Lane as shown on a plan entitled 
"Definitive Plan of Heritage Estates, Andover, Mass., Owner: Sidney P. White; Developer: Andover building and 
Development Corp.; Engineer: Nysten Engineering & Associates, Andover, Mass.; dated March 23, 1981, revised 
April 23, 1981; Scale 1" = 40'; recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 8635. 
On petition of Andover Building and Development Corporation and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 48 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

148 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25. MAY 1. 2000 

ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Acorn Drive, as shown on a plan 
approved by the Andover Planning Board, on a Plan entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' 
Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', Date: January 15, 1991, Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 
Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass., Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", which 
plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Basswood Lane, as shown on a 
plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, on a Plan entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone 
Meadows' Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', Date: January 15, 1991, Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development 
Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass., Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, 
Mass.", which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Button wood Drive, as shown on 
a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, on a Plan entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone 
Meadows' Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', Date: January 15, 1991, Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development 
Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass., Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, 
Mass.", which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Hazehvood Circle, as shown on a 
plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, on a Plan entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone 
Meadows' Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', Date: January 15, 1991, Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development 
Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, Andover, Mass., Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, 
Mass.", which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Meadow View Lane, as shown 
on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled , "Definitive Plan Meadow View 
Andover, MA, Applicant, Yvon Cormier c/o Yvon Cormier Construction Co., Inc., 59 Chandler Circle, Andover, 
MA 01810, W.C. Cammett Engineering, Inc., 297 Elm Street, Amesbury, MA, Date 3/2/94, Scale: 1" = 40', which 
plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12415. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others 

NOT LAID OUT 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to accept Lincoln Circle East, Lincoln Circle West and Lillian 

149 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

Terrace as public ways and authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, gift, purchase, 
otherwise any fee, easement or other interest in land known as Lincoln Circle East, Lincoln Circle West and Lillian 
Terrace as shown on a plan entitled "Relocation of Lot Lines Subdivision and Acceptance Plan. Portion of Lincoln 
Circle, Andover, October, 1958" owned by Lillian Cussell and drawn by V.J. Marino Engineering Company and 
recorded in the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan 3742 and on file in the Office of the Town Clerk, and as 
constructed, and to award no damages for said taking or payment for said acquisition, and to appropriate and raise 
by taxation, transfer from available funds or borrowing or any combination thereof a sum of $225,000.00 for 
required engineering services, legal services, repairs and improvements to Lincoln Circle East, Lincoln Circle West 
and Lillian Terrace and expenses incidental thereto, or take any action related thereto. 

On petition of Stuart M. Holber and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby accepts Lincoln Circle East, Lincoln 
Circle West and Lillian Terrace as public ways and authorizes the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent 
domain, gift, purchase, or otherwise any fee, easement or other interest in land known as Lincoln Circle East, 
Lincoln Circle West and Lillian Terrace as shown on a plan entitled "Relocation of Lot Lines Subdivision and 
Acceptance Plan. Portion of Lincoln Circle, Andover, October, 1958" owned by Lillian Cussell and drawn by V.J. 
Marino Engineering Company and recorded in the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan 3742 and on file in the 
Office of the Town Clerk, and as constructed, and to award no damages for said taking or payment for said 
acquisition, and to appropriate $225,000 for all expenses incidental and related to this vote and to meet this 
appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow said 
amount under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town therefore. 

VOTE: Declared More than a 2/3 Vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 55. To petition the Town Meeting to accept, as a public way, Freemont Lane, as shown on a Plan 
entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan of Land Quailcrest Section II, Andover, Massachusetts", Scale 1" = 40', Date: 
July 30, 1996, Revised: 9/1 1/96, 1 1/07/96 and 1 1/26/96, Drawn by Dana F. Perkins, Inc., Consulting Engineers & 
Land Surveyors, 1215 Main Street, Unit 111, Tewksbury, Massachusetts 01876, Prepared for: F. & I.D. Associates, 
10 Boutwell Road, Andover, Massachusetts, Recorded at Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 13047. 

On petition of Linda A. O'Connell, Esq. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 55 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Pine Cone Lane, as shown on a 
plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a plan of land entitled "Definitive Subdivision Plan 
'Pine Cone Lane', Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', Date: March 28, 1989, Owner & applicant: Philip E. and Marsha 
Froburg, Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc.", which plan is recorded in Essex North District Registry of Deeds as 
Plan #11589. 



150 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

On petition of James W. Mangano, Trustee of Mitsu Realty Trust and others 
Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 56 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will approve the actions of the Board of Selectmen in laying out as a public way 
under provisions of Chapter 82, Section 21 of the Massachusetts General Laws designated as Sawyers Lane and 
approve the Drainage Easements and Water Easements as shown on the plans provided. Copies of the following 
plans have been filed with the Town Clerk as required under Section 23 of Chapter 82: "Street Acceptance As-built 
Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts, Deering Estates, Scale 1" = 40', Date: October 22, 1999". 

On petition of James V. Carroll and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 57 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will approve the actions of the Board of Selectmen in laying out as a public way 
under provisions of Chapter 82, Section 21 of the Massachusetts General Laws designated as Piper's Glen and 
approve the Drainage Easements and Water Easements as shown on the plans provided. Copies of the following 
plans have been filed with the Town Clerk as required under Section 23 of Chapter 82: "Street Acceptance As-built 
Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts, Deering Estates, Scale 1" = 40', Date: October 22, 1999". 

On petition of James V. Carroll and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 58 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue an existing public way, Stonehedge Road, as accepted 
at Annual Town Meeting, March 8, 1926, Page 313 of the Annual Town Meeting Records; said Stonehedge Road 
runs northwesterly and easterly from the northerly line of Salem Street and is more particularly described as 
follows: 

Beginning at the easterly face of a stone pillar in the northerly side of Salem Street and running N 36° 45' E a 
distance of 272 feet to a point thence swinging an arc 3 1 feet long with a radius of 24 feet to a point, thence running 
S 69° 30' E a distance of a 170 feet to land formerly of Mabel J. Trott. The other side of street being 40 feet 
distance and parallel thereto. 

Reference is hereby made to a plan of said road entitled "Part of Stonehedge Street, Andover, MA, Scale 1" = 40"' 
said Plan being recorded at the office of the Town Clerk as Plan Number 102. 

Said Stonehedge Road to be discontinued as a public way, but to continue as a private way subject to all existing 
utility easements and subject to such other necessary utility easements and such further restrictions as the Selectmen 
may deem advisable; or take any other action related thereto. 

151 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

On petition of the Trustees of Phillips Academy and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 59 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will accept by deed, grant or eminent domain the following five parcels of land 
on Jenkins Road, Andover, MA shown as Lots. No. 24, 25 and 26 on Plan 31783B, which plan is registered with 
the Registered Land Section of the North Essex Registry of Deeds and Lots No. 29 and 28 shown on Plan entitled 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan of Land "Deering Estates" Andover, Massachusetts dated January 29, 1996 for the 
purpose of adding to and alteration of a certain public way in the Town of Andover laid out and known as Jenkins 
Road. All of said lots are shown on "Street Acceptance As-built Plan of land in Andover, Massachusetts, Deering 
Estates, Scale 1" = 40', Dated: October 22, 1999, a copy of which plan has been filed with the Town Clerk. Final 
dimensions of the lots to be conveyed to the Town will be subject to approval of the Board of Selectmen prior to 
acceptance. 

On petition of James V. Carroll and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approved Article 60 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following General By-law allowing consideration of street 
acceptances under a single article at Town Meeting: 

"The Town Meeting may vote under a single article in the warrant to accept streets as public ways. Such article 
shall be submitted by the Board of Selectmen, and shall contain a listing of the names, locations and descriptions of 
all streets to be laid out by the Selectmen at a meeting held for that purpose pursuant to statute prior to the Town 
Meeting. The Town Meeting may vote to remove or reject any street or streets from the article by amendment prior 
to the vote on the entire article. The representative of the owner of any street listed in the article shall be present at 
the Town Meeting for purposes of addressing the question should the need arise." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 61 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a grant of land for 
purposes of expanding the existing layout of a portion of Stevens Street along the frontage of 5 Stevens Street 
(Assessors Map 37, Lot 24), at no cost to the Town and upon the terms and conditions which the Board of 
Selectmen deems in the best interest of the Town, which layout expansion involves strips of land on the north side 
of Stevens Street totaling between approximately 1,000 - 2,000 square feet, to be depicted on a plan of land duly 
recorded with the Registry of Deeds and acceptable in all respects to the Board of Selectmen; or take any other 
action related thereto. 

152 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

On petition of Northpoint Realty Development Corporation and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 62 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 62 was DEFEATED by a Majority Vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to authorize acceptance of a grant of a Conservation Easement as 
recommended by the Conservation Commission, said Conservation Easement involving the permanent addition of 
compensatory floor storage and a pedestrian trail on land located at 5 Stevens Street (Assessor's Map 37, Lot 24) at 
no cost to the Town and upon the terms and conditions which the Board of Selectmen deems in the best interest of 
the Town, to be depicted on a plan of land duly recorded with the Registry of Deeds and acceptable in all respects to 
the Board of Selectmen; or take any other action relative thereto. 

On petition of Northpoint Realty Development Corporation and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 63 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 63 was DEFEATED by a Majority Vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Conservation Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to authorize acceptance of a grant of a Conservation Restriction as 
recommended by the Conservation Commission, said Conservation Restriction involving the permanent addition of 
compensatory floor storage and a pedestrian trail on land located at 5 Stevens Street (Assessor's Map 37, Lot 24) at 
no cost to the Town and upon the terms and conditions which the Board of Selectmen deems in the best interest of 
the Town, to be depicted on a plan of land duly recorded with the Registry of Deeds and acceptable in all respects to 
the Board of Selectmen; or take any other action relative thereto. 

On petition of Northpoint Realty Development Corporation and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 64 as printed in the Warrant. 

Article 64 was DEFEATED by a Majority Vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Conservation Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a grant of land for 
purposes of expanding the existing layout of a portion of High Plain Road along the frontage of 407 High Plain 
Road and 4 1 1 High Plain Road at no cost to the Town and upon the terms and conditions which the Board of 
Selectmen deems in the best interest of the Town, which layout expansion involves strips of land on the northerly 
side of High Plain Road, namely Parcel A containing approximately 1,181 and Parcel B containing approximately 
1,324 square feet, as depicted on a plan of land entitled "High Meadow Definitive Subdivision Plan" duly recorded 
with the Essex North Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 13651; or take any other action relative thereto. 



153 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

On petition of Danforth/Carey & Co., Inc. and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 65 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority Vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate $600,000 for the purpose of 
constructing or reconstructing sidewalks, including installing granite curbs, planting trees and any other costs 
incidental and related thereto and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gift, 
purchase or eminent domain or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 66 was moved as printed in the Warrant. 

It was moved and duly seconded to amend Article 66 to appropriate $600,000 by taxation for the purpose of 
reconstructing sidewalks, including installing granite curbs, planting trees and other costs incidental and related 
thereto and to authorize the board of Selectmen to acquire any necessary easements by gifts, purchase or eminent 
domain or take any other action related thereto. 

The amendment was approved by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 184 NO: 158 A Majority Vote Required 

The amended motion was then taken up and was approved. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or 
by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $200,000 for the purpose of constructing a new 
bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on the east side of Woburn Street from Charlotte Drive to Parthenon 
Circle; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purpose or by seizure by right of 
eminent domain such land as may be required for this sidewalk; or take any other action related thereto, including 
easements. 

On petition of Kathleen Frazier and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriate the sum of $200,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on the east side of Woburn Street 
from Charlotte Drive to Parthenon Circle; that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to acquire by gift, by 
purchase or by eminent domain such land as may be required for this sidewalk; and that to meet this appropriation, 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and 
pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7(3) and 7(6) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue 
bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 67 was DEFEATED. 

154 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25, MAY 1, 2000 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or 
by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $130,000 for the purpose of constructing a new 
bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on the south side of High Plain Road from Beacon Street to the old 
entrance to West Elementary School (located between 57 and 63 High Plain Road); to reshape the entrance to High 
Plain Road from Beacon Street by "squaring off the current sweeping curve, and further to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain such land as may be required for 
this sidewalk; or take any other action related thereto, including easements, if necessary. 

On petition of Nancy Minigell and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriate the sum of $130,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on the south side of High Plain Road 
from Beacon Street to the old entrance of West Elementary School (located between 57 and 63 High Plain Road); 
and for reshaping the entrance to High Plain Road from Beacon Street by "squaring off the current sweeping curve; 
that the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or by eminent domain such land as may be required for 
this sidewalk; and that to meet this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen 
is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7(3) and 7(6) of the General Laws, or 
any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or 
by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $275,000 for the purpose of constructing a new 
bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on either side of High Street from the Town's snow dumping area 
to the traffic lights at Haverhill Street; and to further authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by 
purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain such land as may be required for this sidewalk; or take any other 
action related thereto, including easements. 

On petition of Sharon Faulkner and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town hereby appropriate the sum of $275,000 for the 
purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on either side of High Street from the 
Town's snow dumping area to the traffic lights at Haverhill Street; that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized 
to acquire by gift, by purchase or by eminent domain such land as may be required for this sidewalk; and that to 
meet this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to 
borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7(3) and 7(6) of the General Laws, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

Article 69 was DEFEATED. 

VOTE: YES: 155 NO: 148 A 2/3 Vote Required 



Finance Committee Report: No opinion 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 



155 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or 
by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $300,000 for the purpose of constructing a new 
bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on the northside of Chestnut Street from Upland Road to 
Highland Road; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, by purchase or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain such land or easements as may be required for this sidewalk; or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On petition of Chestnut Street Sidewalk Extension Association and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that that the Town hereby appropriate the sum of $300,000 for 
the purpose of constructing a new bituminous concrete sidewalk with granite curb on the northside of Chestnut 
Street from Upland Road to Highland Road; that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to acquire by gift, by 
purchase or by eminent domain such land or easements as may be required for this sidewalk; and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is authorized to borrow said sum 
under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Sections 7(3) and 7(6) of the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and 
to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town of Andover will vote to accept the provisions of Mass. G.L., Chapter 59, Section 
5 9 A, as follows: 

MASSACHUSETTS BROWNFIELDS ACT - TAX AGREEMENTS 

The Town of Andover is authorized, pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 59A, as 
amended, to enter into agreements regarding payment or abatements of real estate taxes, and/or interest, and/or 
penalties relative to sites or portions of sites within the Town of Andover, from or at which there has been a release 
of oil or hazardous materials. The following are necessary conditions and components of any such agreement: 

(a) the site or a portion thereof must be one from, or at which, there has been a contaminated release of 
oil or hazardous material; 

(b) the site or a potion thereof is zoned for commercial or industrial uses; 

(c) the agreement must be for the purpose of environmental cleanup and redevelopment of such site, 
and shall require submission of any plans to address such; 

(d) the agreement must provide: 

(i) the principal amount due of outstanding taxes, interest and penalties, before abatement of 
any amount thereof; 

(ii) the amount of taxes, interest and penalties to be abated, if any; 

(iii) the net amount of taxes, interest and penalties due after abatement; 

(iv) the percent of interest to accrue, if determined applicable; 

(v) the inception date of payment; 

(vi) the date of final payment; and 

(vii) late penalties and other terms of repayment. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

(e) agreements can only be made with an eligible owner as defined under M.G.L. Chapter 2 IE, Section 
2. Eligible owners are new, "innocent" purchasers who did not own the site at the time the oil or 
hazardous material was released and did not cause or contribute to its release; 

(f) such agreements shall be negotiated by the Town Manager (with the assistance of the Manager's 
various departmental staff members), the Town Treasurer and the Board of Assessors; 

(g) such agreements shall be subject to the approval vote of the Board of Selectmen; 

(h) such agreements, as required by said M.G.L. Chapter 59, Section 59A, shall be signed by the 
eligible property owner and the Chair of the Board of Selectmen; 

(i) such agreements shall be notarized and attested to by the Town Clerk; 

(j) such agreements shall contain any other provisions as may be required by law, ordinance or 
regulation of the Department of Revenue; 

(k) in the event any such agreement reduces the tax to be paid, abatements must be processed and 
charged to the overlays for the fiscal years of the taxes abated; 

(1) copies of the executive agreement shall be provided to the eligible property owner, the Board of 
Selectmen, and the following state and federal agencies; Massachusetts Department of Revenue 
(Property Tax Bureau), Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and United States 
Environmental Protection Agency. 

On petition of Jeffrey D. Sheehy and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded article 7 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

VOTE: YES: 177 NO: 152 A Majority Vote Required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 72. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer of available funds, by borrowing, or by 
any combination of the foregoing, and appropriate the sum of $145,000 to represent the interests of the residents of 
the Town of Andover before all state and federal permitting agencies and if necessary, before the Superior Court on 
appeal, of any decisions made by such agencies regarding the Nickel Hill Energy power plant proposal in Dracut if 
the health and safety concerns of the Andover community are not adequately protected and/or if the factors involved 
in siting such a facility are not fairly and adequately considered in the decision-making process. 

On petition of Laura Jordan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 72 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $145,000 
from free cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Board of Health: Approval 

157 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

ARTICLE 73. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VI.N.l. (Wireless Communications Facility) of the 
Zoning By-law by adding to the first sentence thereof the following language which appears in bold and deleting 
therefrom the language in italic brackets: 

"1. Setback and height: Towers, antennas, antenna support structures and other vertical elements of wireless 
communications facilities situated on property abutting a residential district or on a lot in residential 
use, or upon property in a residential district [located in a residential district or upon a property abutting 
a residential use] shall be set back from the nearest residential lot line, even if that lot line is in another 
municipality, a horizontal distance at least equal to three times their vertical height." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 73 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 74. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law, Article VIII, Section V.B.2.i by deleting 
the words "five (5) feet", and adding the words "ten (10) feet." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Inspector of Buildings 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 74 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: No Position 

ARTICLE 75. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section V.B.12. (Lot/slope requirements) of the Zoning By- 
law by adding thereto the words or language which appears in bold and by deleting therefrom the words or 
language which appears in italic brackets, under the following subsections: 

"a. The purposes of this subsection shall be: to preserve and enhance the landscape [amenities] by encouraging 
the maximum retention of natural topographic features, such as drainage swales, streams, slopes, ridge lines, rock 
outcroppings, vistas, natural plant formations and trees; to minimize the effects of grading to insure that the natural 
character of steep slopes is retained; to minimize water runoff and soil-erosion problems incurred in grading of 
steep slopes; to encourage innovative architectural, landscaping, circulation and site design. For the purposes of 
this subsection, the term "natural" shall be defined as the condition of the ground surface as it exists at the 
time a subdivision or development is proposed including any man-made alterations such as grading, 
excavation or filling which may have occurred prior to the time such subdivision or development is 
submitted. No land intended for subdivision or development may be regraded or filled in such manner as to 
circumvent this by-law. [For the purposes of this subsection, the term "natural slope " shall be defined as the 
elevation of the ground surface in its natural state, before man-made alterations such as grading, excavation or 
filling.] 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

d. All natural slopes exceeding 35% over a horizontal distance of 10 feet as measured perpendicular to the 
contour on a tract or parcel of land intended or proposed for subdivision or on a building lot are protected and 
shall remain undisturbed, [in their natural state.] 

e. All areas with natural slopes exceeding 25% over a horizontal distance of 30 feet as measured perpendicular to 
the contour on a tract or parcel of land intended or proposed for subdivision or development, or on a lot 
intended for building purposes, shall be excluded from the calculation of the minimum lot area required for the 
applicable zoning district.' 1 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 75 as printed in the Warrant 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Conservation Commission: Approval 

ARTICLE 76. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law by adding thereto the following new 
section V.B.13. (Exceptions and Special Requirements): 

"13. Except as otherwise provided for in this by-law not more than one building designed or available for use for 
dwelling purposes shall be erected or converted to use as such on any lot, parcel or tract of land in the town." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 76 as printed in the Warrant 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 77. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into an inter-municipal 
agreement with other towns in order to participate in the Greater Merrimack Valley Hazardous Waste Consortium 
to allow for the proper and regular disposal of household hazardous wastes by Andover residents at a centrally 
located household hazardous waste disposal site, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 77 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Board of Health: Approval 

Conservation Commission: Approval 



159 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

ARTICLE 78. To see if the Town will vote to add the following new General By-law which would regulate the 
placement of newsracks and similar devices on any public property and in any public way within the Town of 
Andover: 

"Newsracks on Public Property and Public Ways. 

A. Purpose and criteria: The purpose of this by-law is to promote the public health, safety and welfare of the 
inhabitants of Andover through the regulation of placement, type, appearance and servicing of newsracks on public 
property and in public ways so as to: 

(1) Provide for pedestrian and driving safety and convenience; 

(2) Minimize to the greatest extent possible interference with the safe and efficient movement of 
pedestrians and vehicular traffic, including ingress into or egress from any building situated along a 
public way, or movement along any public sidewalk or between a public way and a public sidewalk; 

(3) Provide for safe and adequate access to poles, posts, traffic signs and signals, hydrants, mailboxes 
and areas used for public transportation services; 

(4) Relocate and/or replace newsracks which result in a visual blight and/or excessive space allocation 
on public property and public ways, or which unreasonably detract from surrounding aesthetics, 
including adjacent properties, landscaping and other improvements, as well as to have abandoned or 
unused newsracks removed; 

(5) To regulate in a fair and equal manner all newsracks and their contents. 



B. Definitions. As used in this by-law, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated: 

(1) Newsrack - Any type of unmanned device or enclosure intended for the vending or free distribution 
of newspapers, periodicals, magazines or other literature. 

(2) Public property - Any municipally-owned land or building located in the Town of Andover. 

(3) Public way - Any public street, highway, sidewalk, parkway or alley located in the Town of 
Andover. 

C. General placement of newsracks. Subject to the specifications and prohibitions set forth in this by-law, 
newsracks may be installed on public property and in public ways, however, such newsracks shall be placed 
parallel to and no closer than eighteen (18) inches from the curb, or near the wall of a building parallel to and not 
more than six (6) inches from the wall. 

D. Newsrack specifications: 

(1) Newsracks shall be maintained in good working order at all times, freshly painted and with 
unbroken handles. There shall be no sharp or jagged edges or protrusions on any newsrack which 
could cause injury or damage to persons or vehicles; 

(2) The name, address and telephone number of a responsible person who may be contacted at any time 
shall be displayed on the newsrack in such manner as to be readily visible and readable; 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1, 2000 

(3) Newsracks shall be either freestanding or shall be bolted in place through four (4) standard holes in 
the newsrack base. No newsrack may be chained, wired, cabled, attached or fixed to any pole, post, 
tree, fence, bench, trash receptacle or any other structure on public property or in a public way 
unless such anchor has been provided specifically for such purpose. If a bolted newsrack is 
removed, the bolts shall be likewise removed entirely and the holes shall be filled with suitable 
material; 

(4) Newsracks shall carry no cardholders or advertising except the name of the newspaper or material 
being dispensed and/or a copy of the latest edition of such material behind a clear panel in the door 
of the newsrack. 

(5) Except for the clear panel, all surfaces of a newsrack shall be either green, beige, brown or gray in 
color with a flat finish. Brilliant or fluorescent-type finish is not permitted. 

E. Newsrack prohibitions. No newsrack shall be placed, installed, used or maintained: 

( 1 ) Within ten (10) feet of any marked crosswalk; 

(2) Within ten (10) feet of any fire hydrant, fire or police call box, or other emergency facility or device; 

(3) Within ten (10) feet of any driveway; 

(4) Within ten (10) feet ahead of and ten (10) feet to the rear of any sign marking a designated bus stop, 
as measured along the edge of the pavement or curb line; 

(5) At any location where the clear space for passage of pedestrians would be reduced to less than six 
(6) feet; 

(6) Within five (5) feet of any display window of any building abutting any sidewalk or in such a 
manner as to impede or interfere with the use of such window display purpose, or within six (6) feet 
of any building entrance; 

(7) Facing another newsrack, separated only by the width of a sidewalk or pedestrian walkway; 

(8) Within five (5) feet of any sign, street light pole, traffic signal pole, utility poles or parking meters. 

F. Enforcement. This by-law shall be enforced by the Inspector of Buildings subject to the following: 

(1) Nonconforming newsracks. Within one hundred (100) days after the effective date of this by-law, and 
at any time thereafter, any newsrack in violation or nonconformance with any provision of this by-law 
shall be subject to remedy as provided by law, including but not limited to the imposition of fines, and 
removal by the Town; 

(2) Abandonment. In the event that any newsrack installed pursuant to this by-law does not contain the 
publication specified therefor within a period of forty-eight (48) hours after release of the current issue 
or when no publication is in the newsrack for a period of more than seven (7) consecutive days, the 
newsrack shall be considered abandoned and the Town shall thereafter remove such newsrack. In the 
event that a newspaper publishing company or its distributor desires to voluntarily abandon or 
discontinue a newsrack location, said newsrack shall be completely removed, and the public property 
or public way shall be promptly restored to a safe condition, leaving no holes or projections in any 
surface. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24 25. MAY 1. 2000 

G. Severability. If any subsection, paragraph, term or provision of this section is determined to be illegal, invalid 
or unconstitutional by any court of competent jurisdiction, such determination shall have no effect on any other 
paragraph, term or provision hereof, all of which shall remain in full force and effect." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 78 was WITHDRAWN by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 79. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $30,000 for 
a study of the downtown parking needs and construction of an off-street parking facility or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 79 was moved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $30,000 
from free cash. 

Article 79 was DEFEATED by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 80. To see if the Town will vote to: 

(a) transfer custody and control to the Board of Selectmen and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
abandon all of the Town's right, title and interest in and to a portion of a certain water line easement which is 
located on land at 407-41 1 High Plain Road and shown on Plan No. 7036 and Plan No. 13651 as duly recorded with 
Essex North District Registry of Deeds. Said abandonment shall be upon the following conditions: (I) that prior to 
the abandonment of the easement, the Selectmen accept the grant of the water line easement referred to in Section 
(b) of this article; and (II) that prior to the abandonment of the easement the owner of said property relocate or 
reconstruct portions of existing water pipes within the easement area to be abandoned to the new easement 
described in Section (b) to the satisfaction of the Andover Department of Public Works; 

(b) authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept a grant of easement for water line purposes over High 
Meadow Road and over Lot 5 of High Meadow Subdivision, said easement shown as a "proposed 20 foot wide 
water easement" on a plan entitled "High Meadow Definitive Subdivision Plan" duly recorded with Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 13651; said water line easement to be at no cost to the Town and upon the 
terms and conditions which the Board of Selectmen deems in the best interest of the Town; and 

(c) or take any other action relative thereto. 

On petition of Danforth/Carey & Co., Inc. and others 
Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 80 as printed in the Warrant. 
VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

ARTICLE 81. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate the sum of $100,000 
to undertake a Ballardvale Community Master Plan including but not limited to an analysis of: land uses, zoning 
and buildout of Ballardvale and the Lowell Junction industrial area, traffic impacts, pedestrian and vehicular safety 
improvements, street scape and traffic calming improvements, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 8 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $40,000 
from free cash by a Majority vote. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 82. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 
VI.0.5.d(l) by adding after the words "1. Lot Size. Each lot shall be not less than 10 acres nor more than 25 
acres;" the following words: "however, the Planning Board, as part of the process of issuing a Special Permit for 
Attached Cluster under Section VI.O.5, may allow a maximum lot size in excess of 25 acres if the Planning Board 
finds that to do so would better serve the purposes set forth in Section VI.0.5.a." 

On petition of Richard G. Asoian and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved to approve Article 82 as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 83. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law, Article VIII, Section 
VI.0.5.f.(4) by deleting in its first line the words "four (4) rooms" and replacing the same with the words "eight (8) 
rooms". 

On petition of Richard G Asoian and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the town vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law, 
Article VIII, Section VI.0.5.f. (4) by deleting in its first line the words "four (4) rooms" and replacing the same 
with the words "six (6) rooms". 

VOTE: Declared less than a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen Report: No Position 
Planning Board Report: Disapproval 



163 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1 , 2000 

ARTICLE 84. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-law, Article VIII, Section VI.I Flood 
Hazard District by deleting the section in its entirety and replacing the same with the following language; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VI.I FLOOD HAZARD DISTRICT 

1 . STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 

SECTION A. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE 
The purposes of the Floodplain District are to: 

1) Ensure public safety through reducing the threats to life and personal injury; 

2) Eliminate new hazards to emergency response officials; 

3) Prevent the occurrence of public emergencies resulting from water quality, contamination and 
pollution due to flooding; 

4) Avoid the loss of utility services which if damaged by flooding would disrupt or shut down the 
utility network and impact regions of the community beyond the site of flooding; 

5) Eliminate costs associated with the response and cleanup of flooding conditions; 

6) Reduce damage to public and private property resulting from flooding water. 

2. FLOODPLAIN DISTRICT BOUNDARIES AND BASE FLOOD ELEVATION AND FLOODWAY 
DATA 

SECTION A. FLOODPLAIN DISTRICT BOUNDARIES 

The Floodplain District is herein established as an overlay district. The District includes all special flood 
hazard areas designated on the Andover Floor Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) issued by the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the administration of the NFIP dated June 5, 1989 as Zone A, 
AE, AH, AG, Al-30, A99, V, Vl-30, VE and the FEMA Flood Boundary & Floodway Map dated June 5, 
1989, both maps which indicate the 100-year regulatory floodplain. The exact boundaries of the District 
may be defined by the 100-year base flood elevations shown on the FIRM and further defined by the 1989 
Flood Insurance study booklet dated. The FIRM, Floodway Maps and Flood Insurance Study booklet are 
incorporated herein by reference and are on file with the Town Clerk, Planning Board, Building Official and 
Conservation Commission. 

SECTION B. BASE FLOOD ELEVATION AND FLOODWAY DATA 

1. Floodway Data . In Zone A, Al-30 and AE, along watercourses that have not had a regulatory 
floodway designated, the best available Federal, State, local or other floodway data shall be used to 
prohibit encroachments in floodways which would result in any increase in flood levels within the 
community during the occurrence of the base flood discharge. 

2. Base Flood Elevation Data - Base flood elevation data is required for subdivision proposals or other 
developments greater than 50 lots or 5 acres, whichever is the lesser, within unnumbered A zones. 

3. NOTIFICATION OF WATERCOURSE ALTERATION 

Notify, in a riverine situation, the following of any alternation or relocation of a watercourse: 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24, 25 MAY 1, 2000 

1. Adjacent communities 

2. NFIP State Coordinator 
Massachusetts Office of Water Resources 
100 Cambridge Street 

Boston, MA 02202 

3. NFIP Program Specialist 
FEMA Region I, Room 462 

J.W. McCormack Post Office & Courthouse 
Boston, MA 02109 

4. USE REGULATIONS 

SECTION A. REFERENCE TO EXISTING REGULATIONS 

The Floodplain District is established as an overlay district to all other districts. All development in the district, 
including structural and non-structural activities, whether permitted by right or by special permit must be in 
compliance with Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws and with the following: 

4. Section of the Massachusetts State Building Code which addresses floodplain and coastal high hazard 
areas (currently 780 CMR 2102.0, Flood Resistant Construction); 

5. Wetlands Protection Regulations, Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) (currently 310 CMR 
10.00); 

6. Minimum Requirements for the Subsurface Disposal of Sanitary Sewage, DEP (currently 310 CMR 15, 
Title 5); 

7. Any deviations from the provisions and requirements of the above referenced state regulations may only 
be granted as a Special Permit by the Zoning Board of Appeals in accordance with the required variance 
procedures of these state regulations. 

5. PERMITTED USES 

The following uses of low flood damage potential and causing no obstructions to flood flows are 
encouraged provided they are permitted in the underlying district and they do not require structures, fill or 
storage of materials or equipment: 

1) Agricultural uses such as farming, grazing, truck farming, horticulture, etc. 

2) Forestry and nursery, uses. 

3) Outdoor recreational uses, including fishing, boating, play areas, etc. 

4) Conservation of water, plants, wildlife. 

5) Wildlife management areas, foot bicycle and/or horse paths. 

6) Temporary non-residential structures used in connection with fishing, growing, harvesting, storage 
or sale of crops raised on the premises. 

7) Buildings lawfully existing prior to the adoption of these provisions. 

6. DEFINITIONS 

AREA OF SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD is the land in the floodplain within a community subject to a one percent 
or greater chance of flooding in any given year. The area may be designated as Zone A, AG, AH, A 1-30, AE, A99, 
Vl-30, VEorV. 

BASE FLOOD means the flood having a one percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year. 

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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

COASTAL HIGH HAZARD AREA means the area subject to high velocity waters, including but not limited to 
hurricane wave wash or tsunamis. The area is designated on a FIRM as Zone V, VI -30, VE. 

DEVELOPMENT means any manmade change to improved or unimproved real estate, including but not limited to 
buildings or other structures, mining, dredging, filling, grading, paving, excavation or drilling operations. 

DISTRICT means floodplain district. 

EXISTING MANUFACTURED HOME PARK OR SUBDIVISION means a manufactured home park or 
subdivision for which the construction of facilities for servicing the lots on which the manufactured homes are to 
be affixed (including, at a minimum, the installation of utilities, the construction of streets, and either final site 
grading or the pouring of concrete pads) is completed before the effective date of the floodplain management 
regulations adopted by a community. 

EXPANSION TO AN EXISTING MANUFACTURED HOME PARK OR SUBDIVISION means the preparation 
of additional sites by the construction of facilities for servicing the lots on which the manufactured homes are to be 
affixed (including the installation of utilities, the construction of streets and either final site grading or the pouring 
of concrete pads). 

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (FEMA) administers the National Flood Insurance 
program. FEMA provides a nationwide flood hazard area mapping study program for communities as well as 
regulatory standards for development in the floor hazard areas. 

FLOOD BOUNDARY AND FLOODWAY MAP means an official map of a community issued by FEMA that 
depicts, based on detailed analyses, the boundaries of the 100-year and 500-year floods and the 100-year floodway. 
(For maps done in 1987 and later, the floodway designation is included on the FIRM). 

FLOOD HAZARD BOUNDARY MAP (FHBM) means an official map of a community issued by FEMA where 
the boundaries of the flood and related erosion areas having special hazards have been designated as Zone A or E. 

FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP (FIRM) means an official map of a community on which FEMA has delineated 
both the areas of special flood hazard and the risk premium zones applicable to the community. 

FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY means an examination, evaluation and determination of flood hazards, and, if 
appropriate, corresponding water surface elevations, or an examination, evaluation and determination of flood- 
related erosion hazards. 

FLOODWAY means the channel of a river or other watercourse and the adjacent land areas that must be reserved in 
order to discharge the base flood without cumulatively increasing the water surface elevation. 

LOWEST FLOOR means the lowest floor of the lowest enclosed area (including basement or cellar). An 
unfinished or floor resistant enclosure, usable solely for parking of vehicles, building access or storage in an area 
other than a basement area is not considered a building's lowest floor, provided that such enclosure is not built so as 
to render the structure in violation of the applicable non-elevation design requirements of NFIP Regulations 60.3. 

MANUFACTURED HOME means a structure, transportable in one or more sections, which is built on a permanent 
chassis and is designed for use with or without a permanent foundation when connected to the required utilities. For 
floodplain management purposes the term "manufactured home" also includes park trailers, travel trailers, and other 
similar vehicles placed on a site for greater than 180 consecutive days. For insurance purposes, the term 
"manufactured home" does not include park trailers, travel trailers and other similar vehicles. 

166 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25, MAY 1, 2000 

MANUFACTURED HOME PARK OR SUBDIVISION means a parcel (or contiguous parcels) of land divided into 
two or more manufactured home lots for rent or sale. 

NEW CONSTRUCTION means, for floodplain management purposes, structures for which the "start of 
construction" commenced on or after the effective date of a floodplain management regulation adopted by a 
community. For the purpose of determining insurance rates, new construction means structures for which the "start 
of construction" commenced on or after the effective date of an initial FIRM or after December 31, 1974, whichever 
is later. 

NEW MANUFACTURED HOME PARK OR SUBDIVISION means a manufactured home park or subdivision for 
which the construction of facilities for servicing the lots on which the manufactured homes are to be affixed 
(including, at a minimum, the installation of utilities, the construction of streets, and either final site grading or the 
pouring of concrete pads) is completed on or after the effective date of the floodplain management regulations 
adopted by a community. 

ONE-HUNDRED YEAR FLOOD - see BASE FLOOD. 

REGULATORY FLOODWAY - see FLOODWAY. 

SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREA means an area having special flood and/or flood-related erosion hazards, and 
shown on an FHBM or FIRM as Zone A, AO, A 1-30, AE, A99, AH, V, VI -30, VE. 

START OF CONSTRUCTION includes substantial improvement, and means the date the building permit was 
issued, provided the actual start of construction, repair, reconstruction, rehabilitation, addition, placement, or other 
improvement was within 180 days of the permit date. The actual start means either the first placement of permanent 
construction of a structure on a site, such as the pouring of slab or footings, the installation of piles, the construction 
of columns, or any work beyond the stage of excavation; or the placement of a manufactured home on a foundation. 
For a substantial improvement, the actual start of construction means the first alteration of any wall, ceiling or floor, 
or other structural part of a building, whether or not that alteration affects the external dimensions of the building. 

STRUCTURE means, for floodplain management purposes, a walled and roofed building, including a gas or liquid 
storage, that is principally above ground, as well as a manufactured home. Structure, for insurance coverage 
purposes, means a walled and roofed building, other than a gas or liquid storage tank, that is principally above 
ground and affixed to a permanent site, as well as a manufactured home on foundation. For the latter purpose, the 
term includes a building while in the course of construction, alteration or repair, but does not include building 
materials or supplies intended for use in such construction, alteration, or repair, unless such materials or supplies are 
within an enclosed building on the premises. 

SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGE means damage of any origin sustained by a structure whereby the cost of restoring the 
structure to its before damaged condition would equal or exceed 50 percent of the market value of the structure 
before the damage occurred. 

SUBSTANTIAL IMPROVEMENT means any reconstruction, rehabilitation, addition, or other improvement of a 
structure, the cost of which equals or exceeds 50 percent of the market value of the structure before the "start of 
construction" of the improvement. This term includes structures which have incurred "substantial damage", 
regardless of the actual repair work performed. 

ZONE A means the 100-year floodplain area where the base flood elevation (BFE) has not been determined. To 
determine the BFE, use the best available federal, state, local or other data. 

ZONE A1-A30 and ZONE AE (for new and revised maps) means the 100-year floodplain where the base flood 

elevation has been determined. .. ,„ 

16/ 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24. 25. MAY 1. 2000 

ZONE AH and ZONE AO means the 100-year floodplain with flood depths of 1 to 3 feet. 

ZONE A99 means areas to be protected from the 1 00-year flood by federal flood protection system under 
construction. Base flood elevations have not been determined. 

ZONES B, C AND X are areas identified in the community Floor Insurance Study as areas of moderate or minimal 
flood hazard. Zone X replaces Zones B and C on new and revised maps. 

On petition of Northpoint Realty Development Corporation and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to WITHDRAW Article 84 by a Majority vote. 

ARTICLE 85. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate from available funds the sum of $9,000 for the 2000 
Independence Day fireworks celebration or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 85 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the amount of $9,000 
by transferring $1,500 from Article 45, 1997 Fireworks, $500 from Article 82, 1998 Fireworks and $7,000 from 
Free Cash. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

ARTICLE 86. To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town by adding the following 
by-law: 

In accordance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 177 A, as amended, any individual or 
business desiring to keep and operate an automatic amusement device for hire, gain or reward shall secure an annual 
license from the Board of Selectmen. The Board of Selectmen shall not grant a license for any automatic 
amusement device which presents a risk of misuse as a gaming device. 

Automatic amusement devices that present a risk of misuse as gaming devices are those that have one or 
more of the following: 

The device involves matching random numbers, patterns or cards. 

The device accumulates more than twenty-six (26) plays. 

The device is equipped with a "knock off switch, button or similar device. 

The device has a mechanism for adjusting the odds. 

The device has a remote control feature that can reset the device from another location. 

The device is capable of returning money to the player, other than the change for the excess amount put in. 

The device permits a player to pay for more than one game at a time. 

Each game on the device shall cost exactly the same amount for each player and no player may change any 
aspect of the game by paying a different amount than any other player before or during the game. There shall be no 
metering device that accounts for both money/points in and money/points out. 

The maximum number of automatic amusement devices allowed on any single business premises shall be 
four (4) except in the case of duly licensed arcades and amusement parks. Any individual or business desiring more 
than four (4) automatic amusements devices on a single business premises shall require a special permit from the 
Board of Appeals. All licenses for automatic amusement devices granted by the Board of Selectmen shall be 

168 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 24 25. MAY 1, 2000 

subject to inspection by the Andover Police Department to insure conformance with this amusement device by-law 
and the submitted application information. Any unlicensed automatic amusement device shall be subject to 
immediate seizure by the Andover Police Department. 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Police Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 86 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote to 
dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 10:31 P.M. 

A true record 
ATTEST 



cjfa tfoM^dkwmJ 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



169 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14, 2000 



WARRANT 

ART. NO DESCRIPTION 



ACTION 
TAKEN 



APPR. BY 
ATTY. GEN. 



1. 



Brookfield Road Water Main 
$500,000 Eminent Domain 



Approved 



2. 


Unpaid Bill $6959.20 


Approved 


3. 


Street Acceptance - Acorn Drive 


Withdrawn 


4. 


Street Acceptance - Basswood Lane 


Withdrawn 


5. 


Street Acceptance - Buttonwood Drive 


Withdrawn 


6. 


Street Acceptance - Hazelwood Circle 


Withdrawn 


7. 


Street Acceptance - Meadow View Lane 


Approved 


8. 


Street Acceptance - Ashbury Lane 


Approved 


9. 


Conservation Land Transfer 
Orchard Street 


Approved 


10. 


Land Transfer - Greenwood Road 


Approved 


11. 


Youth Center Proposal 


Approved 


12. 


Conservation Land Use Change 


Approved 



13. 



14. 



Alpine Drive - Special Legislation 

Northeast Massachusetts Mosquito 

& Wetlands Control District Agreement 



Approved 



Andover Zoning Bylaw Re-Codification Withdrawn 



170 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14. 2000 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14, 2000 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, October 2, 2000, The Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in the Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the Collins Center, 
Andover High School, on Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, 

TUESDAY NOVEMBER 14 AND WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2000 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town 
Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover TOWNSMAN. Said Warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Ronald F. Ford 
Constable 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1 020 voters admitted to the meeting. 

James D. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:12 P.M. 

Rev. Peter T. Richardson, Unitarian-Universalist Church, 6 Locke Street, offered the opening 
prayer. 

Brian P. Major, Chairman, Board of Selectman, led the salute to the flag. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 69 non- voters to the meeting and allow non-voters to be 
escorted to the non-voting section thereafter. 

The Moderator announced there would be no smoking or food in the Collins Center. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent that the Moderator 
refer to the articles by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator introduced the stage participants to meeting members. 

The Moderator announced the voting sections of the Hall. 

The Moderator introduced the "Ombudsman" Charles Dalton to the meeting members. 

The Moderator referred to the guide on the back page of the finance committee book that 
outlines rules and procedures of the Town Meeting. 

171 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14, 2000 



ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer and appropriate the sum of $500,000 from 
Water Capital Reserves for the purpose of replacing water mains in the Brookfield Road area, 
including any costs incidental and related thereto, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire any necessary easements by gift, purchase or eminent domain or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works 



Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $500,000 from Water Capitol Reserves. 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 vote by Moderator 2/3 VOTE Required 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Finance Committee: Approval 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 2 was approved as printed in the Warrant in the 
amount of $6,959.20. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by Moderator A 4/5 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Finance Committee: Approval 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Acorn Drive, as 
shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100' Date: 
January 15, 1991 Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, 
Andover, Mass. Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", 
which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On request of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 3 was WITHDRAWN. 



172 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14. 2000 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Basswood Lane, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100' Date: 
January 15, 1991 Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, 
Andover, Mass. Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", 
which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On request of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 4 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Buttonwood 
Drive, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100' Date: 
January 15, 1991 Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb Road, 
Andover, Mass. Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, Mass.", 
which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12000. 

On request of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 5 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Hazelwood 
Circle, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan 
entitled, "Definitive Subdivision Plan 'Fieldstone Meadows' Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100' 
Date: January 15, 1991 Owner & Applicant: Wyncrest Development Corp., 108 Dascomb 
Road, Andover, Mass. Surveyor: Andover Consultants, Inc., 1 East River Place, Methuen, 
Mass.", which plan is recorded with Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 
12000. 

On request of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 6 was WITHDRAWN. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Meadow View 
Lane, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, as shown on a Plan entitled, 
"Definitive Plan Meadow View Andover, MA Applicant: Yvon Cormier, c/o Yvon Cormier 
Construction Co., Inc., 59 Chandler Circle, Andover, MA 01810 W.C. Cammett Engineering, 
Inc., 297 Elm Street, Amesbury, MA Date 3/2/94 Scale: 1 ' = 40", which plan is recorded with 
Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 12415. 

On request of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 7 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

173 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14. 2000 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, Ashbury Lane, 
as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board, entitled "SUBDIVISION PLAN 
OF LAND IN ANDOVER, MASS. ENTITLED ASHBURY LANE", and dated August 11, 
1997, revised November 10, 1997; Owner: Coolidge Construction Co., 401 Andover Street, 
North Andover, MA 01845; Engineer: Merrimack Engineering Services, 66 Park St., Andover, 
MA 01810, which plan is recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan 
Number 13484. 

On request of Phillip F. Sullivan and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 8 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and control of the land at 
24 Orchard Street, shown as Parcel 14 on Assessors Map 60, being Parcel "A" open space on a 
plan recorded in Essex North Registry of Deeds, Plan 10646, described in Book 2660, Page 198, 
containing 2.64 acres, to the Andover Conservation Commission or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 9 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more that a 2/3 vote by Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody and control of the 
approximately 6.33 acres of land on Greenwood Road, as shown on a plan titled "Survey of Land 
in Andover, Mass. (West Parish), Made for Town of Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 100", April 
1941" Morse, Dickinson & Goodwin, Engineers and described as the SECOND TRACT in an 
order of taking dated August 25, 1941 recorded at the Essex County North Registry of Deeds at 
Book 644 Page 372, to the Selectmen for general municipal purposes, including but not limited 
to a Fire Station, Youth Center, Senior Center, Community Center, Public Works Facility or 
Plant and Facilities Facility or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 
Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 10 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 
VOTE: Declared Unanimous by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Finance Committee: Approval 



174 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14, 2000 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to issue a 
Request for Proposal and to enter into an Agreement and Lease, if necessary, for the 
construction, equipping and furnishing of a Youth Center with no Town funds, by a private 
entity on the approximately 6.33 acres of land on Greenwood Road, as shown on a plan titled 
"Survey of Land in Andover, Mass. (West Parish), Made for Town of Andover, Mass. Scale 1" = 
100', April 1941" Morse, Dickinson & Goodwin, Engineers and described as the SECOND 
TRACT in an order of taking dated August 25, 1941 recorded at the Essex County North 
Registry of Deeds at Book 644 Page 372, and to authorize the Selectmen to allow such 
construction of a Youth Center on said land and to accept the Youth Center when it is completed, 
all on terms and conditions deemed by the Selectmen to be in the best interests of the Town or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 1 1 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: YES: 841 NO: 70 A Majority Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 
Finance Committee: Approval 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to change the use of the land under the control of 
the Conservation Commission shown on Assessors Map 191, Lot 3, off of Alpine Drive, to allow 
the Conservation Commission to grant a sewer easement approximately 205 feet in length and 
approximately 20 feet wide to the Town under the control of the Board of Selectmen for the 
purpose of installing a sewer line within the easement and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
petition the General Court for Special Legislation to accomplish the foregoing or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of Department of Public Works 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 12 was approved as printed in the Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared Unanimous by Moderator A 2/3 Vote Required 

Board of Selectmen: Approval 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into an 
agreement to join the Northeast Massachusetts Mosquito and Wetlands Control District for the 
minimal period of three years effective July 1, 2001 or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Health 
Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 1 3 was approved as printed in the Warrant by a 
Majority Vote. 

Board of Selectmen: Disapproval 
Finance Committee: Disapproval 
Board of Health: Approval 



175 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14, 2000 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, by 
making the following changes: 

ITEM 1 . Delete the Andover Zoning Bylaw in its entirety, including the following sections of 
the Zoning Bylaw: 



SECTION 
Section I. 
Section II. 
Section III. 
Section IV. 

Section V. 

Section VI. 



Section VII. 



SUBJECT 

Purpose 

Definitions 

Establishment of Districts 

Use Regulations 

Table of Use Regulations 

Dimensional Requirements 

Table of Dimensional Requirements 

Other Requirements, including parking; signs; 
landscaping, buffering, lighting; cluster 
development; earth movement; Office Park District; 
Agriculture and livestock; Industrial D; Flood 
Hazard District; Accessory Scientific Uses; Design 
Advisory Group; General Business District Design 
Guidance; Towers; Wireless Communications; 
Multiple Dwellings; Watershed Protection Overlay 
District; Site Plan Review; Mixed Use District; 
Child Care Facility; Unregistered vehicle or vehicle 
not in condition for travel; Adult Uses; Elderly 
Housing; Alternative modes of travel; Minimum 
Parking Space and Aisle Dimensions for Parking 
Areas 

Nonconformance 



Section VIII. Administration and procedure 

ITEM 2. Add the following new sections in the Re-Codified Andover Zoning Bylaw as follows: 

SECTION SUBJECT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Table of Contents 



176 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14, 2000 



SECTION 

SECTION 1.0. 

1.1 

1.2. 

1.3. 

1.4. 

1.5. 

1.6. 

SECTION 2.0. 

2.1. 

2.2. 
2.3. 
2.4 



SUBJECT 

PURPOSE AND AUTHORITY 

Purpose 

Authority 

Scope 

Applicability 

Amendments 

Severability 

DISTRICTS 

Establishment 

Overlay Districts 

Zoning Map 

Rules for Interpretation of Zoning District 

Boundaries 



SECTION 3.0. 

3.1. 
3.2. 
3.3. 

SECTION 4.0. 

4.1. 
4.2. 

SECTION 5.0. 

5.1. 

5.2. 
5.3. 

SECTION 6.0. 

6.1. 

6.2. 
6.3. 
6.4. 
6.5. 
6.6. 
6.7. 



USE REGULATIONS 

Principal Uses. 

Accessory Uses 

Nonconforming Uses and Structures 

DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

General 

Accessory Buildings and Structures 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Off-street Parking and Loading 

Signs 

Landscaping, Buffering and Lighting 

SPECIAL REGULATIONS 

Wireless Communication Facilities or Other Similar 

Communications Use 

Amateur Radio Facilities 

Earth Movement 

Wind Energy Towers 

Adult Uses 

Child Care Facility 

Unregistered Vehicles 



177 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14. 2000 



SECTION 

6.8. 
6.9. 

SECTION 7.0. 

7.1. 
7.2. 
7.3. 
7.4. 
7.5. 
7.6. 

SECTION 8.0. 



SUBJECT 

Alternative Modes of Transportation 
Agriculture and Livestock 

SPECIAL RESIDENTIAL REGULATIONS 

Cluster Development 
Planned Development 
Attached Cluster 
Elderly Housing 
Conversion to Multifamily Use 
Multiple Dwellings 

SPECIAL DISTRICT REGULATIONS 



8.1. 
8.2. 
8.3. 
8.4: 

8.5. 



Watershed Protection Overlay District 

Flood Hazard Overlay District 

Reserve 

Mixed Use District 

Industrial D District 



SECTION 9.0. 

9.1. 
9.2. 
9.3. 
9.4. 
9.5. 
9.6. 
9.7. 

SECTION 10.0. 

APPENDIX A 



ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURES 

Enforcement 
Board of Appeals 
Planning Board 
Special Permits 
Site Plan Review 
Design Review 
Repetitive Petitions 

DEFINITIONS 

TABLE 1 - Table of Use Regulations 
TABLE 2 - Table of Dimensional Requirements 
TABLE 3 - Table of Parking Requirements 
TABLE 4 - Parking Dimensions 



178 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 14. 2000 

A copy of the full text of these proposed articles may be reviewed at the Office of the Town 
Clerk or the Department of Community Development and Planning at the Town Offices during 
the regular business hours of Monday-Friday, 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. A copy of the full text is 
also available at the Andover Memorial Hall Library and on the Town's website 
(www.town.andover.ma.us) , or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

Upon motion made and duly seconded Article 14 was WITHDRAWN. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote 
to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 8:40 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



^Qt*J*^ £&**™J 



Randall L. Hanson 
Town Clerk 



179 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Community Development & Planning Department 
Director of Health 
Director of Planning 
Conservation Administrator 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Director of Community Services 

Director of Elder Services 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Information Systems Manager 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 
Veterans Service Agent 

Fire Chief 

Housing Authority Executive Director 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Director 

Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distribution 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Director of Youth Services 

180 



Everett F. Penney, Jr. 

Stephen L. Colyer 

James A. Greer 

KaijaM. Gilmore 

Richard J. Salenas 

Bruce P. Hale 

Mary L. Donohue 

Jeanne M. Madden 

Brian J. Pattullo 

Anthony J. Torrisi 

Bruce A. Symmes 

David J. Reilly 

Barbara D. Morache 

Elaine M. Shola 

John C. Doherty 

Charles H. Murnane, Jr. 

Christine L. Metzemaekers 

Candace A. Hall 

Joseph R. Piantedosi 

Kenneth H. Parker 

John D. O'Donnell, Jr. 

Stephen J. George 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. James D. Hashem 

John A. Petkus, Jr. 

John F. Canavan, Jr. 

Morris B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

James E. Sutton 

Dr. Claudia L. Bach 

Rodney P. Smith 

Randall L. Hanson 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 

William D. Fahey 




DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 





AS OF DECEMBER 31 


,2000 








ELECTED 






BOARD OF SELECTMEN 






SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




Brian P. Major, Ch. 


-2003 




Tina B. Girdwood, Ch. 


-2001 


Lori A. Becker 


-2001 




Eric J. Nadworny 


-2002 


Mary N. French 


-2002 




Frank Eccles 


-2000 


John P. Hess 


-2001 




Gerald F. Gustus 


-2003 


Ted E. Teichert 


-2003 




Richard J. Collins 


-2001 


ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 




REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 


Ronald C. Hajj, Ch. 


-2001 




Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawr. 


-2002 


Norma Villareal 


-2003 




Joseph M. Gleason, Andover 


-2003 


James A. Cuticchia 


-2004 




Thomas L. Grondine, Methuen 


-2002 


Francis A. O'Connor 


-2005 




Ronald F. Ford, Methuen 


-2002 


Hartley M. Burnham* 


-2001 




Evelyn A. Burke, Lawrence 


-2002 


* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of 




Sean Neilon, Lawrence 


-2002 


Executive Office of Communities 




Mark Ford, No. Andover 


-2002 


and Development 










TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 


TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 


Earl G. Efinger 


-2003 




John H. Caswell 


-2001 


Joan M. Lewis 


-2003 




Edward Cole 


-2002 


John R. Petty 


-2003 




Edward Morrissey 


-2003 


Donna C. Ellsworth 


-2003 








Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 


-2003 









Reverend Calvin F. Mutti 
Reverend James M. Diamond 
Reverend Joseph W. LaDu 



TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty 



-2001 



181 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Joanne F. Marden, Ch. 


-2003 


Margaret I. Jurgen 


-2002 


Debra R. Silberstein 


-2003 


Robert T. King 


-2002 


Richard D. Fox 


-2003 


Cynthia Milne 


-2001 


Thomas E. Fardy 


-2001 


Margaret M. Bradshaw 


-2002 


Timothy L. Felter 


-2003 


PLANNING BOARD 




Michael H. Miller, Ch. 


-2001 


Paul J. Salafia 


-2002 


Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 


-2003 


Susan A. Alovisetti 


-2003 


Linn N. Anderson 


-2004 


Sheila M. Doherty - Associate 


-2001 


MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2002 


Patricia H. Edmonds 


-2003 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2001 


Carolyn A. Fantini 


-2001 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2003 


Ruth M. Dunbar 


-2002 


Maria A. Rizzo 


-2003 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Ch. 


-2003 


Joseph I. Pelc 


-2001 


Dr. Daniel E. Coleman 


-2002 


DESIGN ADVISORY GROUP 


Ann E. Constantme 


-2001 


Susan W. Alovisetti 


-2001 


Donald J. Harding 


-2002 


CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



John R. Dempsey. Ch. 
Annetta R. Freedman 
Barbara Worcester 
Gerald H. Silverman 
Roger L. Jenkins 



2002 
2003 
2003 
2002 
2001 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Daniel S. Casper, Ch. - 2003 

Carol C . McDonough - 200 1 

Paul Bevacqua -2001 

Peter F. Reilly - 2002 

Pamela H. Mitchell - 2002 

David W. Brown - Associate - 2002 

Nancy K. Jeton - Associate - 2003 

Stephen D. Anderson - Associate -2001 

Lois Karfunkel - Associate - 2003 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Donald D. Cooper, Ch. - 2002 

Robert A. Pustell - 2003 

Paul J. Finger -2001 

Thomas J. Murphy - 2003 

Gail L. Ralston - 2003 

Prasanta K. Bhunia - 2002 

Philip Sutherland - 2001 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

Karen M. Herman, Ch. - 2003 

Ann E. Constantine - 2002 

Norma A. Gammon - 2002 

James S. Batchelder - 2003 

Dennis Ingram - 2001 

Raymond H. Flynn - 2001 

MarkDeLisio -2001 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Bruce Symmes -2001 

Archibald D. Maclaren -2003 

John R. Petty - 2002 

TOWLE FUND 

Phillip F. Sullivan - 2002 

Ruth E. Westcott - 2003 

Donna Dyer -2001 

RETIREMENT BOARD 

James Cuticchia, Ch. - 2002 

Marianne O'Leary -2001 

John C. Doherty - 2002 

James L. Edholm - 2003 

Rodney P. Smith Open 



182 



BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DIST. COMM. 



Dennis Ingram, Ch. 


-2001 


Diane R. Derby 


-2002 


Richard Bowen 


-2001 


Ron Abraham 


-2003 


Edward J. Morris sey 


-2003 


Christian Huntress 


-2003 


Charles Murnane, Jr. - Alt. 


-2003 


Mary Bogan - Alt. 


-2003 


SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 


Mark B. Johnson, Ch. 


-2001 


Alan J. Champagne 


-2002 


Dr. Claudia L. Bach 


-2002 


John J. Driscoll 


-2001 


TinaB. Girdwood 


-2002 


Raymond E. Hender 


-2003 


Bernard R. Morrissey 


-2003 


SPRING GROVE CEMETERY TRUSTEES 


Paul Caselle, Ch. 


-2002 


John S. Bigelow 


-2002 


Robert S. Hamilton 


-2001 


Arthur H. Richter 


-2003 


Joyce M. Ritterhaus 


-2001 


YOUTH COUNCIL 




Colleen Georgian 


-2002 


Craig D. Gibson 


-2002 


COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 


Michael Warshawsky, Ch. 


-2001 


William C. O'Heaney 


-2001 


Mark E. Van Doren 


-2002 


Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2001 


Justin J. Coppola, Sr. 


-2002 


Madelaine St. Amand 


-2003 


Gilbert DeMoor 


-2002 


Karen Jacobs-Gold 


-2002 


Nancy Tammik- Smith 


-2001 


HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 


David Hastings 


-2002 


Christopher D. Haynes 


-2002 


Lorene A. Comeau 


-2002 


Ronald C. Hajj 


-2002 


Joan Duff 


-2002 


Susan G. Stott 


-2002 


Donald M. Williamson 


-2003 


Lawrence B. Morse 


-2003 



PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 



Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. 
John A. Campbell 
John J. Lewis 
Harold W. Wright 
John C. Doherty 
Edward J. Morrissey 
Edward Cole 
Dorothy Volker 
James M. Deyermond 

RECYCLING COMMITTEE 

James T. Curtis, Ch. 
Anne Wein 
Joyce Rmgleb 
Candy Dann 
Jamie Doucett 
Sheila Lane 



-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
- 2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 



-2001 
-2003 
-2001 
-2003 
-2002 
-2001 



IND. DEV. FINANCING AUTHORITY 



Michael W. Morris, Esq., Ch. 
Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 
John E. Shuman 



-2003 
-2001 
-2001 



DEVELOPMENT & INDUSTRIAL COMM. 



S. Joseph Hoffman 



CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Sharon R. Mason, Ch. 
Mark Efinger 
Marcelle Gregg 
Barbara Rogers 
Robert Katz 
Norma Villarreal 



2003 



-2001 
-2001 
-2002 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 



SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

Kathleen M. Hess 
Rosalie Konjoian 
Madhu Sndhar 
Cynthia Milne 
Sheila Doherty 
Ruby Easton 
David Reilly 
Stephanie Smith 
Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 



-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 
-2001 



183 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



SENIOR CENTER BUILDING COMM. 



Dorothy L. Bresnahan, Ch. 


-2002 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan, Ch. 


-2001 


Martin Epstein 


-2002 


Spencer Johnson 


-2001 


Oscar Rosenberg 


-2002 


Frank Sherman 


-2003 


Robert J. Schneider, MD 


-2001 


Doreen Correnti 


-2002 


Elizabeth Tice 


-2001 


Parke Sickler 


-2003 


Marlies Zammuto 


-2001 


Tim Sullivan 


-2001 


Doreen Correnti 


-2003 


Donna LaConti 


-2002 


Zeff Marusich 


-2003 


Rita M. Carrier 


-2002 


Maureen Jandovitz 


-2001 






William T. Ryan 


-2003 






Richard Bowen 


-2001 






Judith G. Trerotola 


-2003 






BALLARD VALE/LOWELL JUNCTION AREA 


MAIN STREET COMMITTEE 

Denis H. Ryan 




TRAFFIC TASK FORCE 




-2003 


Mary French, Chair 


-2001 


John R. Daher 


-2003 


Douglas White 


-2001 


Judith F. Wright 


-2003 


Jean Verzola-Henry 


-2001 


Abigail O'Hara 


-2003 


Christian C. Huntress 


-2001 


Sheila M. Doherty 


-2003 


Lawrence P. Johnson 


-2001 


Clifford T. Markell 


-2003 


Joseph W. Watson 


-2001 


John C. Campbell 


-2003 


Ed Deloury 


-2001 


John A. Simko 


-2003 


Arthur H. Barber 


-2001 


Gerald T. Mulligan 


-2003 


Michael Frishman 


-2001 


Karen M. Herman 


-2003 


George H. Baxter 


-2001 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2003 


Audrey Nason 


-2001 






William M. Langdell 


-2001 






Richard Nill 


-2001 






TOWN GOVERNMENT REVIEW COMM. 


BOARD OF REGISTRARS 




Michael W. Morris, Ch. 


-2003 


Joanne D. Dee 


-2003 


Paul C. Dow 


-2003 


Carolyn Simko 


-2002 


Julie Pike 


-2003 


Wendall Mattheson 


-2001 


Ruth H. Dunbar 


-2003 






Mark Merritt 


-2003 


VETERANS AGENT 




John D. O'Brien, Jr. 


-2003 


John C. Doherty 


-2001 


Paula R. Trespas 


-2003 






John D. Doherty, Ex. Officio 


-2003 


INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 





Randall L. Hanson, Ex. Officio - 2003 



GR. LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT REP. 



Richard D. Lindsay, DVM - 2001 

NORTHEAST SOLID WASTE COMM. REP. 



John A. Petkus, Jr. 



-2001 



John A. Petkus, Jr. 



2001 



MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMM. 

Stephen L. Colyer -2001 

DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 



MERR. VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY 

Stephen L. Colyer - 2001 

LOCAL SUPT. OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 



2001 



Jack O'Donnell 



2001 



184 



***************** 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

***************** 

Mailing Address: 

Town Offices, 36 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 



8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M. Monday - Friday 
(Building Division - 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.) 



Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE - EMERGENCY 9 1 1 

Fire Department - Business 623-8466 

Police Department - Business 475-041 1 

Animal Control Officer 475-041 1 

Town Offices Switchboard 623-8200 

Fax Number 623-8221 

DCS Classes & Activities 623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 623-8350 

Human Resources Office 623-8530 

Memorial Hall Library 623-8400 

Senior Center 623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 623-8501 



Andover's Home Page: http://www.town.andover.ma.us 

Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: www.mhl.org 
Andover's Population: 30,251 Square Miles: 32 



Number of Acres: 19,900 

1,750 controlled by Conservation Commission 
1,000 owned by A. V.I.S. 
889 owned by Commonwealth - Harold Parker State Forest 



185 



Andover's Tax Rate: 



$14.92 - Residential and Open Space 

$20.59 - Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 



When are Taxes Due: 



Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 
August 1st - November 1st - February 1st - May 1st 



Excise Tax Information: Call Assessor's Office at 623-8264 



Recycling: 

Curbside Pickup: 



Every other week - recyclables (glass - all colors - newspapers, 
magazines, junk mail, office paper and paper board (cereal & cracker 
boxes), steel & tin cans, aluminum containers, #1 and #2 plastics and 
corrugated containers - crush/flatten) will be collected on the same 
day as the trash collection. Place recycling bin curbside by 7:00 A.M. 
on your pick up day. 



Recycling Information & Complaints: Call Waste Management, Inc. at 1-800-562-0321 

Compost Site: High Plain Road (Bald Hill area). Leaves and grass clippings. Open 

year round for walk-ins, drive-ins as announced in local newspapers. 



Rubbish Complaints or Inquiries: BFI at 1-800-442-9006 



Pothole or Snow Removal Complaints: 



Highway Division at 623-8426 or 
Dept. of Public Works at 623-8350 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: 



Appliances can no longer be left curbside with your trash - 
their disposal is the homeowner's responsibility. Suggestions 
for disposal: hire a private contractor or check with the 
company where your new appliance was purchased to see if 
they will take the old appliance. 



Town Meeting and Election: 



Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. Andover 
has an Open Town Meeting which is generally held four 
weeks following the Town Election. 



Voter Registration Information: 



Town Clerk's Office 



623-8255 



186 



Where To Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 



Ballfield Permits & Rentals 



Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electric) 

Business Certificate 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 



Liquor License 
(Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 

Town House Rental 

Zoning By-law Variance 



Facilities Coordinator 623-8450 
at Town House 



Town Clerk's Office 



623-8255 



Building Division 623-8301 

(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 



Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Health Division 
Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 



Town Clerk's Office 

Fire Department 

Fire Department 

Dept. of Public Works 

Facilities Coordinator 
at Town House 

Building Division 
Board of Appeals Office 



623-8255 

623-8255 

623-8255 

623-8255 

623-8295 or 
623-8255 

623-8255 



623-8255 
623-8466 
623-8466 
623-8350 
623-6450 



623-8301 or 
623-8315 



187 



HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 



United States Senators: 

The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy (D) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, Boston, MA 02203 

(617)565-3170 

SR-315 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-4543 

The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin Square, Boston, MA 021 14 

(617)565-8519 

SR-362 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

(202) 224-2742 

United States Representative: 

Honorable Martin T. Meehan (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01852 

(508) 459-0101 

1216 Longworth House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515 

(202)225-3411 

State Senator: 

Susan C. Tucker (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

6 Farrwood Drive, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 4 1 6 A, Boston, MA 02 1 3 3 

(617)722-1612 

State Representatives: 

Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Seventeenth Essex District 

1 6 Balmoral Street, Andover, MA 01810 

State House, Room 436, Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2575 

David M. Nangle (D) 

Eighteenth Middlesex District 

43 Crowley Street, Lowell, MA 01852 

State House, Room 448, Boston, MA 02133 

(617) 722-2582 

188 



WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU 



The Board of Selectmen and Town Manager welcome your ideas and comments about our 
municipal services and policies, or any general comments you may have about the Town of Andover. 
Please let us know what you think on this survey and return it to: 




TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 

TOWN OFFICES 

36 BARTLET STREET, ANDOVER, MA 01810 



Brian P. Major 

Chairman, Board of Selectmen 




Reginald S/ Sfcfcczynski 
Town Manager 






Tell us one thing that you really like that the Town does. 



Tell us one thing that you would like to see improved upon. 



Name and Address (Optional) 
189 




Aaa BOND-RATED COMMUNITY 



BY MOODY'S INVESTORS SERVICE 



DECEMBER 2000